Please wait...

Hyperion Records

Click cover art to view larger version
Portrait of Mary I by Hans Eworth (c1520-1574)
AKG London
Track(s) taken from CDA67874
Recording details: November 2010
Fitzalan Chapel, Arundel Castle, United Kingdom
Produced by Jonathan Freeman-Attwood
Engineered by Martin Haskell
Release date: October 2011
Total duration: 5 minutes 12 seconds

'The Cardinall's Musick are at their best in this repertoire, and their performances have confidence and authority … Parsons certainly deserves the hearing that Carwood's musicians afford us, so this addition to the catalogue is very valuable' (Gramophone)

'Carwood and his singers highlight the inherent drama of Parsons' style, notably in O bone Jesu, with its changing textures, brilliant canons and expressive dissonances … perhaps the crowning glory of the disc is the final Ave Maria, the slow and poignant unfolding of which echoes long in the memory. Hyperion's detailed recording, swathed in the glowing acoustic of the Fitzalan Chapel, Arundel Castle, enhances these seraphic performances' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Parsons is not a one-hit-wonder after all … one may expect the incidence of Parsons' music on programmes to increase significantly especially after such a fine sound as Carwood generates' (Classic FM Magazine)

Domine, quis habitabit?
composer
6vv SSAABarB; tenor part reconstructed by Michael Swithinbank
author of text
Psalm 14 (15): 1-3

Other recordings available for download
Magnificat, Philip Cave (conductor)
Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Queen Mary did not want a wholesale return to some perceived halcyon age but was intelligent enough to realize that she had to provide a settlement which did not ignore the recent past. As composers grappled with this new reality they had to find suitable texts for any extended compositions as there seemed to be no demand for a return to the old-fashioned and lengthy Votive Antiphons to the Virgin Mary. They turned instead to the Book of Psalms and to two Psalms in particular—Psalm 15 (or 14 in the Vulgate) Domine, quis habitabit? and various portions of the extended Psalm 119 (Vulgate 118). Both texts are concerned with righteous living and the following of God’s commandments and instruct people how to live a godly life. Could it be that these texts became popular for people searching for the ‘right’ way? The to-and-fro of politics had created a considerable degree of confusion and unease and such advice could be invaluable. Or was it that such texts could apply equally to Protestants as well as Catholics and were unlikely to cause offence?

Domine, quis habitabit? was set by Tallis, William Mundy, Robert White (three times) and William Byrd as well as Parsons himself. Parsons sets only the first half of the Psalm (as does Byrd) and makes a feature of juxtaposing the high voices against the lower ones. The piece seems to owe more to the Continental Flemish style than his more florid English inheritance.

from notes by Andrew Carwood © 2011


Other albums featuring this work
'Byrd, Parsons & White: Where late the sweet birds sang' (CKD417)
Byrd, Parsons & White: Where late the sweet birds sang
MP3 £8.00FLAC £10.00ALAC £10.00 Studio Master: FLAC 24-bit 96 kHz £18.00ALAC 24-bit 96 kHz £18.00 CKD417  Download only   Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available

Show: MP3 FLAC ALAC
   English   Français   Deutsch