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Track(s) taken from CDA66867

Clarifica me, Pater

composer
author of text
Canticle Antiphon at Lauds on Monday or Tuesday of Holy Week

A Capella Portuguesa, Owen Rees (conductor)
Recording details: February 1996
St Jude-on-the-Hill, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Martin Compton
Engineered by Tony Faulkner
Release date: September 1996
Total duration: 5 minutes 14 seconds
 
1
Clarifica me, Pater  [5'14]

Reviews

'Stunningly beautiful' (Organists' Review)

'Disco absolutamente recomendable a todos los amigos de la polifonia, qie se encontraran con 73 minutos de buena musica bellamente interpretada' (CD Compact, Spain)
The four-voice Clarifica me Pater by Giovanni Giorgi is an extended setting divided into two partes of the short antiphon for the canticle of Lauds on Tuesday of Holy Week; the Vila Viçosa source places it as an Offertory motet for the Monday. Giorgi, identified as João Jorge in Portuguese sources, came to Lisbon from Rome in about 1725 and had an active role in the Italian domination of music in Lisbon at the time. Unlike most of his music which, in the current style, used instrumental accompaniment and interludes, this motet is a freely-developed imitative piece in a stile antico dressed in an eighteenth-century harmonic idiom, often with changing harmonies over an anchoring pedal point, and characterized by long melismas on prominent vowels. A contrast to the continuous imitation is a passage with repeated homophonic injunctions of ‘apud te’ (thus – curiously – treating the first syllable of the word ‘temetipsum’ separately) for dramatic emphasis.

from notes by Bernadette Nelson 1996

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