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Hyperion Records

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Virgin and child holding a half-eaten pear (detail) (1512) by Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528)
Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna / Bridgeman Art Library, London
Track(s) taken from CDA67669
Recording details: February 2008
Fitzalan Chapel, Arundel Castle, United Kingdom
Produced by Jonathan Freeman-Attwood
Engineered by Martin Haskell & Iestyn Rees
Release date: October 2008
Total duration: 1 minutes 45 seconds

'A superior festive selection box indeed' (Gramophone)

'The often highly expressive, sometimes quirky, and always well-crafted Magnificats and motets of Hieronymus Prateorius are a fine example of the strength-in-depth of German musical creativity. Andrew Carwood and The Cardinall's Musick ardently relish the interplay of voices in the eight-art scorings … the overall impression is compelling, fresh and immediate' (Choir & Organ)

'Their beautiful singing of such fine music deserves wide circulation' (Early Music Review)

'This superb disc … these are stunning performances, which is of course to be expected from this remarkable vocal ensemble … all are bathed in a richly texutred and highly variegated choral sound … Hieronymus Praetorius is considered by many to be one of the greatest North German composers of the first half of the seventeenth century. This release will surely go some way to convincing the rest of us of the truth of this assertion' (International Record Review)

'Hieronymus Praetorius gains his place in the sun with this outstanding release. The 16th-century organist and composer emerges as a master of vivid choral contrasts and effects' (Classic FM Magazine)

Benedictio mensae
First line:
Oculi omnium in te sperant, Domine
composer
1618; re-published in the 1622 Cantiones Sacrae; SATB SATB
author of text
Psalm 144 (145): 15-16; Gradual for the Feast of Corpus Christi

Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Benedictio mensae is a predominantly homophonic motet whose two choirs deliver the text (separately and in combination) with a clarity derived from a respect for natural word stress that was the ideal of the new Baroque practice.

from notes by Jeremy Summerly © 2008

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