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Track(s) taken from CDJ33006

Jagdlied, D521

First line:
Trarah, trarah! Wir kehren daheim
composer
January 1817; first published (with different words) as part of Die Nacht, D534, in 1830; in this version 1895
author of text

Anthony Rolfe Johnson (tenor), Graham Johnson (piano)
Recording details: September 1989
Rosslyn Hill Unitarian Chapel, Hampstead, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Martin Compton
Engineered by Antony Howell
Release date: December 1990
Total duration: 1 minutes 34 seconds
 
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Reviews

'As exemplary as … other discs in this series, which is proving a many-splendored thing … this new offering seems packed with even more attractive things than its predecessors' (Gramophone)

'Rolfe Johnson's voice has never sounded more beautiful on disc' (The Penguin Guide to Compact Discs)

'An irresisible disc' (Classic CD)

'Volume 6 of the Hyperion Schubert Edition is assured of a grateful reception from all lovers of this inexhaustible treasury of song' (Hi-Fi News)
If it were not for Diabelli's decision to append this song to Die Nacht it would lack any notoriety, for it is fairly typical of the merry music that Schubert would often write for men's chorus. The words are taken from the first act of Werner's Wanda, Königin der Sarmaten (1810) where a chorus of knights and horsemen break into song. There are some pleasing changes of key, unusual for carousing music of this kind.

Although Zacharias Werner was the poet of only three Schubert songs, he was a central figure in the Romantic movement, especially as a dramatist. He was famous as the writer of historical dramas like Martin Luther and Die Söhne des Thales and 24 Februar, the influential Schicksaltragödie, the popularity of which was an equivalent for the vogue for grisly Friday the Thirteenth movies in our own time. Werner was much travelled, converted to Catholicism on a visit to Rome, and was later ordained. He naturally then rescinded the eulogy of Luther contained in his earlier play. He would have been known to Schubert by his reputation as a fashionable preacher at St Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna.

from notes by Graham Johnson 1990

Other albums featuring this work

Schubert: The Complete Songs
CDS44201/4040CDs Boxed set + book (at a special price)