Please wait...

Hyperion Records

Click cover art to view larger version
Two Haloed Mourners (Fragment from The Burial of St John the Baptist) by Aretino Spinello (active 1373-died c1410)
Reproduced by permission of The Trustees, The National Gallery, London
Track(s) taken from CDH55436
Recording details: June 1996
St Paul's Cathedral, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Antony Howell & Julian Millard
Release date: February 1997
Total duration: 8 minutes 2 seconds

'This is one of the most impressive discs I can recall from this choir' (Fanfare, USA)

Te Deum in C
composer
1934; written for Maurice Vinden and the choir of St Mark's, North Audley Street, London, who gave the first performance in 27 January 1936
author of text
Book of Common Prayer

Other recordings available for download
Westminster Abbey Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor), Robert Quinney (organ), Yeachan Park (treble)
Holst Singers, Stephen Layton (conductor), David Goode (organ)
Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Benjamin Britten’s early Te Deum in C dates from 1934 and is the first of two settings of that text in his small output of church music. It is an effective work of great economy and formal clarity. From the outset the organ asserts itself as equal partner to the choir which grows from a hushed beginning with a simple chord of C major, edgily underpinned by the organ pedals’ bell-like marcato, into a dramatic cry of ‘Holy, Holy, Holy Lord God of Sabaoth’, at which point the music suddenly leaves C major for the first time, eventually settling gently into a peaceful A major. Now a treble soloist takes over (‘Thou art the King of glory, O Christ’), the organ pedal motif still in evidence, and the choir gently echoing the words ‘O Christ’. At ‘O Lord, save thy people’ the opening sound and style returns, skilfully using the basic chord of C major to build tension and excitement towards the climax ‘And we worship thy Name’ and animato coda (‘Vouchsafe, O Lord: to keep us this day without sin’), giving way finally to the serene ‘let me never be confounded’ which returns us to the low-lying C major with which we began.

from notes by James O'Donnell © 2005


Other albums featuring this work
'Britten: Christ's Nativity & other choral works' (CDA66825)
Britten: Christ's Nativity & other choral works
'Trinity Sunday at Westminster Abbey' (CDA67557)
Trinity Sunday at Westminster Abbey

Show: MP3 FLAC ALAC
   English   Français   Deutsch