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Hyperion Records

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Track(s) taken from CDA67556
Recording details: May 2005
Henry Wood Hall, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Andrew Keener
Engineered by Simon Eadon
Release date: July 2006
Total duration: 18 minutes 13 seconds

'These are beautifully judged performances, generally fleeter of foot, airier of texture and more intimate in tone with an ideal balance between the instruments' (Gramophone)

'Superb execution … another feather in the Florestan Trio's cap' (International Record Review)

'Susan Tomes’s sprightly piano is in its element, leading the dance in these three mature trios … moods change at a flick of Mozart’s wrist, and Tomes, Anthony Marwood and Richard Lester have all the flexibility needed' (The Times)

'As in all their artistic endeavours, this outstanding disc of Mozart piano trios from the acclaimed Florestan Trio demonstrates a delightfully unforced lyricism coupled with the most exquisite, long-lined phrasing … sample the luminous performance of the central Andante grazioso of the E major Trio K542 to hear chamber music playing of the very highest order' (HMV Choice)

'The Florestan Trio makes this lovely music shimmer with dazzling facility. These are seasoned Mozart interpretations of high order' (Audiophile Audition, USA)

'The Florestan Trio's accounts of the Third, Fourth, and Sixth trios set reference standards for stylish perception, textural transparency, and the kind of sophisticated articulation and motivic interplay that may be preplanned, yet never seems intellectualized … Hyperion's clear, full-bodied, and impeccably-balanced engineering deserves its own rave review' (ClassicsToday.com)

'The Florestan Trio, with pianist Susan Tomes at her most beguiling, give a scintillating account of three mature Mozart piano trios on this disc … whatever the technical intensity of the constituent roles Mozart demands of them, Antony Marwood and Richard Lester are well aware of how to make the best of their contributions. This is musical team-work of a very high order' (The Cambridge Society)

'The Florestan Trio, whose recording of Mozart Piano Trios prove an unmitigated delight' (Secrets, Australia)

'A delight … its virtues, of course, were no surprise. Susan Tomes' Mozartian credentials were richly established with her 2004 recording of the Piano Concertos K413-415 on Hyperion CDA67358 … performances as fine as anything ever released of these enchanting works. She is a pianist, and artist, of the front rank' (Piano, Germany)

Piano Trio in G major, K564
composer
October 1788

Allegro  [7'44]
Andante  [5'52]
Allegretto  [4'37]

Other recordings available for download
London Fortepiano Trio
Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
In October 1788, Mozart wrote his last work in the genre, the Piano Trio in G major K564. It is a sign of the times that it was first published in England, not in Vienna. And it is a sign of the conservative tastes of publishers and public that, when it was finally issued in Vienna the following year, it was still advertised, like its predecessors, as being ‘for harpsichord or forte piano with the accompaniment of a violin and violoncello’. Mozart may have led the new fashion for the piano, but many households still had their harpsichords, and the predominant model for piano trios was still the ‘accompanied sonatas’, which Haydn was to continue writing long after Mozart’s death in 1791.

Indeed, this trio has a rather more ‘domestic’ feel than those Mozart wrote earlier in the year. It is simpler and shorter, perhaps aimed deliberately at the amateur market rather than for Mozart himself to play. Some writers have been disappointed to find this lighter work at the end of Mozart’s sequence of trios, and it is true that it says what it has to say without unnecessary complication. But Mozart at his most direct is just as difficult to play as Mozart at his most subtle and complex. He gives the impression of having put every note in precisely the right place, creating elegant and lyrical structures that require absolute clarity and precision. And if one imagines eavesdropping on friends playing at home, rather than the formality of concert presentation, this elegant and charming piece seems completely in its element.

The first movement is a fluent and rippling Allegro, with a second theme which is very closely related to the first, and a middle section that, rather than develop existing material, starts with an entirely new theme (as in the earlier two trios). These are examples of the subtle ways in which Mozart subverts expectations, even in an apparently straightforward piece of music. The Andante is a set of variations on a melody almost like a slow minuet, though with a hint of sadness in the harmonies of its last few bars. And the finale opens with a naïve little tune in the dotted rhythm of a siciliano. Its very simplicity enables Mozart to suggest shifts of mood with the deftest of touches: a move to a minor key clouds the atmosphere while maintaining the lively rhythm; another episode swings the music into a peasant dance. And the ending is a delight, with the instruments answering each other in wistful counterpoint, suggesting, as so often in Mozart, that deeper thoughts were all the time lurking beneath the tranquil surface.

from notes by Robert Philip © 2006


Other albums featuring this work
'Mozart: Piano Trios K502 & 564' (CDA66125)
Mozart: Piano Trios K502 & 564
MP3 £4.99FLAC £4.99ALAC £4.99Buy by post £13.99 (ARCHIVE SERVICE) CDA66125  Archive Service; also available on CDS44021/3  
'Mozart: Six Piano Trios' (CDS44021/3)
Mozart: Six Piano Trios
MP3 £11.25FLAC £11.25ALAC £11.25Buy by post £41.97 (ARCHIVE SERVICE) CDS44021/3  3CDs Boxed set (at a special price) — Archive Service   Download currently discounted

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