Please wait...

Hyperion Records

Click cover art to view larger version
Pietrasanta C07.26 (2007 Mixed media on canvas) by Caio Fonseca (b1959)
Reproduced by kind permission of the artist / www.caiofonseca.com
Track(s) taken from CDA67633
Recording details: January 2008
Jesus-Christus-Kirche, Berlin, Germany
Produced by Ludger Böckenhoff
Engineered by Ludger Böckenhoff
Release date: November 2008
Total duration: 26 minutes 58 seconds

'Daniel Müller-Schott and Angela Hewitt give Beethoven's first three cello sonatas a nimble and colourful outing … their duo engagement is compelling and their repertoire of gestures … is exceedingly broad … the recorded sound is beautifully balanced' (Gramophone)

'The success of this duo partnership is very evident in this first volume of Daniel Müller-Schott and Angela Hewitt's Beethoven cycle. They respond with imagination and flexibility to Beethoven's mercurial changes of mood, one moment tender and reflective, then bold and dynamic … a first class release' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Müller-Schott's playing is strong and vibrant … Hewitt brings her characteristic digital dexterity and sparkling articulation to bear … the performances certainly make one look forward to their second disc' (International Record Review)

'In Hyperion's first release in a Beethoven cello sonata cycle, Daniel Müller-Schott's cello seems to hug you like a friendly bear … the disc collects the two Op 5 sonatas and the magnificent Op 69; cherish it most for the players' teasing exchanges, for Hewitt's nimble fingers and Müller-Schott's golden warmth' (The Times)

'The dynamic duo find overwhelming intensity in this music, in a performance packed with detail and emotional gravitas' (Classic FM Magazine)

'Here we are then, at the launch of a wonderful musical adventure, with the outstanding and exquisitely soulful young cellist Danel Müller-Schott, partnered by the wondrous Angela Hewitt at her most sparkling, pristine, warm and flawlessly penetrating in very superior accounts of the two Opus 5 sonatas and the Opus 69 in A major … a major collaboration' (The Herald)

'Müller-Schott has a superbly eloquent and deliciously burnished tone, as nicely done as any I have ever heard … Angela Hewitt proves the perfect partner in this music with a sensitive and leading-when-necessary role that makes for a grand coupling. These might be the premiere Beethoven Cello Sonatas recordings when they are completed—this one is that good' (Audiophile Audition, USA)

'The whole recital is characterised by exquisite phrasing, clean lines and, best of all, an expressiveness that borders on the sublime' (bbc.co.uk)

Cello Sonata in A major, Op 69
composer
sketched in 1807; completed in spring 1808; published by Breitkopf & Härtel in April 1809; dedicated to Count Ignaz von Gleichenstein; first performed in March 1809 by Nikolaus Kraft and Baroness Dorothea von Ertmann

Allegro vivace  [6'55]

Other recordings available for download
Melvyn Tan (fortepiano), Anthony Pleeth (cello)
Steven Isserlis (cello), Robert Levin (fortepiano)
Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
The single Sonata of Op 69 was sketched in 1807, some ten years after the Op 5 pair and concurrently with the Fifth Symphony (Op 67). It was completed in the spring of 1808 in Heiligenstadt and contracted to the publishers Breitkopf & Härtel in September, who issued it the following April in an edition full of printer’s errors. The dedication of the Sonata was to Count Ignaz von Gleichenstein, a Secretary at the War Department and a trusted friend of the composer. It had been performed for the first time a month earlier, in March 1809, by the cellist Nikolaus Kraft (the son of Anton Kraft and a member of Schuppanzigh’s famous string quartet) and Baroness Dorothea von Ertmann, one of the greatest of the first generation of Beethoven pianists.

The lyrical A major world of this third Sonata conveys as well as any other work of the period the self-confident mood that Beethoven was in during the latter half of the first decade of the nineteenth century, before his life was disrupted by the French invasion of Vienna in the middle of 1809. The first movement opens rather like the slightly earlier Fourth Piano Concerto (1806) with, in this case, the cello entering softly and unaccompanied with a theme that gradually builds to a short piano flourish, repeated with the roles reversed. A vigorous bridge passage leads to the second subject, a combination of rising scales and downward arpeggios, again repeated with the instrumental roles inverted. The triplets of the bridge return with the codetta to the exposition which is dominated by an attractive idea new to the movement. The development concentrates on the music of the first subject which in a foreshortened form eventually opens the recapitulation, before reappearing at the end of the movement. There follows the only Scherzo of these Sonatas and it is typical of the form as Beethoven developed it during his ‘middle period’ works, with its length approaching that of the outer movements, achieved by repeating the almost waltz-like ‘trio’ between three statements of the syncopated main scherzo theme. The slow introduction to the finale is shorter than those to the first movements of the two earlier sonatas, with more of a cantabile continuity to it. The Allegro vivace recalls the opening of the first ‘Rasumovsky’ String Quartet in both the configuration of its opening theme and in its sunny mood which continues into the restrained second subject where cello and piano alternate short phrases.

from notes by Matthew Rye © 1996


Other albums featuring this work
'Beethoven: Cello Sonatas' (CDA67981/2)
Beethoven: Cello Sonatas
MP3 £15.49FLAC £15.49ALAC £15.49Buy by post £20.00 Studio Master: FLAC 24-bit 96 kHz £23.25ALAC 24-bit 96 kHz £23.25 CDA67981/2  2CDs   Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'Beethoven: Complete Cello Music' (CDD22004)
Beethoven: Complete Cello Music
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £27.98 (ARCHIVE SERVICE) CDD22004  2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1) — Archive Service  

Show: MP3 FLAC ALAC
   English   Français   Deutsch