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Hyperion Records

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Towards Grandborough (2004) by Ann Brain (b1944)
Private Collection / Bridgeman Art Library, London
Track(s) taken from CDS44311/3
Recording details: April 1997
Winchester Cathedral, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Antony Howell & Julian Millard
Release date: May 1998
Total duration: 7 minutes 59 seconds

'Hill and the Winchester Choir are superb. The choral tone is luscious, the discipline outstanding, the recording captures the sumptuous acoustics of the cathedral without blurring the musical details, and the performances are vivid and exciting yet carefully nuanced' (American Record Guide)

'My congratulations on a very fine achievement' (Classic CD)

'Superb performances, supremely fine singing, magnificently directed. A delight for Stanford lovers' (Organists' Review)

For lo, I raise up, Op 145
composer
1914
author of text
Habakkuk 1: 6-12; 2: 1-3, 14, 20, adapted

Other recordings available for download
Worcester Cathedral Choir, Donald Hunt (conductor), Paul Trepte (organ)
St Paul's Cathedral Choir, John Scott (conductor), Andrew Lucas (organ)
Introduction
For lo, I raise up, Op 145, Stanford’s most dramatic anthem, was composed in 1914. Through the analogy of Habakkuk’s prophetic writings, Stanford sought to express his own sense of horror at the war, of its needless destruction and of future deliverance. This is powerfully evident in the first part of the anthem, set in F minor, in which the restless choral lines are tossed about by the turbulent (quasi-orchestral) organ accompaniment. Yet, although initially Habakkuk’s text (taken from chapters one and two) is infused with a sense of woe, its conclusion is concerned with hope and the fulfilment of God’s purpose. In the certainty that all enemies shall be vanquished with the establishment of God’s order, Habakkuk’s message is one of consolation, a sentiment that is affirmed in Stanford’s climactic cadential phrase ‘We shall not die’. Building on this declaration of spiritual confidence the momentum increases, animated by a sense of divine destiny (‘The vision is yet for the appointed time’) and an impassioned acclamation of faith (‘For the earth shall be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord’) which is tempered only by the sudden and compelling stillness of the coda (‘But the Lord is in his holy temple’). Here the memories of violence and dread are dissolved in a vision of peace and awe.

from notes by Jeremy Dibble 1998


Other albums featuring this work
'Stanford: Cathedral Music' (CDA66030)
Stanford: Cathedral Music
MP3 £3.50FLAC £3.50ALAC £3.50Buy by post £13.99 (ARCHIVE SERVICE) CDA66030  Archive Service   Download currently discounted
'The English Anthem, Vol. 6' (CDA66826)
The English Anthem, Vol. 6

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