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Track(s) taken from CDJ33002

Fischerlied, D562

First line:
Das Fischergewerbe
composer
Third version. May 1817; published in 1895
author of text

Stephen Varcoe (baritone), Graham Johnson (piano)
Recording details: October 1987
Seldon Hall, Haberdashers' Aske's School, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Antony Howell
Release date: December 1988
Total duration: 3 minutes 34 seconds
 
1
Fischerlied D562  Das Fischergewerbe  [3'34]

Reviews

'A delightful collection of songs inspired by water' (The Guardian)

'Listen and marvel' (Fanfare, USA)

'How can a lover of Schubert songs do without this release?' (Stereophile)
The perennial difficulty about all but the greatest strophic songs is that the music is more appropriate to some verses than to others. When Schubert returns to certain elusive texts it suggests an artistic conscience haunted by this very problem. The first Fischerlied of 1816 is very different from that of a year later. Schubert now eschews merry tra-la-las in favour of a setting in the key of F major, a tonality he often associates with pastoral music and with sleep. If the mood of the first Fischerlied takes its cue from the very first line of the poem, this setting grows from the last lines of the second and eighth verses. The tra-la-las of D351 are a particularly inappropriate sequel for descriptions of slumber and the watery grave. In the first setting we hear splashing and wading, but here deeper currents are at work. The alto line of the accompaniment sways gently like the movement of fish in the depths. If the first setting depicts with humour and sympathy a merry worker, the second reveals what lies beneath the surface in him and for him. In fact a decision as to which setting is best is impossible: the poem needs both in order to encompass its range. We perform the first verse in both versions but choose verses 2, 3 and 8 as more appropriate to the music of D562.

from notes by Graham Johnson 1988

Other albums featuring this work

Schubert: The Complete Songs
CDS44201/4040CDs Boxed set + book (at a special price)
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