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Hyperion Records

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Townscape, Badacsony Hillside by Emil Parrag (b1925)
Private Collection / Bridgeman Art Library, London
Track(s) taken from CDA67871
Recording details: February 2011
Potton Hall, Dunwich, Suffolk, United Kingdom
Produced by Jeremy Hayes
Engineered by Ben Connellan
Release date: January 2012
Total duration: 10 minutes 18 seconds

'The auspices are good even before you press the play button … a master pianist who has thoroughly immersed himself in the composer for years … a particularly happy start to the series' (Gramophone)

'Martin Roscoe performs these memorable virtuoso showpieces with tremendous panache and musical sensitivity … Roscoe's control of timbre is utterly magical … a charismatic and witty performance' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Works some of which are the most winning of the late Romantic era … Roscoe finds the ideal blend of lightness and broad lyrical sweep … a programme that refreshes some gorgeous, unjustly neglected music' (The Daily Telegraph)

'Roscoe's immaculate pianism, probing musical imagination and, above all, sympathy with Dohnányi's expressive ways and means make him the ideal interpreter for such a comprehensive retrospective' (International Record Review)

Three Singular Pieces, Op 44
composer
1951; Tallahasse, Florida; dedicated to John and Martha Kirn

Other recordings available for download
Ernő Dohnányi (piano)
Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Dohnányi composed his Three Singular Pieces Op 44, his last composition for solo piano, in Tallahassee, Florida, in 1951. The humorous work is dedicated to John and Martha Kirn, who had been Dohnányi’s most loyal advocates throughout his odyssey from Europe to the United States. As with the Four Rhapsodies, the Three Singular Pieces can be played individually or together to comprise a traditional multi-movement plan: in this case, the fast-slow-fast configuration of a classical sonata. The first piece is a Burletta, a genre traditionally associated with humour. Just as Bartók used rhythmic interplay to infuse wittiness into the Burletta movement of his String Quartet No 6, Dohnányi’s joke continually repeats an intentionally clumsy sequence of bars that are five, four, three and two beats in duration. The second movement, Nocturne (Cats on the Roof), is a parody of a Romantic nocturne, with the contemplative serenity of the night interrupted in the middle and end of the piece by cascading patterns that represent the meowing of cats. The final piece is a Perpetuum mobile that could indeed last for ever: near the end, the score includes the whimsical instructions ‘Da capo con ripetizioni ad infinitum’.

from notes by James A Grymes © 2012


Other albums featuring this work
'Dohnányi: Dohnányi plays Dohnányi' (APR7038)
Dohnányi: Dohnányi plays Dohnányi

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