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Track(s) taken from CDP12103

Palms of glory

First line:
Palms of glory, raiment bright
composer
NEH 230ii
author of text

Wells Cathedral Choir, Malcolm Archer (conductor), Rupert Gough (organ)
Recording details: June 2002
Wells Cathedral, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Julian Millard
Release date: September 2002
Total duration: 2 minutes 13 seconds
 
All Saints
1

Reviews

'The voices are magnificent; likewise the organ. The whole record is a delight' (Gramophone)

'There is nothing in this collection that is not worth hearing and much to treasure' (Cross Rhythms)
James Montgomery is our greatest lay hymn-writer. He was a journalist, owner and editor for many years of the Sheffield Iris, where he championed policies and views not popular with authority. Indeed he was twice put in prison for short periods because of this. Having begun life as a Moravian, he became a Methodist and ended as an Anglican. He wrote this hymn for the Sheffield Sunday School and it was used at their Anniversary in 1829. It is unassuming in style, yet its theme is the astounding scenes, recounted in the book Revelation, of the worship of heaven itself. Perhaps we see something of the radical journalist here too as the might of Church and State set aside their earthly status to join in the song.

William Maclagan began his life as a soldier in India. Having been invalided out, he was ordained, served a number of churches in London, became Bishop of Lichfield and Archbishop of York. He wrote a number of modest hymn tunes.

from notes by Alan Luff 2002

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