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Track(s) taken from CDA66070

Not all my torments can your pity move, Z400

composer
mid-1693
author of text

Paul Esswood (countertenor), Johann Sonnleitner (harpsichord), Charles Medlam (viola da gamba)
Recording details: October 1981
Unknown, Unknown
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Tony Faulkner
Release date: September 1987
Total duration: 2 minutes 13 seconds

Cover artwork: The Fountain of Love by Jean-Honoré Fragonard (1732-1806)
Reproduced by permission of The Wallace Collection, London
 
1

Other recordings available for download

James Bowman (countertenor), The King's Consort, Robert King (conductor)
Susan Gritton (soprano), The King's Consort
Not all my torments is contained in the Gresham Manuscript, the autograph songbook written out by Purcell between 1692 and 1695. This song comes between movements from the birthday ode of April 1693, Celebrate this festival, and Sawney is a bonny lad, dated 25 January 1694, so may be presumed to have been written around the middle of 1693. Perhaps Purcell’s most florid song, representing the full extent of the ornate Italian influence, it seems strange that he did not include it in any published collection, and neither did it appear in Orpheus Britannicus. Robert Spencer has written that ‘this wonderful song always seems disappointingly short’, musing on whether Purcell planned an aria to follow, or even wrote one which got lost. That said, the four lines of verse do in themselves make a pithy and rather poignant entity which Purcell sets in an astonishingly colourful style, swinging from the impassioned opening, through the manically increasing scorn with which the poet’s love is greeted to the desolate sorrows that he will take to the grave. The rising optimism of the repeated ‘I love’ is countered by the final sting in the tail, ‘I despair’.

from notes by Robert King © 2003

Le texte de Not all my torments can your pity move se prêta à une mise en musique dramatique: la ligne vocale donne l’impression d’un chanteur improvisant des ornements fleuris sur une mélodie simple. Les mélismes sur des termes importants abondent, avec des intervalles hachés pour des mots comme «pity» et un sentiment d’accélération merveilleusement maîtrisé au «increases» répété.

extrait des notes rédigées par Robert King © 1989
Français: Hypérion

Other albums featuring this work

Purcell: Mr Henry Purcell's Most Admirable Composures
CDH55303
Purcell: Secular solo songs, Vol. 2
CDA66720Last few CD copies remainingDownload currently discounted
Purcell: The complete secular solo songs
CDS44161/33CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
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