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Track(s) taken from CDA67586

Psalm 132

First line:
Lord, remember David: and all his trouble
composer
author of text
Psalm 132

Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor), Robert Quinney (organ)
Recording details: February 2006
Westminster Abbey, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Jeremy Summerly
Engineered by Simon Eadon
Release date: September 2006
Total duration: 4 minutes 28 seconds
 
Matins
1

Reviews

'Anglican music can be heard at its best from Westminster Abbey … a varied programme stylishly performed' (Choir & Organ)

'Early notice is served of how well the Abbey's choristers are currently singing … an admirably varied programme, with excellent Hyperion recording' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Exhilarating performances' (The Daily Telegraph)

'As with the previous releases in this series, the choir (and organist Robert Quinney, who here ends the disc in spectacular fashion with Jeanne Demessieux's Te Deum), under the fluent direction of James O'Donnell, is above reproach' (International Record Review)

'After eight years James O'Donnell has brought a new sound to the choir of Westminster Abbey. The boys show the greater improvement, a firmer, more solid tone, but the men also now sound like the best adult choirs … the acoustics of the Gothic building are superb, and the organ makes magnificent sounds' (Fanfare, USA)

'The range of musical styles is as varied as could be … the standard of singing and recording is fully equal to such demanding music, but it is equally satisfying to hear psalms and familiar canticles, Stanford in C (Morning) and Purcell in G minor (Evening) performed with such loving care. An excellent disc, highly recommended' (Cathedral Music)
In monastic tradition the Psalms were the core of the daily Offices and the monks sang all 150 Psalms during the course of each week. The Anglican reformers spread the Psalter over a monthly cycle, although Proper Psalms are allocated to certain festivals. The chant by William Crotch used here for Psalm 132 is of particular nobility and poise, in keeping with its uplifting text. As in monastic practice the verses are sung in alternation between the two sides of the choir.

from notes by James O'Donnell © 2006

La tradition monastique plaçait les psaumes au cœur des offices quotidiens et, chaque semaine, les moines chantaient l’intégralité des cent cinquante psaumes. Puis les réformateurs anglicans répartirent le psautier en un cycle mensuel, non sans allouer des psaumes du propre à certaines fêtes. La psalmodie de William Crotch utilisée ici pour le psaume 132 est d’une noblesse et d’une grâce toute particulières, en phase avec ce texte édifiant. Conformément à la pratique monacale, les versets sont chantés en alternance entre les deux côtés du chœur.

extrait des notes rédigées par James O'Donnell © 2006
Français: Hypérion

In der monastischen Tradition standen die Psalmen im Zentrum der täglichen Offizien und innerhalb jeder Woche sangen die Mönche alle 150 Psalmen. Die anglikanischen Reformierer erstreckten die Psalmen über einen monatlichen Zyklus, obwohl bestimmten Festtagen reguläre Psalmen zugeordnet wurden. Der Satz von William Crotch, der hier für Psalm 132 verwendet wird, besitzt im Einklang mit seinem feierlichen Text besonders erhabene Eleganz. Wie in der monastischen Praxis üblich werden die Verse im Wechselgesang zwischen den beiden Chören gesungen.

aus dem Begleittext von James O'Donnell © 2006
Deutsch: Renate Wendel

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