Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Click cover art to view larger version
Track(s) taken from CDH55086

The secret sins

composer
author of text

Christopher Royall (countertenor), Paul Nicholson (organ), The Sixteen, Harry Christophers (conductor)
Recording details: August 1988
All Hallows, Gospel Oak, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Mark Brown
Engineered by Antony Howell
Release date: July 1989
Total duration: 3 minutes 42 seconds
 
1
The secret sins  [3'42]

Reviews

'For a wallow in the richest cream of English Reformation church music you couldn't do much better than this' (Early Music Review)

'Intense brilliance and utter serenity … altogether glorious' (The Times)

'Moving presentation of some neglected wonders of the Tudor era' (Fanfare, USA)
The text only of The secret sins occurs in a source attributable to Mundy. The music was long thought to be by Gibbons, but the family resemblance to Ah, helpless wretch is inescapable, not least when the sobriety of the music gives way to a more elaborate ‘Amen’, a feature of Mundy’s talent one may find especially endearing. Often somewhat out of scale with the structure of the preceding music, these ‘amens’ testify to a natural musician rejoicing in the opportunity for free composition, a long-drawn-out lavish cadence appropriate to the finely detailed, confident yet introverted, even melancholy character of his habitual style. His technique, growing in assurance from the 1550s to the 1580s, makes full use of the most characterful devices of the time, especially the emotive, discordant ‘false relation’, but gives a clear impression of an individual voice—direct and graceful.

Sad we cannot now flesh out in greater detail the personality behind this fine music. It would be good to know more about a musician considered in his time second only to the great Byrd, as we discover from Robert Dow’s conceit:

Dies lunae
Ut lucem solis sequitur lux proximae lunae
Sic tu post Birdum Munde secunde venis.
Moon day:
As the light of the moon follows close on the sun
So you after Byrd, Mundy, next do come.

from notes by Nicolas Robertson 1989

Other albums featuring this work

The Sixteen & The Golden Age of Polyphony
CDS44401/1010CDs Boxed set (at a special price)
Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.