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Hyperion Records

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Track(s) taken from CDA67259
Recording details: January 2001
Winchester Cathedral, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Julian Millard
Release date: May 2001
Total duration: 17 minutes 28 seconds

'Delicious performances of Rutter’s wonderfully approachable and finely crafted vocal writing. The sound, too, is outstanding … roof-raising performances of a representative programme [of] Rutter’s sacred choral music. The artistry of the 25 full-bodied voices of Polyphony is beyond reproach. Greatly enjoyed and strongly recommended' (Gramophone)

'These vibrant performances amply demonstrate the qualities that give the repertoire its lasting and popular appeal … a concert that will bring widespread comfort and joy' (BBC Music Magazine)

'A triumphantly exuberant performance of the Gloria, which deservedly remains one of John Rutter’s most popular works. ‘Come down, O Love divine’, a lyrical, ardent work … beautifully written and sublimely sung … For those who admire Rutter’s work, this disc, performed as it is in such exemplary fashion, will be a festival' (International Record Review)

Gloria
composer
1974
author of text
Ordinary of the Mass

Introduction
Gloria (a concert work, despite the use of a religious text) in fact marks the occasion of Rutter’s very first US engagement. The work was commissioned by the Voices of Mel Olson in Omaha, Nebraska, who invited Rutter to direct the first performance in 1974. The words come from the second section (the Hymn of Praise) of the Ordinary of the Mass, which in the liturgy follows the ‘Kyrie’. The familiar opening words are those of the angels proclaiming the birth of Jesus, as found in the second chapter of Luke’s Gospel. Rutter’s setting is based largely on one of the Gregorian chants with which the text is associated. He describes the three movements as ‘… roughly corresponding to traditional symphonic structure’, the mood of the sections being respectively ‘… exalted, devotional and jubilant by turns’. The use of organ, brass and percussion makes for plenty of Waltonian punch in the outer movements and yet also for a hauntingly ethereal middle section.

from notes by Andrew Green 2001

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