Please wait...

Hyperion Records

Click cover art to view larger version
The Kermesse (c1638/8) by Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640)
Louvre, Paris / Bridgeman Art Library, London
Track(s) taken from CKD430
Recording details: May 2012
Perth Concert Hall, Scotland
Produced by Philip Hobbs
Engineered by Philip Hobbs & Robert Cammidge
Release date: September 2013
Total duration: 14 minutes 35 seconds

'Notwithstanding the distinguished Brandenburg discography, this set is nothing short of sensational' (Gramophone) » More

'These period instruments performances are refreshingly free from dogma and naturally embrace criteria believed to serve Bach's music best. Melodic ideas are beautifully punctuated and phrased, vibrato is used strictly ornamentally, and tempos strike my sensibilities as pretty well ideal. Perhaps what I like most of all, though, is an all-pervading atmosphere of intimate and convivial dialogue in which all the strands and multifarious colours emerge effortlessly from the full texture' (BBC Music Magazine) » More

'Certainly, the sixth is one of the revelations in this set … transformed into a profoundly expressive study in texture and articulation, with the string lines effortlessly and naturally interlaced … this set is exceptional' (The Guardian) » More

'Even at the first hearing, it is remarkable to find that this over-familiar music often sounds so different as to immediately captivate and engross the listener in a myriad different and unexpected ways, all of them refreshing and illuminating … no matter how many times you've heard the Brandenburg Concertos before, these readings have that rare capacity to make you feel you're hearing them afresh for the very first time' (International Record Review) » More

Brandenburg Concerto No 4 in G major, BWV1049
composer

Allegro  [6'45]
Andante  [3'20]
Presto  [4'30]

Other recordings available for download
The Brandenburg Consort, Roy Goodman (conductor)
Introduction
The fourth concerto opens with an extensive section which not only introduces the basic material for the movement but also reveals the instrumental argument: a solo group is contrasted with the rest of the orchestra and within this solo group there is a dialogue between the two recorders and the violin. This functions as a microcosm of the work as a whole, containing its own contrasts, departures and returns; only at the end of the movement do we hear it again complete. Rather than simply confining the solos to the episodes, Bach dislocates the solo argument from the ritornello structure: we simply cannot predict when the soloists will be strongly profiled, they are continually weaving in and out of the larger orchestral texture.

The second movement introduces a new concept in Bach’s concertos: here there is a close dialogue between the solo group and the tutti in which the contrast is highlighted by dynamics rather than melodic material. The piece thus plays on the concepts of repetition, together with light and shade. With the final movement we hear yet another interpretation of the concerto style: the opening ritornello is essentially a fugue, the subject of which can subsequently be used in a variety of ways. Indeed there are only a few places where it is entirely absent. Thus the expected contrast of ritornello and episode is replaced by frequent contrasts of instrumentation, the fuller expositions of the subject providing the tutti sonority usually associated with the ritornello. Furthermore another traditional feature of the concerto – virtuosity – is provided by the violin part, something which by its very nature turns a fugue – brilliant enough on its own terms – into a dazzling concerto movement.

from notes by John Butt 2013


Other albums featuring this work
'Bach: The Brandenburg Concertos' (CDD22001)
Bach: The Brandenburg Concertos
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £10.50 CDD22001  2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)  

Show: MP3 FLAC ALAC
   English   Français   Deutsch