Please wait...

Hyperion Records

Click cover art to view larger version
Track(s) taken from CKD242
Hereford Cathedral, United Kingdom
Release date: June 2004
Total duration: 73 minutes 36 seconds

'Originally conceived for brass band, Elgar's Severn Suite of 1931 already exists in at least two alternative arrangements for symphony orchestra and solo organ. Now Colm Carey's reworking for two E flat trumpets and organ presents us with a supremely effective third option of which, one suspects, the composer himself would have approved. There's firm enjoyment to be had, too, in the three movements from Strauss's Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme suite … However, the real find here has to be the Rheinberger Suite in C minor, a substantial, 37-minute work from 1887, originally scored for the unusual (unique?) combination of violin, cello and organ (Carey's instrumentation replaces the first two with a piccolo trumpet and B flat trumpet) … this diverting tryptich is by no means only for brass and/or organ aficionados and merits the heartiest of welcomes' (Gramophone) » More

'Colm Carey has done the repertoire-deprived trumpet world a huge service. Virtuoso trumpeters Jonathan Freeman-Attwod and John Wallace join him in Hereford Cathedral for his trumpet duet arrangements of Rheinberger's richly contrapuntal violin and cello sonata, movements from Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, and a reworking of Elgar's Organ Sonata No 2 which evokes the spirit of the Severn Suite. The quality of the solo playing is spell-binding; Carey is assiduous in allowing the trumpets to blossom and blaze in the rich, nutritious loam of Hereford's IV/67 Willis/Harrison organ' (Choir & Organ) » More

'Under the title The Trumpets That Time Forgot, the enterprising Linn label fills Hereford Cathedral with late Romantic music originally written for other instruments: Joseph Rheinberger's suite for violin, cello and organ, Strauss's Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme and Elgar's second organ sonata (once his Severn Suite for brass band). The result is a vivid blend of Gothic splendour and pin-dropping intimacy, as these outstanding players explore a wide dynamic range of lively dialogue and solo lyricism in virtuoso style' (The Observer)

'The fact that none of the three works here started out life as we hear them on this CD matters not a whit, for they all succeed splendidly in their new cladding … the effectiveness of Wallace's and Freeman-Attwood's version might well have convinced [Elgar] as much as it has me … the playing of all three gentlemen is absolutely assured, and the recording, and SACD/CD hybrid, made in the spacious acoustic of Hereford Cathedral, is of demonstration quality' (International Record Review) » More

Suite for organ, violin and cello, Op 149
composer

Con moto  [8'54]
Sarabande  [11'32]
Finale  [7'00]

Other recordings available for download
Christopher Herrick (organ), Paul Barritt (violin), Richard Lester (cello)
Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
The development of the symphony during the latter part of the eighteenth century meant the demise of the baroque suite, but the form began to reassert itself in the middle of the nineteenth century as a way of drawing together sets of character pieces. Rheinberger’s teacher, Franz Lachner, wrote eight suites for orchestra and several of his own organ sonatas are in fact closer in spirit to this form than to the late nineteenth-century concept of the sonata.

The Op 149 Suite begins with an extended movement in sonata form, launched in vigorous mood by the violin’s octave leap which is immediately imitated by the cello. The material of the exposition consists of several short motifs, each with a distinctive profile, presented in dialogue by the violin and cello, the organ taking a more modest, though not merely accompanimental, role. The music moves effortlessly from one idea to the next and the section ends with a three-note cadential figure played by the strings in unison. The music, having remained firmly rooted in the home keys of C minor and E flat major during the exposition, now plunges into the remote region of G flat major and develops one of the more lyrical ideas. The working out of the ideas in the development section is remarkably lucid and thoroughgoing, but without any hint of the dryness of which Rheinberger is sometimes accused; the music has a tremendous sweep and vigour. A move towards G minor, during which the violin and the right hand of the organ play a duet in thirds and sixths, marks the beginning of the long preparation for the return to the opening ideas. Again this is no mere mechanical reprise, but themes are presented in new juxtapositions and now in C major. After an impassioned climax and a gentle reminder of the initial motif the music winds down to a quiet close.

The second movement, a theme and seven variations, again shows Rheinberger’s mastery of form. The soulful, yearning theme is first presented by the organ and then repeated by the strings a major third lower, a beautiful Schubertian touch. The organ then plays a four-bar coda, which appears virtually unchanged in each of the opening four variations. The first variation follows the outline of the theme fairly closely, but already in the second Rheinberger is beginning to use it as a pool of ideas for development. As the variations progress they become much more wide-ranging harmonically – a collection of short character pieces. The fifth and sixth variations, which run into one another, can be seen as a miniature development section with the violin spinning a long impassioned melody over a pizzicato cello part. After a powerful climax the music relaxes through E flat major but immediately builds the tension again for the return to the home key of G major and the seventh variation, the longest. Brief cadenza-like figures herald the quiet end of this remarkable movement.

The Sarabande is in an uncomplicated A–B–A form, in C minor, with a contrasting trio section in A flat. The organ comes into its own in the Finale where the writing is extrovert and virtuosic with much rapid passagework. The movement makes a triumphant ending to a genuinely original work: a real piece of chamber music for a rarely explored combination of instruments.

from notes by Stephen Westrop © 1996


Other albums featuring this work
'Rheinberger: Suites for organ, violin and cello' (CDH55211)
Rheinberger: Suites for organ, violin and cello
MP3 £4.99FLAC £4.99ALAC £4.99Buy by post £5.50 CDH55211  Helios (Hyperion's budget label)  

Show: MP3 FLAC ALAC
   English   Français   Deutsch