Please wait...

Hyperion Records

Click cover art to view larger version
Untitled painting (2001) by Monika Giller-Lenz
Track(s) taken from CDA67320
Recording details: August 2001
Henry Wood Hall, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Andrew Keener
Engineered by Tony Faulkner
Release date: August 2002
Total duration: 2 minutes 48 seconds

'Stimulating and frequently astonishing music, ultimately unlike anyone else's' (BBC Music Magazine)

'A tremendous tribute to a fascinating figure in 20th-century music' (The Daily Telegraph)

'Marc-André Hamelin plays magisterially, as ever. He clearly loves this music' (International Record Review)

'This is an essential release…realized with the dazzling virtuosity and preternatural clarity that we have come to expect from the enterprising Canadian … this exhausting, diverse, and technically astonishing recording is not one that I would gladly be without' (Fanfare, USA)

'Marc-André Hamelin plays Ornstein’s music with commanding savoir-faire' (The Irish Times)

'A provocative collection, brilliantly played and splendidly engineered' (International Piano)

'Marc-André Hamelin is spellbinding in his performance … This CD is an outstanding example of astonishing music' (Hi-Fi Plus)

'It almost goes without saying that Marc-André Hamelin plays the socks off this music, tackling the most knuckle-busting runs and cluster harmonies in Danse Sauvage and its fellow pieces with staggering virtuosity.' (ClassicsToday.com)

'Marc-André Hamelin, aussi à l’aise dans les déferlements rythmiques que dans les moments suspendus du temps, nous offer là un disque superbe' (Répertoire, France)

Danse sauvage, Op 13 No 2
composer

Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Danse sauvage—which bristles with extremist indications such as Presto con fuoco, il più marcato possibile, Furioso, Prestissimo; and fffs abound—takes the basic premise of a waltz and subjects it to relentless ironic exaggeration: it is both comic and disturbing at the same time, with the kind of insight that suggests a kind of madness. Ornstein described the piece as a ‘picture of primordial beings in all the savage abandonment of the wildest of corybantic revels’.

from notes by Martin Anderson © 2002

Show: MP3 FLAC ALAC
   English   Français   Deutsch