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Track(s) taken from CDA67704

O Lord, make thy servant Elizabeth

composer
author of text

Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)
Recording details: June 2008
All Hallows, Gospel Oak, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Jeremy Summerly
Engineered by Simon Eadon
Release date: October 2008
Total duration: 2 minutes 43 seconds

Cover artwork: Portrait of Elizabeth I.
The Deanery, Westminster Abbey / Copyright Dean and Chapter of Westminster
 
1
O Lord, make thy servant Elizabeth  [2'43]

Other recordings available for download

The Tallis Scholars, Peter Phillips (conductor)
The Tallis Scholars, Peter Phillips (conductor)
Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)

Reviews

'The beauties of this disc of 16th century choral music are many and various. The repertoire's selection and arrangement is inspired, the singing some of the best I've heard on CD … as a showcase for English choral singing at its most charismatic, this deserves to be widely heard' (Gramophone)

'The Choir of Westminster Abbey sings fresh, committed and emotionally compelling accounts. Many overpowering moments take place during Mundy's Vox Patris Caelestis … James O'Donnell shapes vocal lines with a keen sense of drama … the brilliance of the programming matches that of the singing' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Sheppard's sublime Libera nos unfolds like a hothouse flower amid other blooms from Tye, Tallis, Mundy and White' (The Observer)

'This latest addition to Hyperion's excellent Westminster Abbey series presents a fascinating snapshot of the musical upheavals created by Queen Mary's death and Elizabeth I's accession in 1558. Sheppard's Second Evening Service, composed in that year in a syllabic yet sonorously polyphonic style, marks the watershed between richly textured and highly elaborated Latin pieces, such as Mundy's Vox Patris caelestis, and the beautiful simplicity of Byrd's Teach me, O Lord. Recusant musical activity is also represented by Byrd's profoundly moving Ne irascaris' (The Daily Telegraph)

'The energy in the boys' voices is thrilling: they sear through the complex texture with evangelical zeal … this recording showcases the contrasts of style which made the 16th century such a fertile period of composition, and shows how the tradition of singing services at Westminster Abbey has continued unbroken for so many centuries' (Early Music Review)

'This is spectacularly fine singing, with James O'Donnell's obvious affection for the repertoire drawing from both boys and men some exquisite performances … the Westminster choir's most beautiful release to date' (International Record Review)

'In this brilliantly conceived programme … O'Donnell's superlative choir are peerless' (The Sunday Times)
Byrd joined Queen Elizabeth’s Chapel Royal in 1572, and probably wrote this anthem a few years later. Its text comes from Psalm 21, but has been customized to address Elizabeth by name. Following the queen’s death in 1603, the words of the anthem had to be changed to match the name of each succeeding monarch; but since 1952, by pleasing coincidence, Byrd’s original text is once again relevant.

from notes by John Milsom 2013

Other albums featuring this work

Byrd: The Great Service
CDGIM011
Byrd: Playing Elizabeth's Tune
Studio Master: CDGIM992Please, someone, buy me …Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Byrd: The Great Service & other works
CDA67533
Byrd: The Tallis Scholars sing William Byrd
CDGIM2082CDs for the price of 1
Renaissance Radio
CDGIM2122CDs for the price of 1
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