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Track(s) taken from CDP12105

God be in my head

composer
author of text
Book of Hours, 1514, in English in the Sarum Primer of 1558

Wells Cathedral Choir, Malcolm Archer (conductor), Rupert Gough (organ)
Recording details: November 2003
Wells Cathedral, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Julian Millard
Release date: August 2004
Total duration: 1 minutes 40 seconds
 
1
God be in my head  [1'40]

Reviews

'The Wells Cathedral Choir again shows its stuff—and it's glorious … because of this choir's sturdy, full-bodied singing, both exuberant and reverent, and its natural, sensible, unaffected phrasing and enunciation. Hymn lovers need no encouragement or further discussion; these inspiring texts and timeless tunes speak for themselves' (ClassicsToday.com)
These beautiful words need no commentary. They appear to go back to a French original of 1490. A number of tunes have been written for these words, and anthem settings abound, but this setting by Walford Davies holds the field. It was published in a leaflet in 1910 and gained wider currency by being included in the Festival Service Book of the London Church Choir Association in 1912.

Walford Davies had an immensely distinguished and influential career at a time when English music was beginning to be something to be proud of on an international stage. He was organist of The Temple Church and of St George’s Windsor; Professor of Music at Aberystwyth; Master of the King’s Music. He composed a great deal in many forms, but little of this is now performed. His greatest influence was as a choirmaster, teacher, adjudicator, musical educator, and above all as a popularizer of good music. His hymn singing broadcasts in the early years of the war are fondly remembered. This setting is utterly characteristic of his melodic and harmonic style.

from notes by Alan Luff 2004

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