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Hyperion Records

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Track(s) taken from CDA67206
Recording details: May 2000
St Jude-on-the-Hill, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Tony Faulkner
Release date: November 2000
Total duration: 6 minutes 35 seconds

'An appealing collection of choral works from the composer of the celebrated carol, Three Kings from Persian lands afar. Polyphony are perfect advocates of this richly woven choral writing and the solo singing is very fine too' (Gramophone)

'These are superior performances, Layton’s group Polyphony offering refined tone and exceptional precision, together with a careful observation of Cornelius’s dynamics and fluent phrasing' (BBC Music Magazine)

‘Enthusiastically recommended’ (American Record Guide)

'Polyphony sing with solemn beauty. The sound is sumptuous and richly atmospheric' (The Guardian)

'This program offers an exciting trip into what for most listeners will be a world of happy discovery' (ClassicsToday.com)

Drei Psalmlieder, Op 13
composer
No 1: after Sarabande from Bach's French Suite No 1, BWV812; No 2: after Sarabande from Bach's English Suite No 3, BWV808; No 3: after 2nd Minuet from Pach's Partita No 1, BWV825
author of text
No 1: after Psalm 88; No 2: after Psalm 137; No 3: after Psalm 122
author of text

Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
The Drei Psalmlieder, Op 13 (1872) is a collection of three choral songs for four-voiced mixed choir, with texts that Cornelius fashioned after Psalms. They are wonderful examples of his ability to set texts and to rework older music into something new and fresh (see also the Reitermarsch, derived from Schubert). Each of the pieces is based on a different instrumental movement by Bach: ‘Bußlied’ (after Psalm 88) draws on the Sarabande from the French Suite No 1 (BWV812), ‘An Babels Wasserflüssen’ (after Psalm 137) on the Sarabande from the English Suite No 3 (BWV808), and ‘Jerusalem’ (after Psalm 122) on the second Minuet from the Partita No 1 BWV825. Cornelius has retained the musical substance of Bach’s originals, distributed between the four voices (thus the sopranos usually carry the melody). The first two of these miniatures are dark and chromatic, in accordance with Bach’s sarabandes, whereas ‘Jerusalem’ is jubilant and diatonic, set in the manner of a chorale.

from notes by James Deaville © 2000

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