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Track(s) taken from CDH55436

In Exitu Israel 'Psalm 114'

First line:
When Israel came out of Egypt
composer
1929
author of text
Psalm 114

St Paul's Cathedral Choir, John Scott (conductor), Andrew Lucas (organ)
Recording details: June 1996
St Paul's Cathedral, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Antony Howell & Julian Millard
Release date: February 1997
Total duration: 2 minutes 44 seconds

Cover artwork: Two Haloed Mourners (Fragment from The Burial of St John the Baptist) by Aretino Spinello (active 1373-died c1410)
Reproduced by permission of The Trustees, The National Gallery, London
 
Easter
1

The same straightforward approach seen in The Lamentation can be found in Bairstow’s setting of Psalm 114 In Exitu Israel, where the conventional Anglican psalm-chant undergoes modification with dramatic results. In this case a single chant undergoes a series of variants. These include the dramatic fortissimo at the words ‘Tremble, thou earth’, together with a 32-foot pedal reed stop and the unusual treatment of the words ‘springing well’. This psalm-chant first appeared in the York Minster chant book in 1929. One of Bairstow’s favourite devices is employed to good effect in both The Lamentation and Psalm 114—that of a sudden excursion into the flats: in The Lamentation the key of A flat major was used at the words ‘Remember, O Lord, what is come upon us’, and in Psalm 114 this takes the form of an unexpected harmonic shift at the words ‘What ailest thee, O thou sea, that thou fleddest’.

from notes by William McVicker 1997

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