Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Click cover art to view larger version
Track(s) taken from CDA67450

Overture to Titus Andronicus

composer
Royal College of Music, MS 1172

The Parley of Instruments, Peter Holman (conductor)
Recording details: October 2003
St Jude-on-the-Hill, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Martin Compton
Engineered by Tony Faulkner
Release date: April 2004
Total duration: 4 minutes 28 seconds
 
1
Overture  [2'59]
2
Minuet  [1'29]

Reviews

'The Parley of Instruments, Rachel Brown, director Peter Holman and the Hyperion recording team all deserve applause' (Gramophone)

'With the programme arranged by play rather than chronology, creating an alluring stylistic variety within its 100-or-so-year span, and excellent sound, music for Shakespeare doesn't come much better than this' (BBC Music Magazine)

'I'm sure that if it wasn't for the pioneering series of recordings named The English Orpheus we would find ourselves less the richer for the discoveries this series has brought to our notions of English musical heritage' (The Organ)

'Programmed with Peter Holman's usual ingenuity and originality' (Goldberg)
These pieces come from productions in the London theatres around 1700. Jeremiah Clarke’s fine overture for Titus Andronicus probably dates from 1696, when Ravenscroft’s adaptation of the play was republished. The young composer seems to have come up to London from Winchester to help Daniel Purcell with the music for Christopher Rich’s company at Drury Lane shortly after Henry Purcell’s sudden death in November 1695. It is likely that the two movements come from a complete suite for the play, otherwise lost.

from notes by Peter Holman 2004

Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.