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Hyperion Records

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Fresco on the staircase of Kimbolton Castle, Huntingdon by Giovanni Antonio Pellegrini (1675-1741)
Reproduced by kind permission of the Governors of Kimbolton School
Track(s) taken from CDH55258
Recording details: May 1995
St Jude-on-the-Hill, Hampstead Garden Suburb, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Martin Compton
Engineered by Tony Faulkner
Release date: February 1996
Total duration: 11 minutes 41 seconds

'Universally full of spirit and charm … both trumpeters are on fine form, sounding effortlessly relaxed and beautifully matched, with an enticing sweetness of tone. Recommended' (Gramophone)

'A thoughtfully planned disc with plenty of variety … expertly directed and stylishly played, this well-filled disc is highly recommended' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Had the English Orpheus been a trumpeter, this is how he might have played' (Early Music Review)

'Holman, of course, is now a past master with this kind of repertoire and the performances of all this music are outstanding, unaffected rhythmically, intensely alive and with alert and responsive playing that is as bright and refreshing as the music itself. Excellent recording. Strongly recommended' (Fanfare, USA)

'C'est un disque joyeux' (Répertoire, France)

'Laird et Bennett sont familiers de ce répertoire et nous enchantent par leur facilité, leur sens des effets, leur opulence sonore' (Diapason, France)

Suite 'made for the Queen's Coronation'
composer
1702; Harmonia Anglicana, iv

Air  [1'06]
Jig  [1'22]
Roundo  [1'38]
Roundo  [0'47]
Air  [0'59]

Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Walsh published Barrett’s sonata without its wind parts, and seems to have meted out the same treatment to John Eccles’s charming suite written for Queen Anne’s coronation in 1702. It clearly needs a trumpet in some of the movements. The work was presumably played by court musicians during the banquet in Westminster Hall that traditionally followed the coronation service. An engraving of the 1685 coronation banquet shows the musicians crammed into a small gallery with no keyboard instrument. There are no figures in the printed bass part of Eccles’s suite, and no sign that he intended a continuo, so we have recorded the work just with strings. It has several delightful movements in a variety of rustic styles. No 2 is certainly in the Scots style and No 5 seems to be an English jig; if No 7 is intended to be an Irish jig, it may be that Eccles intended the suite to represent the different musical idioms of Queen Anne’s kingdoms.

from notes by Peter Holman © 1995

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