Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Click cover art to view larger version
Track(s) taken from CDA66669

Nunc dimittis, H127

composer
1915; composed for Richard Runciman Terry and the choir of Westminster Cathedral who gave the first performance in Easter Sunday 1915; not published until 1979 (edited by Imogen Holst)
author of text
Luke 2: 29-32

Westminster Cathedral Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)
Recording details: June 1993
St Jude-on-the-Hill, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Antony Howell
Release date: November 1993
Total duration: 3 minutes 31 seconds
 
1
Nunc dimittis H127  [3'31]

Other recordings available for download

St Paul's Cathedral Choir, John Scott (conductor)
Holst Singers, Hilary Davan Wetton (conductor)

Reviews

'A beautiful disc of sacred motets from one of this country’s finest choirs' (Classic FM Magazine)

'What can one say? A feast beyond all dreams. Guaranteed to please' (Organists' Review)
The unaccompanied Nunc dimittis, H127, was written in 1915 and remained in manuscript form until 1979 when a published edition appeared, revised by the composer’s daughter, Imogen Holst. For soprano and tenor soloists and unaccompanied eight-part choir, the piece was written for Richard Terry, then organist of Westminster Cathedral. It was first performed liturgically on Easter Sunday, 1915, after which it was totally forgotten. The first performance of the revised version was given by the BBC Singers under Stephen Wilkinson on 11 June 1974 in Framlington Church.

Holst was passionate about the music of Byrd and Palestrina, which is clearly shown here in the modal writing, and the way the male and female voices of the choir answer each other antiphonally as, for example, at the words ‘Lumen ad revelationem gentium’. The piece was originally composed in B flat, although for the revised version recorded here the music was transposed down a semitone to A. It makes a fitting conclusion to this recital of wonderful but little-known music whose current neglect is as baffling as it is inexcusable.

from notes by Julian Haylock 1989

Other albums featuring this work

Epiphany at St Paul's
CDH55443
Holst: The Evening Watch & other choral works
CDH55170
The Music of Westminster Cathedral
This album is not yet available for downloadWCC100Super-budget price sampler
Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.