Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897)

Piano Sonatas & Rhapsodies

Garrick Ohlsson (piano)
 
 
Available Friday 2 July 2021This album is not yet available for download
Label: Hyperion
Recording details: November 2019
All Saints' Church, East Finchley, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Andrew Keener
Engineered by David Hinitt
Release date: 2 July 2021
Total duration: 69 minutes 5 seconds

Cover artwork: Evening in Tivoli (1880) by Hans Thoma (1839-1924)
Kunstmuseum Moritzburg Halle (Saale) / AKG-Images, London
 

Both sonatas recorded here are the work of the young Brahms—still a teenager when he wrote Op 2—and perfectly complement the much later rhapsodies. These are magisterial accounts from a pianist noted for his mastery of the Romantics.

Seated at the piano, he began to reveal wondrous regions to us. We were drawn into ever more magical spheres. In addition, the playing was absolutely inspired, transforming the piano into an orchestra of lamenting and loudly jubilant voices. There were sonatas, more like veiled symphonies; songs, whose poetry would be understood without knowing the words, although a profound vocal melody runs through them all; individual piano pieces, some of them demonic in nature while graceful in form; then sonatas for violin and piano, string quartets—and each work so different from the next that it seemed to stream forth from its own individual source. And then it seemed as though he were uniting them all like a stream roaring forth into a waterfall, with a peaceful rainbow above its tumultuously descending waves, and butterflies flitting about on the banks accompanied by the song of nightingales.

Schumann’s famous description of the young Brahms appeared in the Leipzig Neue Zeitschrift für Musik of 28 October 1853, in an article headed ‘Neue Bahnen’ (‘New paths’). Less than a month earlier, Brahms had called at the house of Robert and Clara Schumann in Düsseldorf. (‘He played us sonatas, scherzos etc. by him, all of them full of effusive imagination, intimate feeling and masterly form’, wrote Clara in her diary.) How many of the pieces Schumann mentions in his article have actually survived is open to question. Certainly, the always acutely self-critical Brahms destroyed the violin sonatas and string quartets; and the three now familar piano sonatas seem to have been preceded by others. The first of the published sonatas to be composed, in November 1852, was the one in F sharp minor, Op 2. However, the andante of the C major sonata, Op 1, based on the old German folk song ‘Verstohlen geht der Mond auf’, had been written some six months previously. More than forty years later, Brahms returned to the same song and used it to bring his collection of 49 Deutsche Volkslieder to an end. Thus, he told his publisher Fritz Simrock, his life’s work had come full circle: ‘The last of my folk songs and the same in my Op 1 represent the snake that bites its tail.’

All three of Brahms’s piano sonatas begin with a grandiose gesture flung across the entire compass of the keyboard. In the case of the Sonata No 1 in C major, the rhythm of the opening subject forcibly recalls the start of Beethoven’s ‘Hammerklavier’ sonata, Op 106. But there is a reference to another Beethoven sonata at work here too: Brahms almost immediately restates his first subject a whole tone lower, in B flat, just as Beethoven had done in his C major ‘Waldstein’ sonata. Brahms’s second subject, much of it played with the soft pedal, is an expressive, yearning idea in the key of A minor. It is this theme that permeates the long central development section, until Brahms manages to present it in contrapuntal combination with the assertive opening subject. The recapitulation is surprisingly restive and unstable, with the first subject passing through a variety of keys, and the second again appearing in the minor. Only in the closing moments does the music emerge triumphantly into the light of C major.

The slow movement is a series of variations on a melody Brahms describes as being based on an old Minnelied—an idea he also carried out in the andante of his Op 2 sonata. Brahms found these melodies in an anthology compiled in the 1830s by Andreas Kretzschmer and Anton Wilhelm von Zuccalmaglio under the title Deutsche Volkslieder mit ihren Original-Weisen (‘German folk songs with their original melodies’). Brahms had the words of the song printed beneath the opening bars of his slow movement:

Verstohlen geht der Mond auf.
Blau, blau Blümelein!
Durch Silberwölkchen führt sein Lauf.
Blau, blau Blümelein!
Rosen im Thal,
Mädel im Saal,
O schönste Rosa!
Stealthily rises the moon.
Blue, blue flower!
Its way leads through silver cloudlets.
Blue, blue flower!
Roses in the dale,
maiden in the hall,
O most beautiful Rosa!

After three increasingly elaborate and free variations, Brahms appends a calm coda—a sort of duet for tenor and soprano voices, suggesting the ‘two faithful hearts’ of the poem’s ending. The coda’s final bars, in a slower tempo, offer a foretaste of the theme of the scherzo, which follows without a break. As we shall see, Brahms carried out a similar scheme, though on a more elaborate scale, in his Op 2 sonata.

The scherzo of Op 1, in E minor, has a quicker trio in the sonata’s home key of C major. The trio’s rising phrases are presented in waves of increasing intensity and urgency, reaching a passionate climax before they subside, and a rushing scale sends the music hurtling into the reprise of the scherzo.

The rondo finale is based on a rhythmically transfigured version of the first movement’s opening subject. And so, just as the slow movement and scherzo are linked together, the sonata’s outer movements are interrelated. For the finale’s central episode in the minor, the music’s metre changes from three beats per bar to two, and Brahms presents a melody which was inspired by a poem of Robert Burns: ‘My heart’s in the Highlands’. This time, Brahms would have known the text through Schumann’s translated setting in his song cycle called Myrthen. He follows his textual source closely enough to make it possible for his melody to be underlain by Burns’s words, and the use of another folk-like text ties in the finale with the slow movement. As this episode comes to an end, Brahms alternates snatches of its melody with fragments of the main rondo theme, before the latter makes a full return. A coda in a quicker tempo brings the work to an exultant close.

Much as he had done with regard to the outer movements in the Op 1 sonata, Brahms carried out a scheme of unification between the two middle movements of the Sonata No 2 in F sharp minor, Op 2. The andante was inspired, as Brahms confided to his composer friend Albert Dietrich, by another old Minnelied, ‘Mir ist leide’ (‘I am pained’). The last of the four variations that go to make up this second movement sees the melody transformed from minor to major, and two seemingly conflicting elements unfold simultaneously: the pianist’s left hand plays the melody ‘sempre molto sostenuto’, while above it the right hand has a series of panting phrases played ‘con molt’ agitazione’. The latter are an echo of the opening movement’s passionate second subject, and they make a reappearance in the parallel subject of the finale. Meanwhile, with the third movement, which follows without a pause, Brahms returns to the minor and presents what is at one and the same time a fifth variation and a scherzo in its own right. It is a highly original stroke, and all the more remarkable when we bear in mind that the sonata is the work of a nineteen-year-old composer. Following the scherzo’s more relaxed trio, with its resonating horn calls, only the first half of the scherzo returns in its original form. The remainder finds its material surmounted by grandiose trills, as if in anticipation of the closing moments of the finale.

The outer movements, with their far-flung keyboard gestures, provide a vivid illustration of what Schumann meant when he called Brahms’s sonatas ‘veiled symphonies’. Once the forceful double octaves of the work’s beginning are over, a mysterious new idea appears deep in the bass of the piano. The new idea provides the generating force behind the remainder of the exposition—first, in the guise of an accompaniment to the breathless phrases of the second subject’s opening stage; and then, in inverted form, as an impassioned melody which draws the exposition towards its close. It is characteristic of Brahms’s lifelong desire to create music which evolves constantly that the recapitulation emerges seamlessly out of the central development section, with the music only finding its way back to the home key at the reprise of the main subject’s second half.

As he was later to do in his F minor piano quintet and his first symphony, Brahms prefaces the finale with a slow introduction. In this improvisatory beginning we find the sinuous shape of the finale’s main subject anticipated in slow motion, as well as a series of trills and sweeping scales that will return in the sonata’s closing moments. The outline shape of the movement’s main theme is taken over into the ‘zigzag’ figuration of the left-hand accompaniment to the incisive second subject. Brahms brings the exposition to a close with a powerful series of sustained chords that finds itself transformed at the start of the central stage of the piece into a mysterious moment of stillness, before the full force of the development section is unleashed. At the end, the music’s tension dissolves in a slow coda in the major, offering a return to the trills and improvisatory flourishes of the movement’s beginning.

When Brahms’s F sharp minor sonata appeared in print, in 1854, it bore a dedication to Clara Schumann ‘in admiration’. That dedication was not made without some trepidation on Brahms’s part. At the end of November 1853, he wrote to Schumann, asking: ‘May I set your wife’s name at the head of my second work? I hardly dare, yet I should so much like to give you a small token of my reverence and gratitude.’ And the following February, in his earliest surviving letter addressed to her, Brahms confessed to Clara: ‘I have dared to put your name at the head of the sonata. May you not find this as immodest as I now do; I hardly dare send it to you.’ Thus, Brahms’s Op 2 sonata may be said to mark the start of a relationship that lasted until Clara Schumann’s death more than forty years later, on 20 May 1896—less than a year before Brahms himself died.

The 2 Rhapsodies, Op 79, were composed in 1879—more than a quarter-century after Brahms’s piano sonatas. The impulsive opening subject of the B minor first of the pair is followed by a tender pianissimo melody which is soon brushed aside by the forceful return of the initial theme. The new melody, so briefly glimpsed at this stage, forms the basis of the consolatory middle section in the major. It makes a further return, this time in the left hand, during the coda which follows the reprise of the first section.

The second rhapsody, in G minor, is actually a sonata movement in itself, complete with a repeat of its exposition. The exposition’s final stage is accompanied by a constantly rocking minor second, or semitone, in an inner voice, and the same unchanging rocking motion casts its influence over the entire second half of the central development section. It returns, too, in the final moments of the piece, where it gradually decelerates and fades away, before a full-blooded final cadence brings proceedings to an abrupt close.

Misha Donat © 2021

Assis au piano, il commença de nous découvrir de merveilleux pays. Il nous entraîna dans des régions de plus en plus enchantées. Son jeu, en outre, était absolument génial; il transforma le piano en un orchestre aux voix tour à tour exultantes et gémissantes. Ce furent des sonates, ou plutôt des symphonies voilées; des chants dont on aurait saisi la poésie sans même connaître les paroles, tout imprégnés d’un profond sens mélodique; de simples pièces pour piano tantôt démoniaques, tantôt de l’aspect le plus gracieux; puis des sonates pour piano et violon, des quatuors à cordes, chaque œuvre si différente des autres que chacune paraissait couler d’une autre source. Et alors il semblait qu’il eut, tel un torrent tumultueux, tout réuni en une même cataracte, un pacifique arc-en-ciel brillant au-dessus de ses flots écumants, tandis que des papillons folâtrent sur ses berges et que l’on entend le chant des rossignols.

Le célèbre portrait du jeune Brahms que fit Schumann parut dans la Neue Zeitschrift für Musik de Leipzig du 28 octobre 1853 dans un article intitulé «Neue Bahnen» («Nouveaux chemins»). Moins d’un mois plus tôt, Brahms était passé chez Robert et Clara Schumann à Düsseldorf. («Il nous joua des sonates, des scherzos etc. de son cru, tous plein d’une imagination enthousiaste, de sentiment intime et de forme magistrale», écrivit Clara dans son journal.) Il reste à savoir combien de pièces mentionnées par Schumann dans son article nous sont parvenues. Brahms, qui faisait toujours à l’excès son autocritique, a certainement détruit les sonates pour violon et piano et les quatuors à cordes; et les trois sonates pour piano que nous connaissons aujourd’hui semblent avoir été précédées par d’autres. La première des sonates publiées à avoir été composée, en novembre 1852, est celle en fa dièse mineur, op.2. Toutefois, l’andante de la Sonate en ut majeur, op.1, basé sur la vieille chanson traditionnelle allemande «Verstohlen geht der Mond auf», avait été écrit environ six mois auparavant. Plus de quarante ans après, Brahms revint à la même chanson et l’utilisa pour mettre un terme à son recueil de 49 Deutsche Volkslieder. Ainsi, il dit à son éditeur Fritz Simrock qu’il venait de boucler la boucle de l’œuvre de sa vie: «La dernière de mes chansons traditionnelles, la même que dans mon op.1, représente le serpent qui se mord la queue.»

Les trois sonates pour piano de Brahms commencent toutes par un geste grandiose qui balaye toute l’étendue du clavier. Dans le cas de la Sonate nº 1 en ut majeur, le rythme du sujet initial rappelle avec force le début de la sonate «Hammerklavier», op.106, de Beethoven. Mais il y a aussi une référence à une autre sonate de Beethoven: Brahms réexpose presque immédiatement son premier sujet un ton entier plus bas, en si bémol majeur, comme Beethoven l’avait fait dans sa sonate «Waldstein» elle aussi en ut majeur. Le second sujet de Brahms, joué en grande partie avec la pédale douce, est une idée expressive pleine de désir dans la tonalité de la mineur. C’est ce thème qui imprègne le long développement central, jusqu’à ce que Brahms parvienne à le présenter dans une combinaison contrapuntique avec le sujet initial assuré. La réexposition est étonnamment agitée et instable, le premier sujet passant dans différentes tonalités et le second apparaissant une fois encore en mineur. Il faut attendre les derniers moments pour que la musique émerge triomphalement dans la lumière d’ut majeur.

Le mouvement lent est une série de variations sur une mélodie que Brahms décrit comme basée sur un vieux Minnelied—une idée qu’il mit en œuvre également dans l’andante de sa sonate op.2. Brahms trouva ces mélodies dans une anthologie compilée au cours des années 1830 par Andreas Kretzschmer et Anton Wilhelm von Zuccalmaglio sous le titre Deutsche Volkslieder mit ihren Original-Weisen («Chansons traditionnelles allemandes avec leurs mélodies originales»). Brahms fit imprimer les paroles de la chanson sous les premières mesures de son mouvement lent:

Verstohlen geht der Mond auf.
Blau, blau Blümelein!
Durch Silberwölkchen führt sein Lauf.
Blau, blau Blümelein!
Rosen im Thal,
Mädel im Saal,
O schönste Rosa!
Furtive, la lune se lève.
Bleu, bleu fleurette!
Sa course passe par les nuages argentés.
Bleu, bleu fleurette!
Roses dans le val,
fille dans la salle,
Ô splendide Rosa!

Après trois variations de plus en plus élaborées et libres, Brahms ajoute une calme coda—une sorte de duo pour voix de ténor et de soprano, évoquant les «deux cœurs fidèles» de la fin du poème. Les dernières mesures de la coda, dans un tempo plus lent, donnent un avant-goût du thème du scherzo qui suit sans interruption. Comme on le verra, Brahms mit en œuvre un plan analogue, mais à une échelle plus élaborée, dans sa sonate op.2.

Le scherzo de l’op.1, en mi mineur, comporte un trio plus rapide dans la tonalité d’origine de la sonate, ut majeur. Les phrases ascendantes du trio sont présentées par vagues d’intensité et d’urgence croissantes, atteignant un sommet passionné avant de s’apaiser; une gamme très rapide nous propulse ensuite dans la reprise du scherzo.

Le rondo final repose sur une version transfigurée sur le plan rythmique du sujet initial du premier mouvement. Et, tout comme le mouvement lent et le scherzo sont liés, les mouvements externes de cette sonate le sont étroitement. Pour l’épisode central en mineur du finale, la métrique de la musique passe de trois à deux temps par mesure et Brahms présente une mélodie inspirée d’un poème de Robert Burns: «My heart’s in the Highlands» («Mon cœur est dans les Hautes-Terres»). Cette fois, Brahms dût avoir connaissance de ce texte grâce à la traduction mise en musique par Schumann dans son cycle de lieder intitulé Myrthen. Il suit sa source textuelle d’assez près pour parvenir à ce que les mots de Burns soient sous-tendus par sa mélodie, et l’utilisation d’un autre texte de genre traditionnel crée un lien entre le finale et le mouvement lent. Au moment où cet épisode s’achève, Brahms alterne des bribes de cette mélodie avec des fragments du thème principal du rondo, avant que ce dernier revienne entièrement. Une coda dans un tempo plus rapide mène cette œuvre à une conclusion triomphante.

Un peu comme il l’avait fait à propos des mouvements externes de la sonate op.1, Brahms réalisa un plan d’unification entre les deux mouvements centraux de la Sonate nº 2 en fa dièse mineur, op.2. Comme le confia Brahms à son ami, le compositeur Albert Dietrich, l’andante lui fut inspiré par un autre ancien Minnelied, «Mir ist leide» («J’ai de la peine»). Dans la dernière des quatre variations qui composent ce deuxième mouvement, la mélodie passe du mineur au majeur, et deux éléments apparemment conflictuels se déroulent simultanément: la main gauche du pianiste joue la mélodie «sempre molto sostenuto», pendant qu’au dessus la main droite joue une série de phrases haletantes «con molt’ agitazione». Ces dernières sont un écho du second sujet passionné du mouvement initial et elles réapparaîtront dans le sujet parallèle du finale. Entre-temps, avec le troisième mouvement qui s’enchaîne au précédent, Brahms revient au mode mineur et présente ce qui est tout à la fois une cinquième variation et un scherzo à part entière. C’est une manière de faire très originale et d’autant plus remarquable lorsque l’on tient compte du fait que cette sonate est l’œuvre d’un compositeur âgé de dix-neuf ans. Après le trio plus détendu du scherzo, avec ses sonneries de cor qui résonnent, seule la première moitié du scherzo revient sous sa forme originale. Le reste trouve son matériel surmonté par des trilles grandioses, comme pour anticiper les derniers moments du finale.

Les mouvements externes, avec leurs gestes étendus sur le clavier, illustrent de façon très frappante ce que voulait dire Schumann lorsqu’il qualifiait les sonates de Brahms de «symphonies voilées». Une fois terminées les énergiques doubles octaves du début de l’œuvre, une nouvelle idée mystérieuse apparaît dans l’extrême grave du piano. La nouvelle idée donne la force génératrice derrière le reste de l’exposition—tout d’abord, sous la forme d’un accompagnement des phrases haletantes de la phase initiale du second sujet; puis, sous forme inversée, comme une mélodie passionnée qui tire l’exposition vers sa conclusion. Le fait que la réexposition émerge sans heurt du développement central est caractéristique du désir qu’eut Brahms toute sa vie durant de créer une musique en constante évolution, la musique ne retrouvant son chemin vers la tonalité d’origine qu’à la reprise de la seconde moitié du sujet principal.

Comme il allait le faire par la suite dans son quintette avec piano en fa mineur et dans sa première symphonie, Brahms fait précéder le finale d’une introduction lente. Dans son début improvisatoire, on trouve la forme sinueuse du sujet principal du finale anticipé lentement, ainsi qu’une série de trilles et de vastes gammes qui reviendront dans les derniers moments de la sonate. La forme des contours du thème principal du mouvement est reprise dans la figuration «zigzagante» de l’accompagnement du second sujet incisif à la main gauche. Brahms mène l’exposition à sa conclusion avec une puissante série d’accords soutenus qui se trouve transformée au début de la phase centrale de la pièce en un mystérieux moment de calme, avant que toute la force du développent se déchaîne. À la fin, la tension de la musique s’évanouit dans une lente coda en majeur, offrant un retour aux trilles et aux ornementations improvisées du début du mouvement.

Lorsque la sonate en fa dièse mineur de Brahms fut publiée, en 1854, elle portait une dédicace à Clara Schumann «en admiration». Ce n’est pas sans quelque appréhension que Brahms inscrivit cette dédicace. À la fin du mois de novembre 1853, il écrivit à Schumann pour lui demander: «Puis-je mettre le nom de votre épouse en tête de ma deuxième œuvre? J’ose à peine, mais pourtant j’aimerais tant vous donner un petit témoignage de mon profond respect et de ma gratitude.» Et au mois de février suivant, dans la première lettre à Clara qui nous est parvenue, Brahms lui avouait à Clara: «J’ai osé mettre votre nom en tête de ma sonate. J’espère que vous ne trouverez pas cela présomptueux comme moi aujourd’hui.J’ose à peine vous l’envoyer.» Ainsi, on peut dire que la sonate op.2 de Brahms marque le début d’une relation qui dura jusqu’à la mort de Clara Schumann plus de quarante ans plus tard, le 20 mai 1896—moins d’un an avant la mort de Brahms lui-même.

Les 2 Rhapsodies, op.79, furent composées en 1879—plus d’un quart de siècle après les sonates pour piano de Brahms. Le sujet initial impulsif de la première rhapsodie en si mineur est suivi d’une tendre mélodie pianissimo vite écartée par le retour énergique du thème initial. La nouvelle mélodie, si brièvement entrevue à ce stade, constitue la base de la section centrale réconfortante en majeur. Elle fait un autre retour, cette fois à la main gauche, au cours de la coda qui suit la reprise de la première section.

La deuxième rhapsodie, en sol mineur, est en réalité un mouvement de sonate à elle seule, avec une reprise de son exposition. La phase finale de l’exposition est accompagnée dans une voix interne par une seconde mineure, ou demi-ton, en constant balancement, et le même balancement exerce son influence sur toute la seconde moitié du développement central. Il revient également dans les derniers moments du morceau, où il ralentit peu à peu et s’estompe, avant qu’une vigoureuse cadence finale nous conduise à une conclusion abrupte.

Misha Donat © 2021
Français: Marie-Stella Pâris

Am Clavier sitzend, fing er an wunderbare Regionen zu enthüllen. Wir wurden in immer zauberischere Kreise hineingezogen. Dazu kam ein ganz geniales Spiel, das aus dem Clavier ein Orchester von wehklagenden und lautjubelnden Stimmen machte. Es waren Sonaten, mehr verschleierte Symphonien,—Lieder, deren Poesie man, ohne die Worte zu kennen, verstehen würde, obwohl eine tiefe Gesangsmelodie sich durch alle hindurchzieht,—einzelne Klavierstücke, theilweise dämonischer Natur von der anmuthigsten Form,—dann Sonaten für Violine und Klavier,—Quartette für Saiteninstrumente,—und jedes so abweichend vom andern, daß sie jedes verschiedenen Quellen zu entströmen schienen. Und dann schien es, als vereinigte er, als Strom dahinbrausend, alle wie zu einem Wasserfall, über die hinunterstürzenden Wogen den friedlichen Regenbogen tragend und am Ufer von Schmetterlingen umspielt und von Nachtigallenstimmen begleitet.

Schumanns berühmte Beschreibung des jungen Brahms erschien als Artikel mit dem Titel „Neue Bahnen“ in seiner Neuen Zeitschrift für Musik vom 28. Oktober 1853. Weniger als einen Monat zuvor hatte Brahms bei Robert und Clara Schumann in Düsseldorf vorgesprochen, woraufhin Clara in ihrem Tagebuch vermerkte: „Er spielte uns Sonaten, Scherzos etc. von sich, alles voll überschwänglicher Phantasie, Innigkeit der Empfindung und meisterhaft in der Form.“ Es ist nicht ganz klar, wie viele der Stücke, die Schumann in dem Artikel aufführt, tatsächlich überliefert sind. Der stets äußerst selbstkritische Brahms vernichtete bekanntermaßen die Violinsonaten und Streichquartette, und den drei heute bekannten Klaviersonaten waren offensichtlich mehrere weitere vorausgegangen. Von jenen drei Werken, die er schließlich zur Publikation freigab, hatte er als erstes die Sonate fis-Moll op. 2 im November 1852 komponiert. Das Andante der C-Dur-Sonate op. 1, dem das alte Volkslied „Verstohlen geht der Mond auf“ zugrunde liegt, war allerdings bereits etwa ein halbes Jahr zuvor entstanden. Über 40 Jahre später kehrte Brahms zu demselben Lied zurück und setzte es an das Ende seiner Sammlung von 49 Deutschen Volksliedern. Damit, so erklärte er seinem Verleger Fritz Simrock, sei sein Lebenswerk zum Ausgangspunkt zurückgekehrt: „Das letzte der Volkslieder und dasselbe in meinem op. 1 stellen die Schlange vor, die sich in den Schwanz beißt.“

Alle drei Klaviersonaten von Brahms beginnen mit einer grandiosen Geste, die sich über den gesamten Umfang der Tastatur erstreckt. Im Fall der Klaviersonate C-Dur, op. 1, erinnert der Rhythmus des Anfangsthemas deutlich an den Beginn von Beethovens „Hammerklavier-Sonate“, op. 106. Doch gibt es hier auch einen Bezug zu einer anderen Beethoven-Sonate: Brahms wiederholt sein erstes Thema fast sofort um einen Ganzton tiefer, in B-Dur, ebenso wie Beethoven es in der „Waldstein-Sonate“ (ebenfalls C-Dur) gehalten hatte. Brahms’ zweites Thema, in dem das linke Pedal verstärkt zum Einsatz kommt, basiert auf einem ausdrucksstarken, sehnsüchtigen Motiv in a-Moll. Und eben dieses Thema durchdringt die lange zentrale Durchführung, bis Brahms es kontrapunktisch mit dem selbstbewussten Eingangsthema kombiniert. Die Reprise ist überraschend unruhig und unbeständig, wobei das erste Thema verschiedene Tonarten durchläuft, und das zweite wieder in Moll erscheint. Erst kurz vor Ende tritt die Musik triumphierend in C-Dur hervor.

Das Andante ist ein Variationensatz über eine Melodie, die Brahms zufolge auf einem altdeutschen Minnelied basiert—in gleicher Weise gestaltete er auch den langsamen Satz seiner Sonate op. 2. Brahms fand diese Melodien in einer Anthologie, die Andreas Kretzschmer und Anton Wilhelm von Zuccalmaglio in den 1830er Jahren unter dem Titel Deutsche Volkslieder mit ihren Original-Weisen zusammengestellt hatten. Brahms ließ den Text des Liedes unter den Anfangstakten seines langsamen Satzes abdrucken:

Verstohlen geht der Mond auf.
Blau, blau Blümelein!
Durch Silberwölkchen führt sein Lauf.
Blau, blau Blümelein!
Rosen im Thal,
Mädel im Saal,
O schönste Rosa!

Nach drei zunehmend verzierten und freien Variationen fügt Brahms eine ruhige Coda an—eine Art Duett für Tenor und Sopran, womit die „zwei treuen Herzen“ vom Ende des Gedichts angedeutet werden. In den letzten Takten der Coda kommt in einem langsameren Tempo ein Vorgeschmack des Themas des Scherzos, welches sich ohne Pause anschließt. Wie wir noch sehen werden, verwendete Brahms in der Sonate op. 2 ein ähnliches Schema, arbeitete es jedoch noch kunstvoller aus.

Das Scherzo von op. 1, in e-Moll, hat ein schnelleres Trio in der Grundtonart der Sonate, C-Dur. Die aufwärts gerichteten Phrasen des Trios erklingen wellenartig und mit zunehmender Intensität und Dringlichkeit: sie erreichen einen leidenschaftlichen Höhepunkt, bevor sie abklingen und eine eilende Tonleiter die Musik in die Wiederholung des Scherzos sausen lässt.

Dem Finale—ein Rondo—liegt eine rhythmisch verklärte Version des Anfangsthemas des ersten Satzes zugrunde. Damit sind, ebenso wie der langsame Satz und das Scherzo miteinander verbunden sind, auch die Außensätze der Sonate miteinander verknüpft. In der zentralen Episode des Finales in Moll wechselt das Metrum von drei zu zwei Schlägen pro Takt und Brahms lässt eine Melodie erklingen, deren Inspirationsquelle ein Gedicht von Robert Burns war: „My heart’s in the Highlands“. In diesem Falle wird Brahms den Text wohl durch Schumanns übersetzte Vertonung in dem Liederkreis Myrthen kennengelernt haben. Brahms blieb hierbei so nahe am Text, dass er Burns’ Zeilen seiner Melodie unterlegen konnte, und durch das Einarbeiten eines weiteren Volksliedtextes stellt er eine Verbindung zwischen Finale und Andante her. Am Ende dieser Episode lässt Brahms kurze Ausschnitte der Melodie mit Fragmenten des Rondo-Hauptthemas alternieren, bevor das Letztere vollständig wiederkehrt. Eine Coda in schnellerem Tempo führt das Werk zu einem jubelnden Ende.

Ähnlich wie er es mit den Außensätzen der Sonate op. 1 gehalten hatte, verknüpfte Brahms in der Klaviersonate fis-Moll, op. 2, auch die beiden Mittelsätze mit einer Volksliedmelodie. Brahms vertraute seinem Komponistenfreund Albert Dietrich an, dass die Inspirationsquelle für das Andante ein weiteres alten Minnelied, „Mir ist leide“, sei. In der letzten der vier Variationen, aus denen dieser zweite Satz besteht, wechselt die Melodie von Moll nach Dur und zwei scheinbar gegensätzliche Elemente entfalten sich gleichzeitig: die linke Hand übernimmt die Melodie „sempre molto sostenuto“, während die rechte Hand darüber eine Reihe von atemlosen Phrasen „con molt’ agitazione“ spielt. Letzteres ist ein Echo des leidenschaftlichen zweiten Themas des Anfangssatzes, das noch einmal im Finale wiederkehren wird. Im dritten Satz, der sich ohne Pause anschließt, kehrt Brahms nach Moll zurück und präsentiert eine fünfte Variation, die zugleich als Scherzo fungiert: ein äußerst origineller Schachzug, der umso bemerkenswerter ist, wenn man bedenkt, dass die Sonate das Werk eines 19-jährigen Komponisten ist. Nach dem entspannteren Trio des Scherzos mit seinen nachhallenden Hornrufen wird nur die erste Hälfte des Scherzos in seiner ursprünglichen Form wiederholt: der Rest wird von prachtvollen Trillern überlagert, als würden hier die abschließenden Momente des Finales vorweggenommen.

Mit den weit ausholenden Gesten in den Außensätzen wird deutlich, was Schumann meinte, als er Brahms’ Sonaten als „verschleierte Symphonien“ bezeichnete. Direkt nach den kraftvollen Doppeloktaven zu Beginn erklingt tief im Bass ein geheimnisvolles neues Motiv, welches dann zur treibenden Kraft in der restlichen Exposition avanciert—zunächst in Form einer Begleitung zu den atemlosen Phrasen des Beginns des zweiten Themas, und dann, in umgekehrter Form, als leidenschaftliche Melodie, die die Exposition zu Ende führt. Es ist bezeichnend für Brahms’ lebenslanges Streben nach sich stets weiterentwickelnder Musik, dass die Reprise nahtlos aus der Durchführung hervorgeht und dass die Musik erst bei der Wiederholung der zweiten Hälfte des Hauptthemas den Weg zurück in die Grundtonart findet.

Ebenso wie er es später in seinem Klavierquintett f-Moll und in der ersten Sinfonie hielt, stellt Brahms auch hier dem Finale eine langsame Einleitung voran. In diesem improvisatorischen Anfang wird die geschmeidige Form des Hauptthemas des Finales in Zeitlupentempo angekündigt und es erklingen eine Reihe von Trillern und schwungvolle Tonleitern, die ganz am Ende der Sonate wiederkehren werden. Die Konturen des Hauptthemas gehen in die „Zickzack-Figuration“ der begleitenden linken Hand im durchdringenden zweiten Thema über. Brahms beendet die Exposition mit einer kraftvollen Folge von ausgehaltenen Akkorden, die sich zu Beginn des zentralen Abschnitts des Stücks in einen geheimnisvollen Moment der Stille verwandelt, bevor die volle Kraft der Durchführung entfesselt wird. Am Ende löst sich die Spannung der Musik in einer langsamen Coda in Dur auf, in der die Triller und improvisatorischen Schnörkel des Satzanfangs wiederkehren.

Als Brahms’ fis-Moll-Sonate 1854 im Druck erschien, war sie „Frau Clara Schumann verehrend zugeeignet“. Diese Widmung erfolgte nicht ohne eine gewisse Verzagtheit auf seiner Seite—Ende November 1853 hatte er Schumann brieflich um Erlaubnis dazu gebeten: „Dürfte ich meinem zweiten Werke den Namen Ihrer Frau Gemahlin voransetzen? Ich wage es kaum und möchte Ihnen doch so gerne ein kleines Zeichen meiner Verehrung und Dankbarkeit übergeben.“ Und im Februar des folgenden Jahres gestand Brahms in seinem ersten heute überlieferten Brief an Clara: „Ich habe gewagt, der Sonate Ihren Namen voran zu setzen. Möchten Sie es nicht so unbescheiden finden, als ich jetzt; kaum wage ich sie Ihnen zu schicken.“ So mag Brahms’ Klaviersonate op. 2 wohl als Beginn einer Beziehung gelten, die bis zu Clara Schumanns Tod über 40 Jahre später—am 20. Mai 1896, weniger als ein Jahr vor Brahms’ eigenem Tod—währte.

Die 2 Rhapsodien, op. 79, entstanden 1879: über ein Vierteljahrhundert nach den Klaviersonaten. Auf das impulsive Eingangsthema der ersten Rhapsodie h-Moll folgt eine zarte Melodie im Pianissimo, die schon bald von der energischen Rückkehr des Anfangsthemas beiseitegeschoben wird. Die neue Melodie, die nun kurz aufleuchtet, bildet die Grundlage für den tröstlichen Mittelteil in Dur. Sie kehrt noch einmal in der linken Hand in der Coda wieder, die sich der Reprise des ersten Abschnitts anschließt.

Bei op. 79 Nr. 2 handelt es sich um einen Sonatensatz samt Wiederholung der Exposition. Der letzte Abschnitt der Exposition wird von einer konstant pendelnden kleinen Sekunde in einer Mittelstimme begleitet, und dieselbe unveränderliche Pendelbewegung prägt die gesamte zweite Hälfte der Durchführung. Sie kehrt zudem in den letzten Momenten des Stücks wieder, wo sie dann allmählich langsamer wird und verebbt, bevor eine heißblütige Schlusskadenz für ein abruptes Ende sorgt.

Misha Donat © 2021
Deutsch: Viola Scheffel

Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...