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Track(s) taken from CDD22001

Brandenburg Concerto No 3 in G major, BWV1048

composer

The Brandenburg Consort, Roy Goodman (conductor)
Recording details: October 1991
All Saints' Church, East Finchley, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Martin Compton
Engineered by Antony Howell
Release date: September 1992
Total duration: 12 minutes 3 seconds

Cover artwork: Instruments de Musique by Jean-Baptiste Oudry (1686-1755)
 
1
[Allegro]  [5'20]
2
3
Allegro  [4'48]

Other recordings available for download

Dunedin Consort, John Butt (conductor)

Reviews

'This splendid set is a dazzling companion to The Brandenburg Consort's recording of the Bach Orchestral Suites' (CDReview)
The third concerto comes closest to fulfilling the ‘agreement’ definition of the concerto, with the opening movement comprising the interplay of the three choirs of three violins, violas and cellos and the last retaining the format of three violins and violas but with the cellos consolidated with the continuo. What is sacrificed in terms of solo virtuosity is amply compensated by the fleet interplay of forces, a kaleidoscopic celebration of the entire violin family.

The first movement is loosely based on the type of da capo form associated with sonatas. But here there is also an overall sense of dramatic intensification during the course of the movement, and the return of the opening section is modified with new gestures and some unexpected turns of event. The two cadential chords constituting the second movement (‘Adagio’) certainly do not refer to a piece that has since been lost since they come on the middle of a page in the presentation autograph. Perhaps, given the complexity and intensity of the movements on either side, they should be played precisely as they stand, as if the slow movement has simply vaporised. Or perhaps, in the manner of Handel’s later organ concertos, they signify a solo improvisation. There is certainly a sense throughout the collection that Bach played on the expectations and conventions of concerto writing, and here is an opportunity to render this movement in a number of different ways.

The third movement is, unusually for Bach’s finales, a piece in binary form with each of the two halves repeated. Here there is a definite element of virtuosity, but transferred from the customary soloist to the entire ensemble. Never again in the history of the concerto has there been such a piece that maintains the dazzle of the concerto idiom without profiling a single soloist.

from notes by John Butt 2013

Other albums featuring this work

Bach: Brandenburg Concertos
Studio Master: CKD430Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available