Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958)

Sinfonia antartica & Symphony No 9

The Hallé Orchestra, Sir Mark Elder (conductor) Detailed performer information
 
 
Download only Available Friday 3 June 2022This album is not yet available for download
Label: Hallé
Recording details: Various dates
Various recording venues
Produced by Various producers
Engineered by Various engineers
Release date: 3 June 2022
Total duration: 105 minutes 49 seconds
 

Evolving from Vaughan Williams's score for the 1948 film Scott of the Antartic, the Sinfonia antartica is one of the composer's most unusual works, its scoring including wordless solo soprano and women’s chorus, organ, piano and extensive tuned and untuned percussion. It is presented here alongside the mighty Symphony No 9 (the one with 'demented cat' saxophones) and two popular miniatures.

(Studio Master: Please note that the recordings of The lark ascending and the Norfolk Rhapsody included here are taken from the 2006 album English landscapes and have been 'up-sampled' to 24-bit.)

Sinfonia antartica (Symphony No 7)
During the 1950s, the Hallé and its Permanent Conductor, Sir John Barbirolli, enjoyed a warm and fruitful collaboration with Vaughan Williams, which included the premieres of the composer’s seventh (Sinfonia antartica) and eighth symphonies. The relationship dated back to 1944, when Barbirolli and the Hallé made the first recording of the fifth. During the orchestra’s 1951/2 season, to mark the composer’s 80th birthday, a cycle was given of all his symphonies to date, at the end of which, after a performance of the sixth in Sheffield on 22 March, Barbirolli announced to the audience that the composer’s next symphony was finished and that the Hallé would have the honour of giving its premiere.

The new work had its origins in Vaughan Williams’s score for the 1948 film Scott of the Antarctic. Even after the film’s release, the music and the subject would not leave him alone; between 1949 and 1952 it took on symphonic proportions, becoming the Sinfonia antartica, with its material drawn from the film score. Vaughan Williams dedicated it to Ernest Irving, who had invited him to compose the music for the film and conducted the recording. The scoring of the film (and hence the symphony) is one of the composer’s most original concepts; it includes a wordless solo soprano and three-part small women’s chorus, organ, piano and extensive tuned and untuned percussion.

The premiere of the Sinfonia antartica was given at the Free Trade Hall, Manchester, on 14 January 1953, with the soprano Margaret Ritchie, the women of the Hallé Choir and the Hallé, conducted by Barbirolli. The late Michael Kennedy, the great authority on Vaughan Williams, explained in his masterly study The Works of Vaughan Williams, that in the artists’ room afterwards the composer first dubbed Barbirolli with the sobriquet ‘glorious John’. Barbirolli and the Hallé made the first recording of the work in June that year.

Vaughan Williams came from radical stock—the Wedgwoods and Darwins—from whom he inherited a questing spirit that manifested itself as a characteristic aspect of his art. This is reflected in a spiritual, humanistic sense in the opera The Pilgrim’s Progress as well as, in Sinfonia antartica, in terms of humanity’s thirst to explore. Captain Scott’s ill-fated expedition to reach the South Pole struck a resonance in Vaughan Williams, so that the symphony may be seen as a symbol of humanity pitted against the forces of implacable nature. This is emphasised too in the quotations that head each of its five movements.

The Prelude’s heroic theme was the film’s title music, and it recurs as a significant motif during the work. It gives way to the chilling evocation of the Antarctic wilderness by tuned percussion (glockenspiel, xylophone and vibraphone), wind machine, piano and celesta, keening voices and the empty, freezing line of the solo soprano. The two protagonists are set side by side, as reflected in the quotation from Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound, as the explorers prepare:

To suffer woes which Hope thinks infinite,
To forgive wrongs darker than death or night,
To defy Power, which seems omnipotent …
Neither to change nor falter nor repent,
This … is to be
Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free.
This is alone Life, Joy, Empire and Victory!

The Scherzo is prefaced by a quotation from Psalm 104:

There go the ships:
And there is that Leviathan
Whom thou hast made to take his pastime therein.

The word ‘Leviathan’ refers to a section marked ‘Whales’ in the film score from which the Scherzo is reworked. The whales are epitomised by a descending motif played by cor anglais and lower winds, tuba and cello. Apart from them, the lolloping gait of penguins is easily identified on clarinets, then playfully divided between the trumpets.

Landscape, the symphony’s centrepiece, is its most powerful movement. It is headed by Coleridge’s description of an Alpine glacier in his Hymn Before Sun-rise, in the Vale of Chamouni:

Ye ice falls! Ye that from the mountain’s brow
Adown enormous ravines slope amain –
Torrents, methinks, that heard a mighty voice,
And stopped at once amid their maddest plunge!
Motionless torrents! Silent cataracts!

The music originates from the section where Scott’s party make the gruelling ascent of a glacier. With its recurring second intervals, grinding together like moving ice, block chords and a slow canon—heard initially between flutes with piccolo, plus trumpets, trombones and tuba, as well as an organ pedal—the music portrays in an almost tactile manner the painful step-by-step struggle of the explorers. The climax is a master stroke, as the organ thunders in fortissimo, providing a vivid musical metaphor for both the vastness and bulk of the glacier, and the courage of the men who conquered it.

The Intermezzo is drawn from music where the explorers recall loved ones at home, as reflected by the quotation from John Donne’s The Sun Rising:

Love, all alike, no season knows, nor clime,
Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.

The sense of nostalgia and separation is evoked by a poignant oboe solo accompanied by harp chords, then solo violin. Towards the movement’s end, a passage with deep bells and the very soft music that follows are associated in the film with the death of Captain Oates.

In the Epilogue, although the final tragedy is reached, the spirit of courage in the face of adversity that marks the words of Scott’s last journal is translated into an epic march developed from the theme of the Prelude:

I do not regret this journey … We took risks, we knew we took them; things have come out against us, and therefore we have no cause for complaint.

Despite the heroism of the march, the blizzard overwhelms Scott and his companions: the symphony ends in the desolation of icy wastes.
Andrew Burn

Norfolk Rhapsody No 1
Folk-song is the basis of the Norfolk Rhapsody No 1 which Vaughan Williams composed in 1906. He had begun folk-song collecting in 1903, inspired by the example of Cecil Sharp, and had a particularly rich haul in East Anglia in 1905. He planned to write a Norfolk Symphony but instead he used the folk-tunes in three Norfolk Rhapsodies. No 1 was first played at a Promenade Concert in 1906 conducted by Henry J Wood and Nos 2 and 3 followed at the 1907 Cardiff Festival. Eventually Nos 2 and 3 were withdrawn and No 1 was revised in 1914 when some folk-song quotations were deleted and the coda re-written. The opening evokes the sense of sky and space one feels in East Anglia and it is not long before a solo viola quotes the tragic and beautiful song The Captain’s Apprentice. Although the breezier tunes of A Bold Young Sailor and On Board a ’98 are also quoted, it is the Apprentice melody that dominates the score and gives it a haunting quality.
Michael Kennedy

Symphony No 9 in E minor
‘Visionary’ is the most appropriate adjective to describe Vaughan Williams’s final symphonic utterance, commissioned by and dedicated to the Royal Philharmonic Society. Vaughan Williams wrote in his programme note that he composed his ninth symphony during 1956/7 in London, Majorca and Ashmansworth, at the home of the composer Gerald Finzi and his wife Joy, although Finzi himself had died in September 1956, and Vaughan Williams made some further revisions in spring 1958. The ninth was premiered on 2 April 1958, by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Sir Malcolm Sargent, just four months before Vaughan Williams’s death. At the time it was widely dismissed as backward-looking, the work of a composer past his prime; however, as Michael Kennedy perceptively commented, ‘Only a handful heard a new richness of sound’—among them Neville Cardus, the renowned critic of The Manchester Guardian.

The ninth is the most enigmatic of Vaughan Williams’s symphonies, the clue to its character partly lying in an abandoned ‘programme’ about places and literature associated with Wessex: Salisbury, Stonehenge and Thomas Hardy’s novel Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Philosophically the work explores the deepest issues of human existence. It is as if the theme explored in the Sinfonia antartica—humanity attempting to overcome the forces of nature—is translated here into the struggle between opposing forces that lie within the human psyche. In addition, the work seems to be wrestling with the ultimate purpose of existence.

Although scored for standard 20th-century orchestral forces, plus a second harp and celesta, the ninth symphony continues Vaughan Williams’s preoccupation during his final years with instrumental colour, and includes three saxophones and flugelhorn, the latter described by the composer, in his at times tongue-in-cheek programme note, as a ‘beautiful and neglected instrument—not usually allowed in the select circles of the orchestra’, but instead ‘banished to the brass band, where it is allowed to indulge in the bad habit of vibrato to its heart’s content’. As for the saxophones, they are ‘not expected, except possibly in one place in the Scherzo, to behave like demented cats, but are allowed to be their own romantic selves’.

The work’s symphonic process reflects the culmination of a lifetime’s compositional experience: its themes are more elusive, less clear-cut than earlier in the composer’s career and are now in a complex process of constant flux and subtle transformation. Taking the first movement, for example, Vaughan Williams wrote that it was ‘not in strict sonata form, but obeys the general principles of statement, contrast and repetition’.

The opening has a monumental grandeur that recalls Bruckner. The ascending first theme, inspired by Bach’s St Matthew Passion, is heard in the depths of brass and wind. Baleful saxophones wailing mournfully and a fortissimo descending triplet phrase on woodwind, violins and violas complete the first group of ideas. Clarinets with harp introduce the second group: a rising cantabile melody (which bears kinship with the opening of the sixth symphony), followed by a quiet descending violin phrase incorporating an oscillating minor third. As the ideas are contrasted and developed, cataclysmic upheavals are unleashed, and the secondary theme achieves dominance. After a powerful climax, a solo violin ushers in the movement’s tranquil closing section, followed by the lugubrious flugelhorn. The return of the saxophones’ melancholy keening leaves lingering unease.

The slow movement juxtaposes two starkly different ideas. The first is a benign melody for flugelhorn, unaccompanied and played as if far away; it was ‘borrowed’ from an early withdrawn tone-poem, The Solent, and is the stabilising force within the movement, since it always recurs at the same pitch. The other idea is a bizarre, spectral march (the composer described it as ‘barbaric’), heard first on brass, and associated originally with music to evoke the ghostly drummer of Salisbury Plain. The march becomes elaborated and more menacing as the movement proceeds. In the movement’s centre, starting contemplatively on strings, is an episode of tender beauty. The flugelhorn melody returns, underpinned by pianississimo strokes of gong and bells; a brief intrusion of the march fades, leaving the last word to flugelhorn and clarinet.

Saxophones dominate the Scherzo, which Vaughan Williams described as ‘a movement of juxtaposition, not of development’. The superficially scherzando nature of the tunes (one moment the saxophones are jaunty, the next they swirl and swoop) belies the undertones of a sardonic dance heightened by side-drum and xylophone interjections. In the Trio, saxophones again usher in a fugato that incorporates Scherzo ideas into the counterpoint. It leads to a mocking saxophone chorale: this, according to Vaughan Williams’s programme note, ‘is where the demented cats come in’. An orchestral outburst of a Scherzo idea in augmented rhythm leads to the short coda, the saxophones petering out, to leave just the side-drum tapping away, sinisterly, to silence.

‘The final movement is really two movements played without a break,’ wrote Vaughan Williams, and it begins with a quiet singing melody on the first violins that, arch-like, soars upwards, then descends. Overall, the structural edifice is united by three elements that recur throughout both halves: a short rocking chordal sequence appearing first on brass and harps; the phrase that follows it on horns; and a melody rising on lower strings and bass clarinet that has links with the first theme of the opening movement. Very quiet chords in wind and strings, punctuated by timpani and bass drum strokes, preface a lyrical viola theme that provides the connection between the two halves. The climax of the movement, and the resolution of the symphony as a whole, is built from the rocking phrase. Then comes the masterstroke: against the long-held E major chords of the orchestra, the saxophones intrude with chords of F and G, mysteriously swelling and receding three times. The effect is like staring into the vast, awesome unknown, even beyond life itself.
Andrew Burn

The lark ascending
One of the most evocative (and popular) examples of English pastoralism is the Romance for violin and orchestra by Vaughan Williams to which he gave the title The lark ascending after a poem by George Meredith which begins:

He rises and begins to round
He drops the silver chain of sound
Of many links without a break
In chirrup, whistle, slur and shake…

That verse is as good a description of the music as one could attempt. The work is today so well loved and familiar that it is easy to overlook its originality and to take its beauty for granted. After the violin’s entry, during which the lark ascends almost out of our hearing as well as of our sight, the orchestra has a short interlude. The theme sounds like a folk-song but isn’t. The violin soon rejoins the orchestra. Its soaring line anticipates Messiaen’s obsession with bird-song by thirty years and encapsulates in music the lyric-pastoral atmosphere of English Georgian poetry. The work was composed in 1914 for Marie Hall but Vaughan Williams put it aside until his return from service in the First World War. She was the soloist in 1921 in the first performance of the orchestral version, with Adrian Boult conducting. It must already have sounded like an elegy for a vanishing England.
Michael Kennedy

Hallé © 2022

Sinfonia antartica «Symphonie nº 7»
Au cours des années 1950, le Hallé et son Chef permanent, Sir John Barbirolli, entretinrent une chaleureuse et fructueuse collaboration avec Vaughan Williams, avec à la clé les créations des septième (Sinfonia antartica) et huitième symphonies du compositeur. Cette relation avait débuté en 1944, quand Barbirolli et le Hallé avaient gravé le premier enregistrement de la cinquième. Pendant sa saison 1951/2, l’orchestre célébra le 80e anniversaire du compositeur en exécutant toutes les symphonies qu’il avait écrites jusqu’alors; une fois ce cycle conclu par une exécution de la sixième à Sheffield le 22 mars, Barbirolli annonça au public que la prochaine symphonie du compositeur était achevée et que le Hallé aurait l’honneur d’en donner la création.

Le nouvel ouvrage émane de la partition écrite par Vaughan Williams pour le film de 1948 L’épopée du capitaine Scott. Cette musique et ce sujet avaient continué à le hanter bien après la sortie du film, et entre 1949 et 1952 ils prirent des proportions symphoniques pour devenir la Sinfonia antartica, avec son matériau tiré de la partition du film. Vaughan Williams dédia la symphonie à Ernest Irving, qui l’avait invité à composer la bande sonore et en avait dirigé l’enregistrement. L’orchestration du film (et donc de la symphonie) est l’une des plus originales conçues par le compositeur: elle fait appel à une soliste soprano qui chante sans paroles et à un petit chœur de femmes à trois voix, avec orgue, piano et un large éventail de percussions accordées et désaccordées.

La création de la Sinfonia antartica fut donnée au Free Trade Hall de Manchester le 14 janvier 1953, avec la soprano Margaret Ritchie, les choristes féminines du Chœur du Hallé et le Hallé, sous la direction de Barbirolli. Le défunt Michael Kennedy, grand spécialiste de Vaughan Williams, raconta dans sa magistrale étude The Works of Vaughan Williams (Les œuvres de Vaughan Williams) que c’est à la suite de ce concert, dans la loge des artistes, que le compositeur donna pour la première fois à Barbirolli le sobriquet de «Glorieux John». Barbirolli et le Hallé réalisèrent le premier enregistrement de l’ouvrage en juin de cette même année.

Vaughan Williams était issu de souches familiales radicales—les Wedgwood et les Darwin—et il avait hérité d’elles l’esprit inquisiteur qui était l’une des caractéristiques de son art, reflété dans l’aspect spirituel et humaniste de l’opéra The Pilgrim’s Progress, ainsi que dans la soif humaine d’exploration illustrée par la Sinfonia antartica. L’expédition vouée à l’échec du Captain Scott, partie pour rejoindre le Pôle Sud, fit résonner une corde chez Vaughan Williams, si bien qu’on peut voir dans sa symphonie un symbole de l’humanité confrontée aux forces d’une nature implacable, ce que soulignent aussi les citations figurant en tête de chacun des cinq mouvements de l’ouvrage.

Le thème héroïque du Prélude était le générique de début du film, et il reparaît comme un motif significatif au cours de l’ouvrage. Il laisse place à la glaciale évocation des vastes étendues de l’Antarctique par des percussions accordées (glockenspiel, xylophone et vibraphone), une machine à vent, le piano et le célesta, des voix funèbres et la ligne creuse et gelée de la soliste soprano. Pendant que les explorateurs se préparent, on nous présente les protagonistes, comme l’indique la citation du Prométhée délivré de Shelley:

To suffer woes which Hope thinks infinite,
To forgive wrongs darker than death or night,
To defy Power, which seems omnipotent …
Neither to change nor falter nor repent,
This … is to be
Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free.
This is alone Life, Joy, Empire and Victory!

La préface du Scherzo est une citation du Psaume 104:

There go the ships:
And there is that Leviathan
Whom thou hast made to take his pastime therein.

Le mot «Léviathan» fait référence à la section nommée «Whales» («Baleines») de la partition du film, dont le Scherzo est un remaniement. Les baleines sont incarnées par un motif descendant confié au cor anglais et aux vents graves, au tuba et au violoncelle. Outre les baleines, on peut facilement entendre les pingouins se dandiner aux clarinettes, puis ils sont malicieusement répartis entre les trompettes.

Landscape, la pièce de résistance de la symphonie, est aussi son passage le plus intense. En préface figure la description que fait Coleridge d’un glacier alpin dans son Hymne avant le lever du soleil dans la vallée de Chamonix:

Ye ice falls! Ye that from the mountain’s brow
Adown enormous ravines slope amain –
Torrents, methinks, that heard a mighty voice,
And stopped at once amid their maddest plunge!
Motionless torrents! Silent cataracts!

La musique provient de la séquence où l’expédition de Scott entreprend l’éreintante ascension d’un glacier. Avec ses intervalles de seconde récurrents, crissant les uns les autres comme des masses de glace qui se déplacent, des block chords et un lent canon—d’abord énoncé par les flûtes et le piccolo, auxquels s’ajoutent les trompettes, les trombones et le tuba, ainsi qu’une pédale d’orgue—, ce morceau dépeint de manière presque tangible la douloureuse progression des explorateurs pour qui chaque pas est une lutte. Le climax est un coup de maître, l’orgue tonnant soudain fortissimo et fournissant une saisissante métaphore musicale à la fois de l’énormité du glacier géant et du courage des hommes lancés à son assaut.

L’Intermezzo est tiré du passage où les explorateurs évoquent leurs proches qui les attendent à la maison, ce que reflète la citation du poème de John Donne The Sun Rising:

Love, all alike, no season knows, nor clime,
Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.

Le sentiment de nostalgie et de séparation est évoqué par un poignant solo de hautbois accompagné d’accords de harpe, puis par un violon soliste. Vers la fin du mouvement, un passage avec des sons de cloches graves et la très douce musique qui suit sont associés dans le film à la mort du capitaine Oates.

Dans l’Épilogue, bien que la tragédie finale soit accomplie, l’esprit du courage dans l’adversité qui marque les derniers mots écrits par Scott dans son journal est traduit par une marche épique développée à partir du thème du Prélude:

I do not regret this journey … We took risks, we knew we took them; things have come out against us, and therefore we have no cause for complaint.

Malgré l’héroïsme de la marche, le blizzard engouffre Scott et ses compagnons et la symphonie s’achève dans la désolation des plaines glacées.
Andrew Burn

Norfolk Rhapsody nº 1
La chanson populaire est le fondement de la Norfolk Rhapsody nº 1 que Vaughan Williams composa en 1906. Il avait commencé à collecter des chansons populaires en 1903, inspiré par l’exemple de Cecil Sharp, et fit une moisson particulièrement fructueuse en East Anglia en 1905. Il projetait d’écrire une Symphonie de Norfolk, mais au lieu de cela il employa les mélodies populaires dans trois Norfolk Rhapsodies. La nº 1 fut créée lors d’un concert Promenade en 1906 dirigé par Henry J Wood et les nº 2 et nº 3 suivirent lors de l’édition 1907 du Festival de Cardiff. Finalement, les nº 2 et nº 3 furent retirées (mais la nº 2 a maintenant été enregistrée) et la nº 1 fut révisée en 1914, certaines citations de chansons populaires étant supprimées et la coda réécrite. L’ouverture évoque la sensation de ciel et d’espace que donnent les paysages d’East Anglia, et un solo d’alto ne tarde pas à citer la tragique et magnifique chanson The Captain’s Apprentice (L’apprenti du capitaine). Bien que les mélodies plus insouciantes de A Bold Young Sailor (Un jeune marin intrépide) et On Board a ’98 (A bord d’un ’98) soient galement citées, c’est celle de l’apprenti qui domine la partition et la rend si envoûtante.
Michael Kennedy

Symphonie nº 9
«Visionnaire» est l’adjectif qui convient le mieux pour décrire la dernière proposition symphonique de Vaughan Williams, commande de la Royal Philharmonic Society à laquelle elle est également dédiée. Vaughan Williams écrivit dans sa note de programme qu’il avait composé sa neuvième symphonie en 1956/7 à Londres, Majorque et chez le compositeur Gerald Finzi et son épouse Joy à Ashmansworth. Finzi devait s’éteindre en septembre 1956, et Vaughan Williams apporta quelques révisions à son ouvrage au printemps 1958. La neuvième fut créée le 2 avril 1958 par le Royal Philharmonic Orchestra sous la direction de Sir Malcolm Sargent, quatre mois à peine avant le décès de Vaughan Williams. À l’époque, la plupart des commentateurs la balayèrent d’un revers de main, y voyant l’œuvre rétrograde d’un compositeur sur le déclin; toutefois, comme le fit remarquer Michael Kennedy avec perspicacité: «Rares furent ceux qui surent y déceler une nouvelle opulence sonore.» Parmi ceux-ci figurait Neville Cardus, le critique renommé du Manchester Guardian.

La neuvième est la plus énigmatique des symphonies de Vaughan Williams; on peut discerner quelques-uns de ses traits de personnalité dans un «programme» axé sur les lieux et la littérature du Wessex—Salisbury, Stonehenge et le roman de Thomas Hardy Tess d’Urberville—, même si ce programme fut ensuite abandonné. Du point de vue philosophique, l’ouvrage sonde les questionnements les plus profonds de l’existence humaine. C’est comme si le thème exploré dans la Sinfonia antartica—l’humanité tentant de surmonter les forces de la nature—était traduit ici dans la lutte entre les forces adverses que renferme la psyché humaine. En fin de compte, l’ouvrage semble vouloir aborder le sens suprême de l’existence.

Bien qu’elle soit orchestrée pour un effectif standard du XXe siècle, avec une seconde harpe et un célesta, la neuvième symphonie perpétue les interrogations de Vaughan Williams dans ses dernières années de vie au sujet du coloris instrumental, et comprend trois saxophones et un bugle, ce dernier décrit par le compositeur dans sa note de programme parfois malicieuse comme «un bel instrument boudé—qui n’est pas souvent admis de les cercles select de l’orchestre», mais plutôt «exilé dans les ensembles de cuivres, où on tolère qu’il s’adonne à sa guise à la mauvaise habitude du vibrato.» Quant aux saxophones, «on ne s’attend pas, hormis peut-être dans un passage du Scherzo, à les voir se comporter comme des chats en folie, mais il leur est permis de laisser libre cours à leur romantisme inné.»

Le processus symphonique de l’ouvrage reflète la culmination de l’expérience de toute une existence créative: les thèmes sont plus insaisissables, moins clairement délimités que plus tôt dans la carrière du compositeur et participent désormais d’un processus complexe de flux constant et de transformation subtile. Au sujet du premier mouvement, par exemple, Vaughan Williams écrivit qu’il n’était «pas en forme sonate au sens strict, mais inféodé aux principes généraux d’énonciation, de contraste et de répétition».

La grandeur monumentale de l’ouverture fait penser à Bruckner. Le premier thème ascendant, inspiré par la Passion selon Saint Matthieu de Bach, est énoncé dans les profondeurs des cuivres et des vents. Un sombre lamento de sinistres saxophones et une phrase de triolets descendante jouée fortissimo aux bois, violons et altos complètent le premier groupe d’idées. Les clarinettes et la harpe introduisent le deuxième groupe, une mélodie ascendante cantabile (apparentée à l’ouverture de la sixième symphonie), suivie d’une paisible phrase de violon descendante qui incorpore une tierce mineure oscillante. À mesure que les idées sont contrastées et développées, des turbulences cataclysmiques se déchaînent, et le thème secondaire prend le dessus. Après un puissant apogée, un violon soliste introduit la paisible section conclusive du mouvement, suivi par une lugubre intervention du bugle. Le retour de la déploration mélancolique du saxophone laisse un sillage de malaise persistant.

Le mouvement lent juxtapose deux idées totalement différentes. La première est une mélodie affable pour bugle, sans accompagnement et jouée comme dans le lointain; «empruntée» à The Solent, poème symphonique abandonné par le compositeur, elle agit comme une force stabilisante au sein du mouvement: en effet, elle reparaît toujours sur les mêmes notes. L’autre idée est une marche étrange et spectrale (le compositeur la qualifiait même de «barbare»), xd’abord entendue aux cuivres, et associée au départ à une musique évoquant la légende du tambour fantôme de Salisbury Plain. La marche se fait plus complexe et menaçante au fil du mouvement. Celui-ci renferme en son centre un épisode d’une beauté attendrie qui commence de manière contemplative aux cordes. La mélodie de bugle reparaît, sous-tendue par des coups de gong et des sons de cloches marqués pianississimo; une brève intrusion de la marche s’efface, laissant le dernier mot au bugle et à la clarinette.

Les saxophones dominent le Scherzo, que Vaughan Williams décrivait comme «un mouvement de juxtaposition et non de développement». La nature superficiellement scherzando des mélodies (les saxophones sont enjoués un moment, puis s’enroulent et plongent en piqué juste après) vient démentir les sous-entendus d’une danse sardonique renforcés par des interjections de la caisse claire et du xylophone. Dans le Trio, ce sont à nouveau les saxophones qui introduisent un fugato incorporant dans son contrepoint des idées de Scherzo, et l’on débouche sur un choral de saxophone moqueur: d’après la note de programme de Vaughan Williams, «c’est là que les chats en folie font leur entrée». L’éclat orchestral d’une idée de Scherzo sur un rythme augmenté mène à la courte coda, les saxophones s’essoufflent pour laisser place aux seuls battements de la caisse claire, sinistres, puis c’est le silence.

«Le mouvement final est en fait constitué de deux mouvements joués sans interruption», écrivit Vaughan Williams, et il commence par une douce mélodie chantante aux premiers violons qui s’élève comme une arche avant de redescendre. L’édifice structurel dans son ensemble est uni par trois éléments qui reviennent au fil des deux moitiés: une brève séquence d’accords berceurs d’abord énoncée aux cuivres et aux harpes; la phrase qui la suit est confiée aux cors; et une mélodie émanant des pupitres de cordes graves et des clarinettes basses apparentée au premier thème du mouvement initial. Des accords très paisibles aux vents et aux cordes, ponctués par des timbales et des coups de grosse caisse, préfacent un thème d’alto lyrique qui fournit le lien entre les deux moitiés. Le climax du mouvement, qui est aussi la résolution de la symphonie dans son ensemble, est édifié à partir de la phrase berceuse. Puis vient le coup de maître: sur le fond des accords de mi majeur longuement tenus à l’orchestre, les saxophones font intrusion avec des accords de fa et sol, qui enflent et se dégonflent mystérieusement par trois fois, donnant la sensation de porter le regard sur une immensité inconnue et redoutable, voire au-delà même de la vie.
Andrew Burn

The lark ascending
L’un des exemples les plus évocateurs (et populaires) de pastoralisme anglais est la Romance pour violon et orchestre de Vaughan Williams, qu’il intitula The lark ascending (L’envol de l’alouette) d’après un poème de George Meredith dont voici les premiers vers:

Elle s’élève et commence à tournoyer,
Elle dénoue de son chant la chaîne argentée
Aux maints chaînons infrangibles,
Et gazouille et sifflote son ramage intangible …

Ces vers constituent la meilleure description possible du morceau. Aujourd’hui, ces pages sont tellement aimées et connues qu’il est facile d’en oublier l’originalité et de tenir leur beauté pour acquise. Après l’entrée du violon, pendant laquelle l’alouette devient d’un coup d’aile presque aussi invisible qu’elle est difficile à entendre, l’orchestre se voit confier un bref interlude. Le thème donne l’impression—erronée—d’être une chanson populaire. Le violon ne tarde pas à rejoindre l’orchestre. Sa ligne ascendante annonce déjà, trente ans à l’avance, l’obsession de Messiaen pour les chants d’oiseaux, et sa musique présente l’atmosphère lyrico-pastorale de la poésie anglaise de l’époque géorgienne. Ce morceau fut composé en 1914 pour Marie Hall, mais Vaughan Williams le mit de côté, attendant d’avoir fini de servir pendant la Première Guerre mondiale. En 1921, Marie Hall fut la soliste lors de la création de la version orchestrale, avec Adrian Boult au pupitre. Ces pages devaient déjà faire figure d’élégie pour une certaine Angleterre en voie de disparition.
Michael Kennedy

Hallé © 2022
Français: David Ylla-Somers

Sinfonia antartica „Sinfonie Nr. 7“
Während der 1950er-Jahre bestand zwischen dem Hallé-Orchester sowie dessen Hauptdirigenten Sir John Barbirolli und Vaughan Williams eine freundschaftliche und fruchtbare Zusammenarbeit, die unter anderem die Uraufführungen der Sinfonie Nr. 7 (Sinfonia antartica) und Sinfonie Nr. 8 des Komponisten umfasste. Diese Beziehung reichte bis zum Jahr 1944 zurück, als Barbirolli und das Hallé-Orchester die erste Aufnahme der fünften Sinfonie verwirklichten. Anlässlich des 80. Geburtstags des Komponisten wurde während der Orchestersaison 1951/2 ein Zyklus aller seiner bis dato geschaffenen Sinfonien präsentiert. Nach der Aufführung der abschließenden sechsten Sinfonie am 22. März in Sheffield verkündete Barbirolli dem Publikum, dass die nächste Sinfonie des Komponisten fertiggestellt sei und dem Hallé-Orchester die Ehre der Uraufführung zuteilwerde.

Das neue Werk ging auf Vaughan Williams’ Partitur für den Film Scott of the Antarctic aus dem Jahr 1948 zurück. Doch auch nach der Filmveröffentlichung ließen ihn Musik und Thematik nicht los und nahmen zwischen 1949 und 1952 gleichsam eine sinfonische Dimension an—so kam es zur Sinfonia antartica, deren Material sich auf die Filmpartitur stützte. Vaughan Williams widmete sie Ernest Irving, der ihn eingeladen hatte, die Musik für den Film zu komponieren, und die Aufnahme dirigierte. Die Partitur des Films (und damit der Sinfonie) bringt eines der originellsten Konzepte des Komponisten zum Ausdruck und beinhaltet einen wortlosen Solosopran und einen dreiteiligen kleinen Frauenchor sowie Orgel, Klavier und umfangreiche gestimmte und nicht gestimmte Schlaginstrumente.

Die Uraufführung der Sinfonia antartica erfolgte am 14. Januar 1953 in der Free Trade Hall, Manchester, mit der Sopranistin Margaret Ritchie, den Frauen des Hallé-Chors sowie dem Hallé-Orchester unter der Leitung von Barbirolli. Wie der verstorbene Michael Kennedy, die große Koryphäe in Sachen Vaughan Williams, in seiner meisterhaften Studie The Works of Vaughan Williams erläuterte, gab der Komponist direkt nach der Aufführung im Künstlerraum Barbirolli erstmals den Spitznamen „glorious John“. Im Juni desselben Jahres wurde das Werk mit dem Hallé-Orchester unter der Ägide von Barbirolli erstmals aufgenommen.

Vaughan Williams’ Herkunft aus einem Umfeld radikaler Köpfe—den Wedgwoods und Darwins—schlug sich bei ihm in einem strebenden Geist nieder, einem charakteristischen Merkmal seiner Kunst. Dieser zeigt sich in spirituellem, humanistischem Gewand in der Oper The Pilgrim’s Progress sowie im menschlichen Entdeckerdrang in der Sinfonia antartica. Captain Scotts verhängnisvolle Expedition an den Südpol berührte Vaughan Williams, sodass die Sinfonie als ein Symbol für die Menschheit im Ringen mit den Kräften einer unerbittlichen Natur gesehen werden kann. Dies unterstreichen auch die jedem der fünf Sätze vorausgehenden Zitate.

Das heroische Thema des Prelude diente im Film als Titelmusik und kehrt als wichtiges Motiv im Verlauf der Sinfonie wieder. Es weicht dem beklemmenden Hervorrufen der antarktischen Wildnis durch gestimmte Schlaginstrumente (Glockenspiel, Xylophon und Vibraphon), Windmaschine, Klavier und Celesta, wehklagende Stimmen und die leere, eisige Linie des Solosoprans. Die beiden Protagonisten werden einander gegenübergestellt, wie das Zitat aus Shelleys Prometheus Unbound widerspiegelt, als sich die Forscher vorbereiten:

To suffer woes which Hope thinks infinite,
To forgive wrongs darker than death or night,
To defy Power, which seems omnipotent …
Neither to change nor falter nor repent,
This … is to be
Good, great and joyous, beautiful and free.
This is alone Life, Joy, Empire and Victory!

Dem Scherzo geht ein Zitat aus Psalm 104 voraus:

There go the ships:
And there is that Leviathan
Whom thou hast made to take his pastime therein.

Das Wort „Leviathan“ nimmt auf einen mit „Whales“ gekennzeichneten Abschnitt in der Filmmusikpartitur Bezug, auf dessen Grundlage das Scherzo bearbeitet wurde. Die Wale werden durch ein absteigendes Motiv versinnbildlicht, das auf dem Englischhorn und tiefen Bläsern sowie Tuba und Cello erklingt. Der tapsende Gang der Pinguine wiederum lässt sich leicht in den Klarinetten erkennen, bevor er spielerisch zwischen den Trompeten aufgeteilt wird.

Landscape, das Herzstück der Sinfonie, ist der eindringlichste Satz. Ihm wird Coleridges Beschreibung eines Alpengletschers im Gedicht Hymn Before Sun-rise, in the Vale of Chamouni vorangestellt:

Ye ice falls! Ye that from the mountain’s brow
Adown enormous ravines slope amain –
Torrents, methinks, that heard a mighty voice,
And stopped at once amid their maddest plunge!
Motionless torrents! Silent cataracts!

Die Musik stammt aus dem Teil, in dem Scotts Gruppe die strapaziöse Besteigung eines Gletschers in Angriff nimmt. Mit ihren wiederkehrenden zweiten Intervallen, die sich wie bewegliche Eisschichten reiben, Blockakkorden und einem langsamen Kanon—zunächst zwischen Flöten mit Piccolo, dazu Trompeten, Posaunen und Tuba sowie ein Orgelpedal—bildet die Musik auf beinahe taktile Weise das schmerzliche, schrittweise Ringen der Männer ab. Der Höhepunkt ist ein Geniestreich—eine donnernde Orgel, fortissimo, als lebhafte musikalische Metapher für die Weite und Masse des Gletschers wie auch für den Mut derer, die ihn bezwangen.

Das Intermezzo beruht auf Musik, bei der sich die Forscher an ihre Lieben in der Heimat erinnern. Dazu wird ein Zitat aus John Donnes Gedicht The Sun Rising angeführt:

Love, all alike, no season knows, nor clime,
Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.

Empfindungen von Wehmut und Trennung werden durch ein ergreifendes Oboensolo begleitet von Harfenakkorden, dann in der Solovioline hervorgerufen. Eine gegen Ende des Satzes erklingende Passage mit tiefen Glocken, gefolgt von einer sehr sanften Musik, wird im Film mit dem Tod von Captain Oates in Verbindung gebracht.

Im Epilogue kommt es zur finalen Tragödie, doch der Mut angesichts widriger Umstände, von dem Scotts letzte Tagebucheinträge zeugen, wird anhand des Themas des Prelude in einen epischen Marsch übersetzt:

I do not regret this journey … We took risks, we knew we took them; things have come out against us, and therefore we have no cause for complaint.

Trotz allen Heldengeistes des Marsches werden Scott und seine Begleiter vom Schneesturm überwältigt und die Sinfonie endet in der trostlosen Öde der Eiswüste.
Andrew Burn

Norfolk Rhapsody Nr. 1
Die Norfolk Rhapsody Nr. 1, die Vaughan Williams 1906 komponierte, beruht auf Volksliedern. Er hatte 1903 unter dem Einfluss von Cecil Sharp begonnen, Volksweisen zu sammeln, und 1905 gelangen ihm in der ostenglischen Landschaft von East Anglia einige besonders geglückte Funde. Er plante, eine Norfolk-Sinfonie zu schreiben, doch stattdessen verwendete er die Volksweisen in drei Norfolk Rhapsodies. Die Nr. 1 wurde 1906 bei einem Promenadenkonzert unter der Leitung von Henry J Wood uraufgeführt, Nr. 2 und 3 folgten 1907 beim Cardiff Festival. Nach einiger Zeit wurden Nr. 2 und 3 zurückgezogen (auch wenn die Nr. 2 inzwischen auf Tonträger eingespielt worden ist), und Nr. 1 wurde 1914 revidiert—einige der Volksliedzitate wurden gestrichen, die Coda wurde umgearbeitet. Die Einleitung beschwört das Gefühl von Himmel und Weite herauf, das man in East Anglia verspürt, und bald zitiert eine Solobratsche das tragische und wunderschöne Lied “The Captain’s Apprentice”. Obwohl die eher unbekümmerten Melodien von “A Bold Young Sailor” und “On Board a ’98” ebenfalls zitiert werden, beherrscht die “Apprentice” Melodie die Partitur und vermittelt ihr einen Anflug von Sehnsucht.
Michael Kennedy

Sinfonie Nr. 9
„Visionär“ ist wohl die treffendste Beschreibung für Vaughan Williams’ letztes Werk in Sinfonieform, das von der Royal Philharmonic Society in Auftrag gegeben wurde und dieser auch gewidmet ist. Wie einer Programmnotiz von Vaughan Williams zu entnehmen ist, komponierte er die neunte Sinfonie in den Jahren 1956/7 in London und Mallorca sowie in Ashmansworth im Haus des Komponisten Gerald Finzi und dessen Frau Joy (Finzi selbst war im September 1956 verstorben); im Frühjahr 1958 überarbeite er das Werk nochmals. Die Uraufführung durch das Royal Philharmonic Orchestra unter Leitung von Sir Malcolm Sargent fand am 2. April 1958 statt, nur vier Monate vor Vaughan Williams’ Tod. Damals wurde das Werk weitgehend als rückwärtsgewandt abgetan—die Arbeit eines Komponisten, der seinen Zenit schon längst überschritten hatte. Michael Kennedy merkte scharfsinnig an: „Nur eine Handvoll hörte eine neue Vielfalt des Klangs“—darunter Neville Cardus, der renommierte Kritiker des The Manchester Guardian.

Die Neunte ist von Vaughan Williams’ Sinfonien die rätselhafteste, wobei der Schlüssel zu ihrem Wesen in einem aufgegebenen „Programm“ zu Orten und Literatur liegt, die mit Wessex in Verbindung stehen: Salisbury, Stonehenge und Thomas Hardys Roman Tess of the d’Urbervilles. Aus philosophischer Sicht ergründet das Werk die tiefgreifendsten Aspekte des menschlichen Daseins. Das in der Sinfonia antartica beleuchtete Thema—der Versuch der Menschheit, die Natur zu bezwingen—wird hier gewissermaßen auf den Kampf zwischen gegensätzlichen Kräften innerhalb der menschlichen Psyche übertragen. Darüber hinaus scheint das Werk auch mit dem letztendlichen Zweck des Daseins zu ringen.

Die Partitur der Neunten Sinfonie war zwar auf ein standardmäßiges Orchesterarsenal des 20. Jahrhunderts einschließlich zweiter Harfe und Celesta ausgerichtet, doch Vaughan Williams setzte mit diesem Werk seine in den letzten Lebensjahren gepflegte Beschäftigung mit instrumentalen Klangfarben fort und fügte drei Saxophone und ein Flügelhorn hinzu. Letzteres beschrieb der Komponist in seinen bisweilen augenzwinkernden Programmnotizen als „schönes und vernachlässigtes Instrument … im auserwählten Kreise des Orchesters üblicherweise nicht zugelassen“, sondern „in die Blaskapelle verbannt, wo es seiner schlechten Gewohnheit des Vibrato nach Herzenslust frönen kann“. Was die Saxophone betraf, so „sei nicht erwartet, außer vielleicht an einer Stelle im Scherzo, dass sie sich wie verrückt gewordene Katzen verhalten, sie dürfen im Gegenteil ganz ihrer romantischen Veranlagung nachgehen“.

Im sinfonischen Prozess dieses Werkes erreicht eine lebenslange Kompositionserfahrung ihren Höhepunkt: Die Themen sind flüchtiger, weniger klar konturiert als noch früher in der Laufbahn des Komponisten und bewegen sich nun in einer komplexen Dynamik des ständigen Flusses und subtiler Verwandlungen. So schrieb Vaughan Williams etwa zum Kopfsatz: „… er steht nicht in der strikten Sonatenform, sondern gehorcht den allgemeinen Grundsätzen von Aussage, Kontrast und Wiederholung“.

Die Sinfonie beginnt mit einer monumentalen Größe, die an Bruckner erinnert. Das von Bachs Matthäus-Passion inspirierte aufsteigende erste Thema erklingt in den Tiefen der Blech- und Holzbläser. Mit unheilschwangeren, jammervoll klagenden Saxophonen und einer absteigenden fortissimo Triolenphrase in den Holzbläsern, Geigen und Bratschen kommt die erste Ideengruppe zum Abschluss. Die zweite Gruppe wird durch Klarinetten mit Harfe eingeleitet: eine aufsteigende cantabile Melodie (die mit der Einleitung der sechsten Sinfonie verwandt ist) und daran anschließend eine ruhige absteigende Violinenphrase mit einer oszillierenden kleinen Terz. Während die Ideen kontrastiert und entwickelt werden, brechen sich verhängnisvolle Umwälzungen Bahn und das zweite Thema gewinnt die Oberhand. Nach einem packenden Höhepunkt führt eine Solovioline in den ruhigen Schlussteil des Satzes, gefolgt vom wehmütigen Flügelhorn. Die Wiederkehr der klagenden Melancholie der Saxophone hinterlässt Unbehagen.

Im langsamen Satz werden zwei äußerst unterschiedliche Ideen gegenübergestellt. Die erste, eine gutartige Melodie des Flügelhorns, unbegleitet und wie aus der Ferne, wurde aus einer frühen unveröffentlichten Tondichtung des Komponisten namens The Solent „geliehen“ und fungiert innerhalb des Satzes als stabilisierende Kraft, da sie stets in derselben Tonhöhe wiederkehrt. Die zweite Idee ist ein bizarrer, gespenstischer Marsch (vom Komponisten als „barbarisch“ beschrieben), der zunächst von den Blechbläsern gespielt wird und ursprünglich in Verbindung mit Musik steht, die den Geistertrommler von Salisbury Plain beschwören soll. Der Marsch wird im Verlauf des Satzes immer aufwendiger und bedrohlicher. Eine Episode von zarter Schönheit, die besinnlich in den Streichern beginnt, bildet das Herzstück des Satzes. Die Flügelhorn-Melodie kehrt zurück, unterlegt von pianississimo Schlägen des Gongs und der Glocken. Kurz dringt der Marsch ein, doch das letzte Wort gehört dem Flügelhorn und der Klarinette.

Saxophone dominieren das Scherzo, das Vaughan Williams als „Satz der Gegenüberstellung, nicht der Entwicklung“ bezeichnete. Der auf den ersten Blick scherzando anmutende Charakter der Melodien (in einem Moment sind die Saxophone munter, im nächsten wirbeln und stürzen sie herab) täuscht über die Untertöne eines sarkastischen Tanzes hinweg, die durch Einwürfe der kleinen Trommel und des Xylophons verstärkt werden. Die drei Saxophone leiten wieder ein Fugato ein, das Scherzo-Ideen in den Kontrapunkt einbindet. Dies führt zu einem spöttischen Saxophonchoral oder, wie es Vaughan Williams in seiner Programmnotiz fasste, „hier kommen die verrückt gewordenen Katzen“. Einem orchestralen Ausbruch einer Scherzo-Idee in erweitertem Rhythmus folgt eine kurze Coda; die Saxophone verklingen, sodass nur noch die kleine Trommel unheilvoll klopfend den Satz beschließt.

„Beim letzten Satz handelt es sich eigentlich um zwei Sätze ohne Pause“, schrieb Vaughan Williams. Die Einleitung bildet eine ruhige, singende Melodie der ersten Violinen, die in einer bogenförmigen Entwicklung zuerst auf- und dann absteigt. Strukturell wird das Gebilde durch drei in beiden Hälften wiederkehrende Elemente vereint: eine kurze, wiegende Akkordsequenz zunächst in den Blechbläsern und Harfen, die ihr folgende Phrase in den Hörnern und eine Melodie, die aus den tiefen Streichern und der Bassklarinette aufsteigt und mit dem ersten Thema das Kopfsatzes verknüpft ist. Sehr ruhige Akkorde der Bläser und Streicher, durchbrochen von Pauken- und Basstrommelschlägen, leiten ein lyrisches Bratschenthema ein, das die Verbindung zwischen den beiden Hälften herstellt. Der Höhepunkt des Satzes und die Auflösung der gesamten Sinfonie baut sich aus einer schaukelnden Phrase auf. Dann der Geniestreich: Vor dem Hintergrund der lang gehaltenen E-Dur-Akkorde des Orchesters dringen die Saxophone mit Akkorden in F und G ein, die auf rätselhafte Weise dreimal anschwellen und abklingen. Es wirkt, als würde man in ehrfurchtgebietende unbekannte Weiten blicken, noch über die Grenzen des Lebens hinaus.
Andrew Burn

The lark ascending
Eines der evokativsten (und populärsten) Beispiele für englische Bukolik, wenn auch nicht an eine bestimmte Landschaft gebunden, ist die Romanze für Violine und Orchester von Vaughan Williams, der er den Titel The lark ascending gab, nach dem Gedicht über die aufsteigende Lerche von George Meredith, das folgendermaßen beginnt:

Erhebt sich und beginnt zu kreisen,
lässt fallen silberner Töne Kette,
vielgliedrig ohne Unterbrechung,
aus Tschilpen, Pfeifen, Schleifern, Trillern

Dieser Vers eignet sich wohl so gut wie nur denkbar als Beschreibung der Musik. Das Werk ist heute so beliebt und weithin bekannt, dass seine Originalität leicht übersehen und seine Schönheit als selbstverständlich hingenommen wird. Nach dem Einsatz der Violine, in dessen Verlauf die Lerche bis fast außerhalb unserer Sichtund Hörweite aufsteigt, hat das Orchester ein kurzes Zwischenspiel. Das Thema klingt wie eine Volksweise, ist jedoch keine. Die Violine gesellt sich bald wieder zum Orchester. Ihre hoch aufsteigende Melodielinie nimmt Messiaens Faszination mit Vogelgesang um dreißig Jahre vorweg und fängt die lyrisch-pastorale Atmosphäre englischer georgianischer Dichtung in Musik ein. Das Werk entstand 1914 für Marie Hall, doch Vaughan Williams legte es beiseite, bis er vom Militärdienst im Ersten Weltkrieg zurückkehrte. Sie war dann die Solistin bei der Uraufführung der Orchesterfassung im Jahre 1921 unter der Leitung von Adrian Boult. Das Werk muss seinerzeit bereits wie eine Elegie auf ein im Verschwinden begriffenes England geklungen haben.
Michael Kennedy

Hallé © 2022
Deutsch: Katja Klier

Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...