Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Click cover art to view larger version
Track(s) taken from CDA67679

Fare Well

First line:
When I lie where shades of darkness
composer
1973; dedicated to Patrick G Variano, Edwin E Snyder, S Talbot Thayer, and all their singers, in honor of Jacob Gunther (1885-1971)
author of text
Fare Well

Schola Cantorum of Oxford, James Burton (conductor)
Recording details: March 2008
Exeter College Chapel, Oxford, United Kingdom
Produced by Adrian Peacock
Engineered by Andrew Mellor
Release date: October 2008
Total duration: 8 minutes 23 seconds

Cover artwork: The Peaceable Kingdom (c1833) by Edward Hicks (1780-1849)
Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts / Bridgeman Art Library, London
 

Other recordings available for download

Polyphony, Stephen Layton (conductor) July 2015 Release

Reviews

'A vivid response to words is paramount in the 1936 sacred motet sequence The Peacable Kingdom … the performances do full justice to this little-known repertoire' (Choir & Organ)
Thompson’s setting of Walter De La Mare’s poem Fare Well was written in the twilight of his life as he entered his seventh decade. The work clearly demonstrates that Thompson continued to hold steadfastly to those tenets of choral writing that marked his compositional style for over fifty years. Composed a half-century later than The Last Invocation, Fare Well shows little stylistic change but a surer hand in creating more elegant vocal lines and a wider and more colourful harmonic vocabulary. The dark, minor-chord opening sets the tone for Thompson’s musical rumination on the theme of death, and melodic and harmonic sequences, trademark Thompson devices so expertly displayed in earlier works, are abundant in this sensitive setting of De La Mare’s poem.

from notes by Morten Lauridsen 2008

Other albums featuring this work

Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...