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Hyperion Records

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The Kermesse (c1638/8) by Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640)
Louvre, Paris / Bridgeman Art Library, London
Track(s) taken from CKD430
Recording details: May 2012
Perth Concert Hall, Scotland
Produced by Philip Hobbs
Engineered by Philip Hobbs & Robert Cammidge
Release date: September 2013
Total duration: 19 minutes 7 seconds

'Notwithstanding the distinguished Brandenburg discography, this set is nothing short of sensational' (Gramophone) » More

'These period instruments performances are refreshingly free from dogma and naturally embrace criteria believed to serve Bach's music best. Melodic ideas are beautifully punctuated and phrased, vibrato is used strictly ornamentally, and tempos strike my sensibilities as pretty well ideal. Perhaps what I like most of all, though, is an all-pervading atmosphere of intimate and convivial dialogue in which all the strands and multifarious colours emerge effortlessly from the full texture' (BBC Music Magazine) » More

'Certainly, the sixth is one of the revelations in this set … transformed into a profoundly expressive study in texture and articulation, with the string lines effortlessly and naturally interlaced … this set is exceptional' (The Guardian) » More

'Even at the first hearing, it is remarkable to find that this over-familiar music often sounds so different as to immediately captivate and engross the listener in a myriad different and unexpected ways, all of them refreshing and illuminating … no matter how many times you've heard the Brandenburg Concertos before, these readings have that rare capacity to make you feel you're hearing them afresh for the very first time' (International Record Review) » More

Brandenburg Concerto No 5 in D major, BWV1050
composer

Allegro  [9'00]
Affettuoso  [5'06]
Allegro  [5'01]

Other recordings available for download
The Brandenburg Consort, Roy Goodman (conductor)
Angela Hewitt (piano), Richard Tognetti (violin), Alison Mitchell (flute), Australian Chamber Orchestra, Richard Tognetti (conductor)
Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
The most important thing to note about the Brandenburg Concerto No 5 in D major, BWV1050 is that this was the first time ever that the harpsichord had been used in a concerto for anything other than the continuo. Always in the background, providing the necessary colour and rhythmic stability (and often conducting as well), the continuo player never really had a chance to shine; but here he takes his revenge! At the beginning of the opening Allegro it almost seems as though the other soloists (flute and violin) have the more important musical dialogue, but gradually the keyboard asserts itself, finally brushing all others aside and launching into an extraordinary sixty-five-bar cadenza. If I say that it is all entirely written out by Bach, it is only because I am frequently asked after concert performances if I wrote it myself! It begins quite lyrically, but then comes a tremendous build-up over a long pedal point in the bass. Some really wild figurations and large jumps in the left hand take us to a climax in B minor. A brief five-bar bridge masterfully returns us to the tonic and the orchestral ritornello. It is thought that Bach might have been inspired to write such a piece to show off the new two-manual harpsichord he had just received from Berlin. It was certainly written with a powerful instrument in mind.

The second movement in B minor, marked Affettuoso, is a touching trio sonata for the three soloists. Unlike the middle movement of the Triple Concerto, however, there is need for a continuo group to accompany the flute and violin when the keyboard is not playing as a soloist. Normally, of course, the one harpsichordist would do both, but here we have used both instruments to clearly separate those passages. The mood is gentle and tender, but with the sense of sorrow that often seems to come with the key of B minor.

The final Allegro is a spirited gigue with an upbeat that gives it a wonderful ‘lift’. Throughout this concerto there is no second violin part – only a small ‘ripieno’ group. Bach himself usually played the viola, but obviously in this piece was seated at the harpsichord, so his place was no doubt filled by the second violinist.

from notes by Angela Hewitt © 2005


Other albums featuring this work
'Bach: The Brandenburg Concertos' (CDD22001)
Bach: The Brandenburg Concertos
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £10.50 CDD22001  2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)  
'Bach: Keyboard Concertos' (CDA30003)
Bach: Keyboard Concertos
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £8.50 CDA30003  Hyperion 30th Anniversary series  
'Bach: Keyboard Concertos' (CDA67607/8)
Bach: Keyboard Concertos
'Bach: The Keyboard Concertos, Vol. 1' (CDA67307)
Bach: The Keyboard Concertos, Vol. 1
'Bach: The Keyboard Concertos, Vol. 1' (SACDA67307)
Bach: The Keyboard Concertos, Vol. 1
This album is not yet available for download SACDA67307  Super-Audio CD — Deleted  

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