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Track(s) taken from CDA66908

Canzon septimi toni a 8, C172

composer
1597; No 3 of Sacrae Symphoniae

His Majestys Sagbutts & Cornetts
Recording details: March 1997
St Jude-on-the-Hill, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Antony Howell & Julian Millard
Release date: September 1997
Total duration: 3 minutes 23 seconds
 
1

Reviews

'This superb disc … is the very essence of La Serenissima. Masterly performances, alive with authentic detail' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Excellent. The playing is fluent and exhilarating. An excellent recording. The notes are exemplary' (Classic CD)

'Magnificent. The range of color, breadth and depth of sonority and the majestic nobility of the composer's conception are all revealed in a manner even the most expert of modern brass players could not possibly emulate. A superlative disc and a real credit to everyone involved' (Fanfare, USA)

'L'ensemble anglais est aujourd'hui au sommet de son art' (Répertoire, France)
Zarlino describes the 7th mode as apt for texts of a ‘lascivious, angry, or cheerful’ nature, a range of moods that seems to be well represented by both this and the preceding canzona. But whereas No 2 opened with music of deceptive simplicity, the memorably energetic opening of No 3, which the late Denis Arnold described as ‘fizzing like champagne’, is based on repeated notes that both recall the military motifs of the batalla and also point towards Monteverdi’s stile concitato. This leads directly into a sequence of strongly contrasting ideas, including (unusually) two different triplas, the first of which appears twice, and a mournful passage in the ‘dominant minor’ which makes the final recapitulation of the opening section all the more effective.

from notes by Timothy Roberts 1997

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