Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Click cover art to view larger version
Track(s) taken from CDA66030

For lo, I raise up, Op 145

composer
1914
author of text
Habakkuk 1: 6-12; 2: 1-3, 14, 20, adapted

Worcester Cathedral Choir, Donald Hunt (conductor), Paul Trepte (organ)
Recording details: July 1981
Worcester Cathedral, United Kingdom
Produced by Simon Perry
Engineered by Tony Faulkner
Release date: May 1988
Total duration: 8 minutes 29 seconds

Cover artwork: Worcester Cathedral, from a watercolour by William Callow (1812-1908)
Reproduced by kind permission of The Worcester City Museum Service
 
1
For lo, I raise up Op 145  [8'29]

Other recordings available for download

St Paul's Cathedral Choir, John Scott (conductor), Andrew Lucas (organ)
Kenan Burrows (treble), William Kendall (tenor), Winchester Cathedral Choir, Stephen Farr (organ), David Hill (conductor)

Reviews

'A prestigious disc' (The Monthly Guide to Recorded Music)
For lo, I raise up, Op 145, Stanford’s most dramatic anthem, was composed in 1914. Through the analogy of Habakkuk’s prophetic writings, Stanford sought to express his own sense of horror at the war, of its needless destruction and of future deliverance. This is powerfully evident in the first part of the anthem, set in F minor, in which the restless choral lines are tossed about by the turbulent (quasi-orchestral) organ accompaniment. Yet, although initially Habakkuk’s text (taken from chapters one and two) is infused with a sense of woe, its conclusion is concerned with hope and the fulfilment of God’s purpose. In the certainty that all enemies shall be vanquished with the establishment of God’s order, Habakkuk’s message is one of consolation, a sentiment that is affirmed in Stanford’s climactic cadential phrase ‘We shall not die’. Building on this declaration of spiritual confidence the momentum increases, animated by a sense of divine destiny (‘The vision is yet for the appointed time’) and an impassioned acclamation of faith (‘For the earth shall be filled with the knowledge of the glory of the Lord’) which is tempered only by the sudden and compelling stillness of the coda (‘But the Lord is in his holy temple’). Here the memories of violence and dread are dissolved in a vision of peace and awe.

from notes by Jeremy Dibble 1998

Other albums featuring this work

Stanford: Sacred Choral Music
CDS44311/33CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
The English Anthem, Vol. 6
CDA66826Archive Service
Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...
Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.