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Track(s) taken from CDA66668

Ding dong! merrily on high

composer
1588; Orchésographie, Langres
composer
harmonization
author of text

Westminster Cathedral Choir, James O'Donnell (conductor)
Recording details: May 1993
All Hallows, Gospel Oak, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Antony Howell
Release date: October 1993
Total duration: 1 minutes 52 seconds
 

Other recordings available for download

The Cambridge Singers, John Rutter (conductor)
Voces 8
Armonico Consort, Christopher Monks (conductor)
Vox Turturis, Andrew Gant (conductor)
St John's College Choir Cambridge, Andrew Nethsingha (conductor)
The Choir of the Chapel Royal, Huw Williams (conductor)
King's College Choir Cambridge, Stephen Cleobury (conductor)

Reviews

'An extremely well-sung traditional carol collection. The concert makes a great appeal by the quality of the singing and the beautiful digital recording' (The Penguin Guide to Compact Discs)

'A model of its kind' (The Times)

'Celestial' (San Francisco Examiner)
The present setting of Ding dong! merrily on high is the well-known one with words by G R Woodward and a catchy sixteenth-century French tune harmonized by Charles Wood. The tune is taken from a dance manual called Orchésographie, published in Langres in 1588 by a canon named Jehan Tabourot, who used as a pseudonym the anagrammatic form, Thoinot Arbeau. In the book the dance is described as a ‘branle de l’official’—implying particular vibrancy and exuberance. Charles Wood (1866–1926) was a product of the Royal College of Music and studied composition with Sir Charles Villiers Stanford whom he succeeded as professor of music at Cambridge in 1924. Vaughan Williams was among his pupils. His best-known pieces are his anthems, which include O Thou the central Orb and Expectans expectavi.

from notes by Wadham Sutton © 1993

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