Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

English Hymn Anthems

King's College Choir Cambridge, Stephen Cleobury (conductor) Detailed performer information
Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
CD-Quality:
Studio Master:
CD-Quality:
Studio Master:
 
 
Download only
Recording details: July 2013
King's College Chapel, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Produced by Simon Kiln
Engineered by Jonathan Allen & Richard Hale
Release date: March 2015
Total duration: 72 minutes 48 seconds

Cover artwork: Photograph of organ casing, Chapel of King's College, Cambridge by Mike Dixon
 

This album contains anthems based on hymn tunes from the Anglican choral tradition. It continues the Choir’s active commitment to expanding the popular understanding of choral repertoire through original research and recording.

Reviews

'The airy acoustic of the chapel coupled with the fine Harrison & Harrison (mostly) organ help to define a peculiarly and uniquely English sound, especially suited to the repertoire on this fine disc … this is King's playing to its considerable strengths at all levels' (Gramophone)

'The King's performance [of the Parry] is predictably idiomatic, if a touch carefully preened and respectful … [Ireland's] is a more explicitly dramatic setting, and the singers seem to relish this … Parker Ramsay's organ accompaniment is a model of intelligent supportiveness' (BBC Music Magazine)
The traditional English anthem was based on a prose text taken from the bible, most often from the Psalms, or occasionally from the Book of Common Prayer. In the 19th century, metrical texts, and tunes to go with them, gradually became more common. There are a few earlier examples, including some of Handel’s anthems. In the early 1800s many cathedral choirs were no longer capable of singing difficult music, so they substituted strophic hymns. John Clarke (later Clarke-Whitfeld) complained in 1805 of ‘the absurd, if not profane, introduction of [William] Jackson’s Hymns, in siciliana movements!… The Sicilian Mariners Hymn!…The Portuguese Hymn [Adeste, fideles]! &c. &c. as substitutes for anthems!’ One of the finest examples of this movement is Thomas Attwood’s melodious ‘Come, Holy Ghost’, a setting of the only hymn that was part of the authorised prayer-book liturgy (in the ordination service). Composed for the choir of St. Paul’s cathedral, it was first sung there on Whitsunday 1831.

By that time non-scriptural hymns, once disdained as dissenters’ music, were fast gaining acceptance in the Church of England. Even the Oxford Movement supported them when they were based on mediaeval or other Latin originals. As Peter Horton has shown, some Victorians began using hymns as anthem texts. Samuel Sebastian Wesley chose a hymn by his grandfather Charles, ‘Thou judge of quick and dead’, to conclude his great anthem ‘Let us lift up our heart’, and others followed suit. It took one more step to introduce an existing hymn tune as well as a hymn text. One of the earliest anthems to do so had a Cambridge origin. William Sterndale Bennett’s ‘Lord, who shall dwell in thy tabernacle’ was commissioned for Commencement Sunday, 1856, to mark his appointment as professor of music, and performed at the University Church of St. Mary. Appropriately, one section made use of the well-known 17th-century tune St. Mary’s, with a newly-written text. It was no coincidence that Bennett had been studying the music of J. S. Bach.

The hymn-anthem began to be recognised as a distinct form in the 1880s. It gained enormously in popularity with the late Victorians, and on into the 20th century. Cathedral services, once sparsely attended or even closed to outsiders, were now being opened up to the general public, who naturally liked the sound of a familiar tune. On the other side, the cathedral-type anthem was being more and more widely adopted by parish choirs. Some hymn-anthems were originally designed for a large choir and orchestra at choral festivals. The recent discovery of Bach’s chorale cantatas offered an enticing model, and many composers explored different ways of including hymns in their anthems.

The Great War led to new thinking on many fronts, including criticism of anything that suggested elitism. Some church authorities asserted that anthems should be discontinued altogether, on the ground that people attended church to join in the service and not to listen to the choir. This led to a compromise: an anthem for the choir, incorporating a hymn in which the congregation could take part. It was discussed as such in ‘The Hymn-Anthem: A New Choral Form’ by Charles F. Waters (Musical Times, July 1930).

In this recording the King’s College Choir offers a varied selection of hymn-anthems from the period of their greatest popularity, the 1890s to the 1930s. Most of them owe their materials to Hymns Ancient and Modern (HA&M), the dominant hymnal of the time. The variety of approaches to the form is reflected in their differing generic titles—anthem, motet, hymn, song. Some of the hymn texts are biblical paraphrases; some are poems not originally conceived as hymns. A hymn-anthem may incorporate existing hymn tunes, dating from the 6th to the 19th century, or launch a new tune, which may later be adopted for congregational use, as Parry’s was. Some use scriptural prose as well as a hymn. The musical treatment also varies widely: there may be a recognisably strophic form, like a theme and variations; or the tune may be a source of motives for development or fugal treatment.

The two organ preludes are also based on familiar hymn tunes. The magnificent organ at King’s is well suited to the music of the period, used to great advantage by Stephen Cleobury. The choir offers a vast range of mood and expression, from tender to awe-inspiring, while the famous acoustics of the chapel add an aura of splendour throughout.

Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry Hear my words, ye people
Parry was not primarily a composer of church music, but his occasional ventures in that direction often transcended the efforts of his contemporaries. This anthem, commissioned for a festival of the Salisbury Diocesan Choral Association, was designed for a massed gathering of parish choirs with orchestra. It is on a grand scale with an elaborate, almost symphonic organ part. After extended development of prose passages from Job, Isaiah, and the Psalms, including sections in related keys for bass solo, treble solo, and semichorus, the climax after the return to the home key of B flat is a setting of three verses of ‘O praise ye the Lord’, a paraphrase of Psalm 150 written by Henry Baker (1821–77) for the 1875 edition of HA&M. Parry’s vigorous, uplifting tune is in ABA form, with a modulating B section for unaccompanied semichorus. The A section, here sung in unison, would soon become the standard tune for Baker’s hymn, under the name Laudeate Dominum. The anthem ends with an extended Amen; on the last chord a powerful 32-foot stop can be heard.

Sir Charles Villiers Stanford O for a closer walk with God
Unlike Parry, Stanford made it his business to provide up-to-date music for the Anglican choral service. But this piece had a different origin. In 1909 he published Six Bible Songs for solo voice and organ (Op 113). Their specific purpose is unknown: to Jeremy Dibble ‘they come across as a cycle of solo cantatas’. Stanford was apparently dissatisfied with the result. The next year he added Six Hymns for choir and organ, using existing tunes; each was intended to follow one of the songs. This one was attached to No 6, ‘A Song of Wisdom’ (based on Ecclesiasticus xxiv). Its text is verses 1, 4 and 6 of a poem by William Cowper (1731–1800), written in 1769: the opening words refer to Genesis v. 24. Stanford used the simple tune which had been adopted for this text in HA&M: Caithness, from the Scottish metrical psalter of 1635. The first verse is a plain setting for trebles and organ; the other two are harmonically varied for SATB, with some extensions. The organ supplies an introduction and coda.

Sir Edward Cuthbert Bairstow Blessed city, heavenly Salem
Bairstow was a Yorkshireman. He wrote this anthem for Heaton parish choir soon after his appointment as organist of York Minster. It is one of five hymn-anthems in his output, and was to become perhaps his best-known work. ‘Blessed City’ was even chosen for the title of Francis Jackson’s biography of the composer. Both text and tune come from the 9th-century processional hymn Urbs beata Jerusalem; Bairstow used five of its eight verses, in a heavily revised version of J. M. Neale’s 1851 translation. The plainsong melody is in the Dorian mode, but there is nothing modal about Bairstow’s treatment, which is thoroughly contemporary, with a flamboyant organ part inspired by the text. He used phrases from the melody freely, sometimes extending or modifying them or adding a descant, and modulating to related keys. After a triumphal climax, the anthem ends with a quiet prayer, with the tune in long notes in the tenor accompanying a florid treble solo, followed by a subdued Amen.

Percy William Whitlock Jesu, grant me this, I pray
Whitlock studied organ with Henry Ley (as I did in 1945, Ley’s last year as precentor of Eton) and composition with Stanford and Vaughan Williams. He was organist of Rochester cathedral in 1921–30, and ended his career as borough organist at Bournemouth Pavilion. This beautiful hymn-anthem (so designated) was apparently written for Rochester. The words are from a 17th-century hymn, Dignare me, O Jesu, rogo te, as translated by Henry Baker for HA&M (1861). Unlike most of the hymn-anthems this one is penitential, unaccompanied, and in the minor mode; Malcolm Riley calls it ‘Orlando Gibbons-ish’. The four verses are set in the form ABBA, an otherwise unidentified tune that is presumably Whitlock’s own, followed by a brief Amen.

Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry Eventide
Late in life Parry composed and published fourteen chorale preludes on well-known hymn tunes. Bach’s influence is evident, especially in the long introduction and the interludes between phrases. The tune had been composed by William H. Monk for Henry Lyte’s famous evening hymn ‘Abide with me’ in the first edition of HA&M (1861). Parry goes through the tune only once, at a deliberate pace. His setting is largely diatonic, and is quiet and contemplative until the build-up after line 3 (‘and comforts flee’). The tune is here played on a clarinet stop, but when the last line is repeated a cor-anglais stop comes into play.

Sir Henry Walford Davies O sons and daughters
Another anthem based on a Latin source, this time an Easter hymn, O filii et filiae, by Jean Tisserand (d1494), as translated in 1851 by J. M. Neale, a high-church ecclesiologist. It was one of Walford Davies’s Spiritual Songs: Fourteen Short Anthems and Introits, published in 1918, well before he became famous as a broadcaster on musical topics. He was a deft writer of choral music. In this case he bypassed the HA&M form of the tune and used an older, modal version, with a shortened Alleluia. He also cut three stanzas dealing with the doubts of Thomas. The six remaining verses are set for various solos and choral sections, but the Alleluia refrain is always for the full choir. Despite the direction ‘Joyously’, the music sounds anxious, lacking the jubilation one expects at Easter. The choir is unaccompanied until the last verse. Then the organ makes a dramatic entry and the tune is brilliantly extended, with, at long last, a major final chord.

Sir William Henry Harris O what their joy and their glory must be
The text is Neale’s translation of a dactylic poem by the famous French theologian and composer Pierre Abélard (1079–1142), O quanta qualia sunt illa sabbata. The anonymous tune is from the Paris Antiphoner of 1681, written for a different text; it was joined to these words in HA&M (1861). Harris, who had studied under Parratt and Wood, was organist of Christ Church, Oxford when he composed this anthem; he would later move to St. George’s Chapel, Windsor. He starts with the plain tune sung in unison, and treats all seven verses of the hymn in variation form, with frequent interludes. The later verses increasingly wander away from the tune and its key of G major, and the tonality even traverses the ‘circle of fifths’. Then the music builds to a climactic return for the final unison verse, followed by a reassuringly traditional Amen over a tonic pedal.

Ralph Vaughan Williams Rhosymedre
From Three Preludes founded on Welsh Hymn Tunes, published in 1920 with a dedication to Alan Gray. The tune, also named Lovely, was by John David Edwards (1805–85), vicar of Rhosymedre, Denbighshire, and was set to Charles Wesley’s hymn ‘Author of love divine’ in the English Hymnal, of which Vaughan Williams was one of the editors. On the Bach model he maintains a constant, moderate level in dynamics and emotional intensity. He first develops an independent motive, then brings in the tune in leisurely fashion. Characteristically, he often uses parallel fourths, fifths, and triads where Bach might have had single melodic lines. The tune first enters unobtrusively in the tenor register, then more prominently in an upper voice. The prelude ends with a sober repeat of the introduction.

John Nicholason Ireland Vexilla regis
Ireland is best known for his piano music and songs. He was also a church musician, but apart from the famous motet ‘Greater love hath no man’, this ‘Hymn for Passion Sunday’ is the only work of his that could properly be called an anthem. He wrote it at the age of 19 for Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Street, London, where he had his first post as organist, while studying composition with Stanford. It was scored for soloists, chorus, brass and organ. The ancient hymn Vexilla regis prodeunt by Venantius Fortunatus, dating from 569, had been set by Palestrina, Alessandro Scarlatti, Bruckner, Gounod, Liszt, Vaughan Williams and many others. Ireland used Neale’s translation. But instead of the ancient melody he based most of the anthem on a powerful C minor theme of his own, with a modal flavour, first stated in unison on the organ. The development is brilliant, but Ireland had not yet found a consistent personal style. After the dramatic ending of the C major third verse on a surprising chord of E major (‘from the Tree’), the triple-time treble solo in that key, followed by the same music for a cappella quartet, sounds early-Victorian. So does the return to C major, though it is approached with post-Wagnerian chromatics under the unison G on the word ‘prey’. After a climactic high C, the Amen is a fugato based on the first phrase of the mediaeval melody.

Sir George Dyson Praise
A leading composer and writer on musical subjects, Dyson was not a church musician by profession. He studied composition at the Royal College of Music under Stanford. In 1935 he published Three Songs of Praise for accompanied chorus, carefully choosing poems by early-modern English writers and calling them ‘Praise’, ‘Lauds’, and ‘A Poet’s Hymn’. This poem by George Herbert (1593–1633), published as ‘Antiphon’ in The Temple (1633), had already been adopted as a hymn with a rousing tune by Basil Harwood, who added extra repeats of the refrain. Dyson wrote his own equally sturdy tune, in a rondo form based on the poem’s structure. The refrain occurs three times in G major, each time rising to a higher climax; the verses in between modulate to neighbouring keys.

Charles Wood God omnipotent reigneth
Charles Wood, yet another Stanford pupil, eventually succeeded his teacher as professor of music at Cambridge. But he was more interested in early music than Stanford. This anthem is an outcome of his lifelong collaboration with the Revd George Woodward (1848–1934), scholar and hymnologist. They shared an enthusiasm for traditional hymns and carols. Woodward’s hymn, based on Psalm 93, was published in his Songs of Syon (1904), adapted to the Dorian tune of Psalm 107 from the French metrical psalter of 1562. Wood, an expert on 16th-century counterpoint, may well have played a part in the harmonisation. Later he wrote this elaboration of the hymn. The organ, after an introduction, links the phrases of the tune, then fully accompanies a varied second verse, followed by an Amen in D major. As Ian Copley wrote in his study of Wood’s work, this is ‘a resplendent and fiery work, very exhilarating to perform’.

Ralph Vaughan Williams Lord, thou hast been our refuge
Vaughan Williams published this work as a ‘motet’. Yet of all the examples on this record it is the most thorough blending of a prose anthem with a metrical hymn: at several points they are heard simultaneously. The prose text is almost the whole of Psalm 90 in the prayer-book version (taken, of course, from Coverdale’s Great Bible of 1539). The famous hymn, ‘O God, our help in ages past’, is a paraphrase of the same psalm by Isaac Watts (1674–1748), published in 1719 in his Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament. The equally famous tune by William Croft (1678–1727), composed for a different text in 1708, was named St. Anne after the church in Soho where Croft was organist. Verse and tune were first joined by Theophania Cecil in 1814 for use at the Evangelical proprietary chapel of St. John, Bedford Row, London, where she was organist, and the combination was adopted for HA&M in 1861.

A kind of recitative, sung in unison, begins the prose psalm in D minor, with an SATB version of the hymn in D major heard in the background, pianissimo; the recitation continues for full choir, leading to F sharp minor. After an organ interlude based on St. Anne, the chanting continues with increasing fervour. Then the hymn tune blazes forth on an actual trumpet, played by Alison Balsom, and is taken apart in free choral counterpoint until it reaches its apotheosis in a resplendent D major conclusion.

Nicholas Temperley © 2014

Traditionnellement, l’«anthem» anglais était basé sur un texte en prose extrait de la bible—des Psaumes, le plus souvent, ou occasionnellement du Book of Common Prayer anglican. Au 19ème siècle cependant, les textes versifiés accompagnés d’une mélodie devinrent de plus en plus courants; il en existe quelques exemples plus anciens, notamment dans les anthems de Handel. Au début du 19ème siècle, nombreux étaient les chœurs de cathédrales qui n’étaient plus capables de chanter une musique trop difficile, et lui substituèrent des hymnes strophiques. John Clarke (subséquemment Clarke-Whitfield) se plaignait dès 1805 de l’«absurde, si ce n’est profane, introduction des hymnes de [William] Jackson, en mouvements siciliens!…L’Hymne des Marins siciliens!…l’Hymne portugais [Adeste, fideles]!…&c. &c. substitués aux anthems!» L’un des meilleurs exemples de cette tendance est le mélodieux «Come, Holy Ghost» de Thomas Attwood, une mise en musique du seul hymne inclus dans le canon liturgique autorisé (au cours de l’office de l’ordination). Composé pour le chœur de la Cathédrale Saint-Paul de Londres, il y fut chanté pour la première fois en 1831 pour le dimanche de Pentecôte.

À cette époque, les hymnes non scripturaires, autrefois dédaigneusement considérés comme de la musique de «dissenters», connaissaient une reconnaissance de plus en plus forte au sein de l’Église anglicane—le Mouvement d’Oxford lui-même ne leur était pas hostile, lorsque le texte en était médiéval, ou du moins écrit en latin. Peter Horton a montré comment certains Victoriens commencèrent à utiliser des hymnes comme textes d’anthems. Samuel Sebastien Wesley choisit ainsi un hymne de son aïeul Charles, «Thou judge of quick and dead», comme conclusion de son grand anthem «Let us lift up our heart», et d’autres suivirent son exemple. L’étape suivante fut l’introduction d’un air d’hymne déjà existant, ainsi que d’un texte hymnique. L’un des premiers anthems ainsi conçus trouve son origine à Cambridge: «Lord, who shall dwell in thy tabernacle» fut commandé à William Sterndale Bennett pour le Dimanche du Commencement de 1856, à l’occasion de sa nomination au poste de professeur de musique, et chanté en l’église Sainte-Marie de l’Université. En conséquence, une des sections associa l’air de Sainte-Marie, en vogue depuis le 17ème siècle, à un texte nouvellement composé—Bennett avait étudié la musique de J.S. Bach, ce qui n’est certainement pas une coïncidence.

L’hymn-anthem fut reconnu peu à peu comme une forme distincte dans les années 1880. Il connut une popularité immense auprès les Victoriens tardifs, et dans la première moitié du 20ème siècle. Les services des cathédrales, jusqu’ici peu fréquentés, voire réservés aux fidèles locaux, furent désormais ouverts au public, qui appréciait bien naturellement les mélodies familières. D’autre part, l’anthem des cathédrales fut utilisé de plus en plus fréquemment par les chœurs de paroisses. Certains hymn-anthems furent d’abord écrits pour un large chœur et orchestre à l’occasion de festivals; mais la découverte récente des cantates de Bach offrit un modèle séduisant, et de nombreux compositeurs se mirent à explorer diverses manières d’introduire des hymnes au sein de leurs anthems.

La Grande Guerre amena de nouvelles idées sur plusieurs fronts, notamment la critique de tout ce qui pouvait suggérer l’élitisme. Certaines autorités ecclésiastiques déclarèrent que les anthems devaient cesser d’exister, affirmant que les fidèles venaient à l’église pour prendre part au service et non pour écouter le chœur. Un compromis en résulta: l’introduction d’un anthem pour le chœur qui incorporerait un hymne chanté par toute la congrégation; ce qui fut considéré par Charles F. Waters comme ‘L’Hymn-Anthem: une nouvelle forme chorale’ (Musical Times, juillet 1930).

Dans cet enregistrement, le chœur de King’s College offre une sélection variée d’hymn-anthems issus de leur période la plus populaire, des années 1890 aux années 1930. La plupart proviennent du principal hymnaire de l’époque, Hymns Ancient and Modern (HA&M). La variété des traitements de cette forme est illustrée par la diversité générique des titres—anthem, motet, hymne, chanson…Certains textes sont des paraphrases bibliques, d’autres des poèmes qui n’ont pas été conçus comme des hymnes. Un hymn-anthem peut incorporer des mélodies d’hymnes déjà existants, du 6ème au 19ème siècle, ou employer un nouvel air, utilisé par la suite en congrégation, comme ce fut le cas pour celui de Parry. Certains enfin mêlent prose scripturaire et hymne. Le traitement musical varie lui aussi considérablement: tantôt l’on reconnaît une forme strophique, comme un thème et des variations, tantôt l’air fournit des motifs pour un développement ou une fugue.

Les deux préludes pour orgue sont également basés sur des airs d’hymnes familiers. L’orgue splendide de King’s est, sous les doigts experts de Stephen Cleobury, un instrument idéal pour la musique de cette période. Le chœur offre toute une gamme d’émotions et d’expression, du tendre au terrible, et l’acoustique fameuse de la chapelle enrobe toute la musique d’un halo de splendeur.

Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry Hear my words, ye people
Parry n’était pas à l’origine un compositeur de musique religieuse, mais ses expériences occasionnelles dans ce domaine le placent bien au-dessus de ses contemporains. Cet anthem, commandée pour un festival de l’Association Chorale Diocésaine de Salisbury, fut composé pour un imposant rassemblement de chœurs de paroisse avec orchestre. C’est une œuvre d’envergure qui comprend une partie d’orgue complexe, presque symphonique. Après un long développement de passages en prose extraits de Job, d’Isaïe et des Psaumes, incluant des sections en tonalités voisines pour basse solo, soprano solo, et demi-chœur, l’apogée est atteinte (après un retour à la tonalité de si bémol) sur trois strophes de «O praise ye the Lord», une paraphrase du Psaume 150 écrite par Henry Baker (1821–77) pour l’édition de 1877 de HA&M. L’air puissant et radieux de Parry est dans la forme ABA, la section B étant une modulation pour demi-chœur a capella. La section A, chantée ici à l’unisson, allait bientôt devenir l’air de référence pour l’hymne de Baker, sous le nom de Laudate Dominum. L’anthem se termine sur un long Amen; sur le dernier accord, les jeux de 32 pieds retentissent avec puissance.

Sir Charles Villiers Stanford O for a closer walk with God
Contrairement à Parry, Stanford prit sur lui la tâche de procurer au service choral anglican de la musique nouvelle. L’origine de cette pièce, cependant, est à chercher ailleurs. En 1909, il publia Six Chants Bibliques pour voix et orgue (op.113). Leur intention spécifique est inconnue; pour Jeremy Dibble «elles semblent constituer un cycle de cantates pour soliste». Stanford ne fut apparemment pas satisfait du résultat, et l’année suivante il ajouta Six Hymnes pour chœur et orgue, en utilisant des airs existants, chaque hymne devant faire suite à un des airs. Celui-ci était attaché au numéro 6, «A Song of Wisdom» (d’après l’Ecclésiate, xxiv). Son texte reprend les strophes 1, 4 et 6 d’un poème de William Cowper (1731–1800), écrit en 1769; il commence par une référence à la Genèse, v. 24. Stanford utilisa l’air limpide adopté pour ce texte dans HA&M: Caithness, issu du psautier écossais versifié de 1635. La première strophe est composée simplement pour sopranos et orgue; les deux autres, harmoniquement variés, sont écrits pour toutes les voix, avec quelques extensions. L’orgue se charge également d’une introduction et d’une coda.

Sir Edward Cuthbert Bairstow Blessed city, heavenly Salem
Bairstow était originaire du Yorkshire. Il écrivit cet anthem pour le chœur de la paroisse de Heaton peu après sa nomination comme organiste de la cathédrale d’York. C’est l’un des cinq hymn-anthems de sa production, et allait devenir son œuvre la plus connue—Blessed city est d’ailleurs le titre de la biographie du compositeur par Francis Jackson. Texte et air proviennent de l’hymne processionnel du 9ème siècle Urbs beata Jerusalem; Bairstow utilisa cinq de ses huit strophes, dans une version très adaptée de la traduction de J. M. Neale datée de 1851. La mélodie de plain-chant est en mode dorien, mais il n’y a rien de modal dans le traitement résolument contemporain qu’en fait Bairstow, avec une partie d’orgue haute en couleur inspirée par le texte. Il utilisa librement des parties de la mélodie, en les allongeant et les modifiant parfois, leur ajoutant un déchant et les modulant dans des tonalités voisines. Après une apogée triomphale, l’anthem se termine sur une calme prière, don’t l’air, chanté en valeurs longues par un ténor accompagnant un soprano solo tout en virtuosité, est suivi d’un Amen en demi-teintes.

Percy William Whitlock Jesu, grant me this, I pray
Whitlock étudia l’orgue avec Henry Ley (comme ce fut mon cas en 1945, la dernière année de Ley comme chantre à Eton) et la composition avec Stanford et Vaughan Williams. Il fut organiste à la cathédrale de Rochester de 1921 à 1930, et termina sa carrière comme organiste au Pavillon de Bournemouth. Ce magnifique hymn-anthem (désigné comme tel) fut apparemment écrit pour Rochester. Le texte provient d’un hymne du 17ème siècle, Dignare me, O Jesu, rogo te, traduite par Henry Baker pour HA&M en 1861. Contrairement à la plupart des hymn-anthems, celui-ci est pénitentiel, sans accompagnement et en mode mineur; Malcolm Riley le décrit comme «Orlando Gibbon-esque». Les quatre strophes sont organisées selon le schéma ABBA, sur un air non identifié qui est sans doute une création de Whitlock, et suivies d’un bref Amen.

Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry Eventide
Vers la fin de sa vie Parry composa et publia quatorze préludes choraux sur des airs d’hymnes populaires. L’influence de Bach est évidente, en particulier dans la longue introduction et les interludes entre les phrases. L’air fut composé par William H. Monk pour le célèbre hymne de Henry Lyte «Abide with me», dans la première édition de HA&M (1861). Parry ne fait entendre l’air qu’une seule fois, à une allure majestueuse. La musique en est largement diatonique, et reste calme et contemplative jusqu’à l’augmentation qui suit le troisième vers («and comforts flee»). L’air est alors interprété sur un jeu de clarinette, mais lorsque le dernier vers est répété c’est un jeu de cor anglais qui se fait entendre.

Sir Henry Walford Davies O sons and daughters
Il s’agit à nouveau d’un anthem issu d’une source latine, cette fois un hymne pascal, O fili et filiae, par Jean Tisserand (mort en 1841), traduit en 1851 par J. M. Neale, un ecclésiologue de la Haute Église. C’est l’un des Chants Spirituels: Quatorze Courts Anthems et Introits de Walford Davies, publiés en 1918, bien avant qu’il connaisse la célébrité comme journaliste radiophonique, spécialiste de musique. C’était un habile compositeur de musique chorale; pour cette pièce il a passé outre la forme utilisée par HA&M pour recourir à une version modale plus ancienne, avec un Alléluia plus court. Il supprima également trois strophes consacrées aux doutes de Thomas. Les six strophes restantes alternent les solos et les passages de chœur, mais l’Alléluia du refrain est toujours chanté par le chœur entier. Malgré l’indication «Joyeusement», la musique est anxieuse, la jubilation pascale semble en être absente. Le chœur est a cappella jusqu’à la dernière strophe; l’orgue fait alors une entrée dramatique et l’air est brillamment amplifié jusqu’à l’accord majeur final tant attendu.

Sir William Henry Harris O what their joy and their glory must be
Le texte est la traduction par Neale d’un poème dactilyque du célèbre théologien et compositeur français Pierre Abélard (1079–1142), O quanta qualia sunt illa sabbata. L’air anonyme provient de l’antiphonaire de Paris de 1681, écrit pour un autre texte et associé à celui-ci dans HA&M (1861). Harris, après avoir étudié avec Parrat et Wood, était organiste à Christ Church, Oxford quand il composa cet anthem; il fut ensuite nommé à la chapelle Saint-George de Windsor. L’air est d’abord entendu à l’unisson, puis soumis à des variations au cours des sept strophes de l’hymne, avec de fréquents interludes. Les dernières strophes s’éloignent toujours plus de l’air et de sa tonalité de sol majeur, passant même par le «cercle des quintes». La musique se déploie alors jusqu’à l’apogée de la dernière strophe, chantée à l’unisson, et suivie de la conclusion rassurante d’un Amen traditionnel, sur une pédale tonique.

Ralph Vaughan Williams Rhosymedre
Extrait des Trois Préludes sur des Airs d’Hymnes Gallois, publiés en 1920 et dédiés à Alan Gray. L’air, également appelé Lovely, est dû à John David Edwards (1805–85), vicaire de Rhosymedre, dans le Denbighshire, et fut associé à l’hymne de Charles Wesley «Author of love divine» dans l’English Hymnal don’t Vaughan Williams était l’un des éditeurs. Sur le modèle de Bach, il maintient la dynamique et l’intensité émotionnelle de la pièce dans des limites strictes de permanence et de modération. Il commence par développer un motif indépendant, avant d’introduire l’air avec sérénité. De manière caractéristique, il utilise fréquemment des quartes, quintes et triades parallèles là où Bach aurait utilisé de simples lignes mélodiques. L’air apparaît d’abord discrètement dans le registre ténor, puis avec plus de force dans une voix plus aiguë. Le prélude s’achève sur une reprise sobre de l’introduction.

John Nicholason Ireland Vexilla regis
Bien qu’Ireland soit surtout connu pour sa musique pour piano et ses chansons, c’était également un musicien d’église; mais à part son célèbre motet «Greater love hath no man», cet «Hymne pour le Dimanche de la Passion» est la seule de ses œuvres que l’on puisse réellement appeler un anthem. Il l’écrivit à l’âge de 19 ans pour l’église de la Sainte Trinité de Sloane Street, à Londres, où il occupa son premier poste d’organiste, tout en étudiant la composition avec Stanford. Il est orchestré pour solistes, chœur, cuivres et orgue. L’hymne Vexilla regis prodeunt, écrit par Venantius Fortunatus en 569, avait été mis en musique par Palestrina, Alessandro Scarlatti, Bruckner, Gounod, Liszt, Vaughan Williams et bien d’autres; Ireland utilisa la traduction de Neale. Mais au lieu de l’ancienne mélodie, il basa l’essentiel de l’anthem sur un puissant thème en do mineur de sa composition, au parfum modal, d’abord exprimé par l’orgue à l’unisson. Le développement en est brillant, mais Ireland n’avait pas encore trouvé de style personnel cohérent. Après la résolution dramatique de la troisième strophe en do majeur sur un surprenant accord de mi majeur («from the Tree»), le solo de soprano sur un rythme ternaire dans cette tonalité, suivi du même air pour un quatuor a cappella, appartiennent au style des premiers Victoriens. Il en va de même pour le retour en do majeur, bien qu’il soit introduit par un chromatisme post-wagnérien sous un unisson en sol, sur le mot «prey». Après l’apogée sur le do aigu, l’Amen présente une fugue basée sur la première phrase de la mélodie médiévale.

Sir George Dyson Praise
Compositeur de renom et écrivain sur des sujets musicaux, Dyson n’était pas un musicien d’église par profession. Il étudia la composition au Royal College of Music avec Stanford; en 1935 il publia Three Songs of Praise pour chœur avec accompagnement, choisissant soigneusement des poèmes d’écrivains anglais du début de l’époque moderne et les baptisant «Praise», «Lauds» et «A Poet’s Hymn». Ce dernier poème, de George Herbert (1593–1633), publié sous le titre «Antiphon» dans Le Temple (1633), avait déjà été adopté comme hymne, avec un air éloquent composé par Basil Harwood, qui y ajouta des répétitions supplémentaires du refrain. Dyson écrivit un air également énergique, dans une forme rondo qui suit la structure du poème. Le refrain apparaît à trois reprises en sol majeur, s’élevant à chaque fois vers de plus hauts sommets; les strophes modulent pour leur part dans les tonalités voisines.

Charles Wood God omnipotent reigneth
Charles Wood fut lui aussi élève de Stanford, et prit la succession de son maître comme professeur de musique à Cambridge; mais plus que Stanford, la musique ancienne l’attirait. Cet anthem provient de sa longue collaboration avec le Révérend George Woodward (1848–1934), érudit et hymnologue, avec qui il partageait un enthousiasme pour les hymnes et les carols traditionnels. L’hymne de Woodward, basé sur le Psaume 93, fut publié dans ses Chants de Syon (1904), adapté à l’air dorien du Psaume 107, tiré du psautier français versifié de 1562. Wood, expert en contrepoint du 16ème siècle, pourrait bien avoir joué un rôle dans l’harmonisation. Il écrivit plus tard une élaboration de l’hymne. L’orgue, après une introduction, relie les phrases à l’air, avant d’accompagner plus résolument la seconde strophe, plus variée et suivie d’un Amen en ré majeur. Il s’agit, comme l’écrit Ian Copley dans son étude des œuvres de Wood, d’«une pièce admirable et passionnée, enivrante à exécuter».

Ralph Vaughan Williams Lord, thou hast been our refuge
Vaughan Williams publia cette pièce sous le nom de «motet»—cependant, de toutes les œuvres de cet enregistrement, c’est celle qui lie le plus intimement un anthem en prose à un hymne versifié: à plusieurs reprises ils sont entendus simultanément. Le texte en prose reprend presque intégralement le Psaume 90 dans sa version liturgique (tirée, bien sûr, de la Grande Bible de Coverdale de 1539). L’hymne célèbre, «O God, our help in ages past», est une paraphrase du même psaume par Isaac Watts (1674–1748), publiée en 1719 dans ses Psaumes de David Imités dans le Langage du Nouveau Testament. L’air, également célèbre, par William Croft (1678–1727), composé pour un autre texte en 1708, fut prénommé Sainte Anne, d’après l’église de Soho où Croft était organiste. Strophes et air furent réunis pour la première fois par Theophania Cecil en 1814, à l’usage de la chapelle Évangélique de Saint Jean, Bedford Row, à Londres, où elle était organiste, et cette combinaison fut adoptée par HA&M en 1861. Le psaume en prose en ré mineur commence par une sorte de récitatif, chanté à l’unisson, pendant qu’une version de l’hymne en ré majeur pour toutes les voix se fait entendre en arrière-plan, pianissimo; la récitation se poursuit avec le chœur dans son entier, et mène à la tonalité de fa dièse mineur. Après un interlude à l’orgue issu de Sainte Anne, la psalmodie se prolonge, avec une ferveur toujours plus grande. L’air de l’hymne retentit alors à la trompette, jouée par Alison Balsom, avant d’être emporté dans un libre contrepoint choral et de se conclure en apothéose sur une radieuse conclusion en ré majeur.

Nicholas Temperley © 2014
Français: Gildas Tilliette

Die traditionelle englische Hymne gründete sich auf einen Prosatext der Bibel, meistens den Psalmen entnommen oder gelegentlich dem Book of Common Prayer, dem Allgemeinen Gebetsbuch. Im 19. Jahrhundert fanden metrische Texte und dazu passende Melodien zunehmend Verbreitung. Es gibt auch einige frühere Beispiele, zu denen auch einzelne Loblieder von Händel gehören. Anfangs des 19. Jahrhunderts waren viele Domchöre nicht mehr im Stande, anspruchsvolle Musik zu singen und so wurde diese durch strophisch angelegte Loblieder ersetzt. So beklagte sich 1805 John Clarke (später Clarke-Whitfeld) etwa über die „absurde, wenn nicht gar profane Einleitung der Hymnen von (William) Jackson in „siciliana“ Sätzen!…Das Loblied der sizilianischen Seefahrer!…Der portugiesische Choral (Adeste fideles)! usw. usw. als Ersatz für Hymnen!“ Eines der schönsten Beispiele für diese Bewegung ist die Fassung der klangvollen Hymne Come, Holy Ghost—(Komm, Heiliger Geist) von Thomas Attwood, des einzigen Loblieds, welches Teil der zugelassenen Gebetsbuch-Liturgie (im Ordinationsgottesdienst) war. Für den Chor von St. Paul’s Cathedral komponiert, wurde es dort am Pfingstsonntag 1831 zum ersten Mal gesungen.

Zu diesem Zeitpunkt fanden Hymnen, die nicht aus den Schriften stammten und einst als Musik für Andersgläubige verschmäht wurden, in der anglikanischen Kirche rasch Akzeptanz. Sogar die Oxfordbewegung unterstützte sie, wenn sie sich auf mittelalterliche oder andere lateinische Originale gründeten. Wie Peter Horton beweisen konnte, begannen auch Viktorianer, Loblieder als Texte für Hymnen zu verwenden. Samuel Sebastian Wesley wählte ein Loblied seines Großvaters Charles Thou judge of quick and dead—(Du Richter der Lebenden und Toten) um seine große Hymne Let us lift up our heart—(Lasset uns erheben unser Herz) zu beschließen und andere folgten seinem Beispiel. Es bedurfte eines weiteren Schrittes, um sowohl Melodie als auch Text eines bereits bestehenden Lobliedes einzuführen. Eine der frühesten Hymnen, die diesem Muster gerecht wurden, hatte ihren Ursprung in Cambridge. Die Hymne Lord, who shall dwell in thy tabernacle—(Herr, der Du wohnst in Deinem Heiligen Haus) von William Sterndale Bennett, für den Absolventensonntag 1856 in Auftrag gegeben und zum Anlass seiner Anstellung als Musikprofessor gedacht, wurde in der Universitätskirche von St. Mary aufgeführt. Passenderweise wurde für einen Teil davon die bekannte St.Mary’s-Melodie aus dem 17. Jahrhundert verwendet, welche mit einem neugeschriebenen Text versehen wurde. Es war sicher kein Zufall, dass Bennett die Musik von J. S. Bach studiert hatte.

Das Loblied oder die Hymne begann in den 80er Jahren des 19. Jahrhunderts als eigenständige Kunstform anerkannt zu werden und gewann im spätviktorianischen Zeitalter und weiter bis ins beginnende 20. Jahrhundert sehr an Popularität. Die einst nur spärlich besuchten oder gar für Außenstehende geschlossenen Gottesdienste in den Kathedralen, wurden nun der breiten Öffentlichkeit zugänglich gemacht, die den Klang vertrauter Weisen natürlich sehr zu schätzen wusste. Andererseits übernahmen auch Kirchenchöre nun vermehrt die kathedralartige Hymne. Einige dieser Loblieder oder Hymnen waren ursprünglich für Choralfeiern mit großem Chor und Orchester konzipiert worden. Die damals unlängst entdeckten Choral- und Liedsätze Johann Sebastian Bachs waren ein verlockendes Beispiel und viele Komponisten suchten nach Wegen, Loblieder in ihre Hymnen einzuschließen.

Der Erste Weltkrieg führte in vielem zu neuem Denken und dazu gehörte auch die Kritik an allem was auf elitäres Denken hindeutete. Einige kirchliche Obrigkeiten wollten gar soweit gehen auf Hymnen gänzlich zu verzichten, mit der Begründung, dass man schließlich wegen der Gottesdienste in die Kirche ginge und nicht der Chöre wegen. Dies führte zu einer Kompromisslösung: einer Hymne für den Chor, in der ein Loblied eingebettet war, in das die Kirchengemeinde einstimmen konnte. Dies wurde in The Hymn-Anthem: A New Choral Form—(Loblied-Hymne: Eine Neue Form der Chormusik) von Charles F. Waters besprochen (Musical Times, Juli 1930).

In dieser vorliegenden Aufnahme bringt der Chor von King’s College eine vielfältige Auswahl an Lobliedern und Hymnen aus der Zeit ihrer größten Popularität, d.h. von den 1890ern bis in die 30er-Jahre des 20. Jahrhunderts. Die Meisten davon verdanken ihren Ursprung den Hymns Ancient and Modern (HA&M)—(Alte und Moderne Lobgesänge), dem beherrschenden Kirchengesangsbuch der damaligen Zeit. Die Vielfalt der Formkonzepte widerspiegelt sich in ihren unterschiedlichen generischen Überschriften: Hymne, Motette, Lobgesang, Lied. Einige Hymnen paraphrasieren Bibeltexte, andere sind Gedichte, die ursprünglich nicht als Loblieder konzipiert worden waren. Ein Loblied oder eine Hymne kann bestehende Weisen, die vom 6. bis zum 19. Jahrhundert reichen, einfließen lassen oder aber eine neue Melodie ins Leben rufen, die später auch für den kirchlichen Gebrauch benutzt werden kann, wie das bei Parrys Hymne der Fall war. In manchen Fällen werden sowohl biblische Prosatexte als auch ein Loblied verwendet. Auch die musikalische Behandlung variiert von Fall zu Fall stark: es kann eine wiedererkennbare strophische Form sein, wie z.B. Thema und Variationen, oder aber die Melodie selbst dient als Motivquelle, die es zu entwickeln oder fugenartig zu behandeln gilt.

Die zwei Orgelpräludien gründen sich ebenfalls auf bekannte Hymnenmelodien. Die prächtige Orgel der King’s College Chapel eignet sich bestens für die Musik dieser Zeit und wird von Stephen Cleobury optimal eingesetzt. Der Chor bietet eine breite Palette an Stimmungen und Ausdrucksformen, von zart bis ehrfurchtgebietend, während die berühmte Akustik der King’s College Chapel dem Ganzen eine Atmosphäre der Pracht verleiht.

Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry Hear my words, ye people
Parry war nicht in erster Linie ein Komponist kirchlicher Musik doch seine Ausflüge in diese Sphäre stellten oft die Bemühungen seiner Zeitgenossen in den Schatten. Diese Hymne, welche für eine Feier der Chorgesellschaft der Diözese Salisbury in Auftrag gegeben wurde, war für ein großes Chortreffen mit Orchester, in großem Stil, mit einem raffinierten und beinahe symphonischen Orgelpart entworfen worden. Den Höhepunkt, nach der ausführlichen Entwicklung von Prosaausschnitten aus Hiob, Jesaja und den Psalmen, darunter Abschnitte in verwandten Tonarten für Bass Solo, Knabensopran-Solo und Halbchor, bildet—nach der Rückkehr zur Ausgangstonart in B—die Bearbeitung von drei Versen von O praise ye the Lord (O lobet den Herrn), eine von Henry Baker (1821–77) für die 1875 erschienene Ausgabe des Kirchengebetsbuchs HA&M geschriebene Paraphrasierung von Psalm 150. Parrys energische und erhebende Melodie ist in ABAForm geschrieben, mit einer modulierenden Sektion B für unbegleiteten Halbchor. Die Sektion A, hier einstimmig gesungen, sollte bald zur Standardmelodie für Bakers Hymne werden, unter dem Namen Laudate Dominum. Die Hymne endet mit einem ausgedehnten Amen; im letzten Akkord ertönt ein kräftiges 32’ Register.

Sir Charles Villiers Stanford O for a closer walk with God
Anders als Parry machte es sich Stanford zur Aufgabe, dem Anglikanischen Gottesdienst zeitgemäße Chormusik zu liefern. Aber dieses Stück hat einen anderen Ursprung. 1909 veröffentlichte Parry Six Bible Songs—(Sechs biblische Lieder) für Solostimme und Orgel (Op. 113). Der spezifische Zweck dieser Lieder bleibt unbekannt: Jeremy Dibble meint, dass sie „wie ein Zyklus von Solo-Kantaten wirken“. Stanford war scheinbar mit dem Ergebnis unzufrieden. Deshalb fügte er im darauff olgenden Jahr Six Hymns—(Sechs Loblieder) für Chor und Orgel hinzu, wobei er bereits bestehende Melodien einsetzte; jede davon sollte auf eines der Lieder folgen. Das vorliegende Werk war der Nummer 6 zugeordnet, A song of wisdom—(Ein Lied der Weisheit) (Ecclesiasticus xxiv). Der Liedtext besteht aus den Versen 1, 4 und 6 eines Gedichts von William Cowper (1731–1800), das 1769 geschrieben wurde: die einleitenden Worte beziehen sich auf Genesis 24. Stanford verwendete dazu die einfache Weise Caithness, die für diesen Text im Kirchengesangsbuch HA&M vom schottischen metrischen Psalter von 1635 übernommen worden war. Der erste Vers hat einen schlichten Aufbau für Knabensopran und Orgel; die zwei andern sind für SATB harmonisch variiert, mit gewissen Ergänzungen. Die Orgel liefert eine Einleitung und eine Coda.

Sir Edward Cuthbert Bairstow Blessed city, heavenly Salem
Bairstow stammte aus Yorkshire und schrieb diese Hymne für den Kirchenchor von Heaton kurz nach seiner Berufung zum Organisten am York Minster. Es handelt sich hier um eines von fünf Lobliedern aus seiner Feder und sollte zu einem seiner bekanntesten Werke werden. Blessed City wurde sogar als Titel für Francis Jacksons Biographie des Komponisten ausgewählt. Sowohl Text als auch Melodie stammen von der Prozessionshymne Urbs beata Jerusalem aus dem 9. Jahrhundert. Bairstow verwendet fünf der acht Verse in einer stark überarbeiteten Version der Übersetzung von J. M. Neale aus dem Jahre 1851. Die Melodie des cantus planus ist in dorischem Modus, doch ist Bairstows Bearbeitung alles andere als modal: sie ist durch und durch zeitgenössisch, mit einem extravaganten, vom Text inspirierten Orgelpart. Bairstow verwendet Phrasen der Melodie nach Belieben, indem er sie manchmal ausdehnt oder verändert, einen Kontrapunkt hinzufügt und sie in verwandte Tonarten moduliert. Nach einem triumphalen Höhepunkt endet die Hymne in einem stillen Gebet, mit einer im Tenor gespielten Melodie in langen Noten, und das von einem blumigen Knabensopran-Solo begleitet und von einem gedämpften Amen gefolgt wird.

Percy William Whitlock Jesu, grant me this, I pray
Whitlock studierte Orgel bei Henry Ley (so wie ich es 1945 tat, in Leys letz tem Jahr als Präzentor in Eton) und Komposition bei Stanford und Vaughan Williams. Er war Organist in Rochester cathedral von 1921–30 und endete seine Karriere als Gemeindeorganist im Bournemouth Pavilion. Diese schöne Hymne (als Loblied-Hymne bezeichnet) wurde offenbar für Rochester geschrieben. Der Text stammt von einem Loblied des 17. Jahrhunderts Dignare me, O Jesu, rogo te und wurde von Henry Baker 1861 für HA&M übersetzt. Anders als bei den meisten Lobliedern-Hymnen hat diese einen Bußcharakter, ist unbegleitet und in der Molltonart geschrieben; Malcolm Riley beschreibt sie als „nach der Art von Orlando Gibbons“. Die vier Verse sind in ABBA Form ausgelegt; auf die sonst unbekannte Melodie, die wahrscheinlich von Whitlock selbst stammt, folgt ein kurzes Amen.

Sir Charles Hubert Hastings Parry Eventide
Erst in seinen späten Lebensjahren komponierte und veröffentlichte Parry vierzehn Choralpräludien, die sich auf wohlbekannten Hymnenmelodien gründen. Bachs Einfluss ist offensichtlich, vor allem in der langen Einleitung und in den Interludien zwischen den Sätzen. Die Melodie war von William H. Monk für Henry Lytes berühmtes Abendlied Abide with me—„Bleib bei mir“ in der ersten Ausgabe von HA&M (1861) geschrieben worden. Parry durchläuft die Melodie nur einmal gemäßigten Schrittes. Seine Auslegung ist weitgehend diatonisch und verläuft ruhig und kontemplativ bis zur Zuspitzung nach Zeile 3 („and comforts flee“). Die Melodie wird hier auf einem Klarinetten-Register gespielt, doch kommt bei der Wiederholung der letz ten Verszeile ein Englischhorn-Register ins Spiel.

Sir Henry Walford Davies O sons and daughters, let us sing
Dies ist eine weitere Hymne lateinischen Ursprungs, und zwar handelt es sich um eine Osterhymne O filii et filiae von Jean Tisserand (gestorben 1494) in der Übersetzung aus dem Jahre 1851 von J. M. Neale, einem hochkirchlichen Theologen. Diese Hymne war eines der Werke von Walford Davies aus Spiritual Songs: Fourteen Short Anthems and Introits—Geistliche Lieder: Vierzehn Kurze Hymnen und Eingangslieder, die er 1918 herausgab, lange bevor er als Rundfunk-Moderator von musikalischen Sendungen berühmt wurde. Walford Davies war ein geschickter Schreiber von Chormusik. Im Falle dieses Liedes umging er die HA&M-Form der Melodie und machte von einer älteren, modalen Version mit kürzerem Halleluja Gebrauch. Er kürzte das Lied auch um die drei Strophen, welche die Zweifel des ungläubigen Thomas betrafen. Die sechs verbleibenden Strophen sind für verschiedene Soli und Teile des Chors arrangiert, doch kommt beim Halleluja-Refrain immer der ganze Chor zum Einsatz. Trotz der Vortragsbezeichnung „joyously“ (fröhlich) klingt die Musik eher besorgt. Es fehlt ihr das Gefühl des Jubels, das man zu Ostern erwarten würde. Der Chor singt bis zum letzten Vers a cappella, dann setzt die Orgel dramatisch ein und die Melodie wird auf brillante Weise ausgebaut und klingt in einem letzten, langen Schlussakkord aus.

Sir William Henry Harris O what their joy and their glory must be
Bei diesem Text handelt es sich um Neales Übersetzung eines daktylischen Gedichts des berühmten französischen Theologen und Komponisten Pierre Abélard (1079–1142), O quanta qualia sunt illa sabbata. Die anonyme Melodie stammt aus dem Pariser Antiphonar aus dem Jahre 1681 und war ursprünglich für einen anderen Text bestimmt. Sie wurde gemeinsam mit diesem Liedtext 1861 in die HA&M aufgenommen. Harris, der bei Parratt und Wood studiert hatte, war, als er diese Hymne komponierte, Organist am Christ Church College in Oxford. Später zog er zur St. George’s Chapel nach Windsor um. Er beginnt mit der einstimmig gesungenen schlichten Melodie und behandelt alle sieben Verse der Hymne in Variationsform, mit häufigen musikalischen Interludien. Die späteren Verse entfernen sich zusehends von der Melodie und deren Tonart in G-Dur, und die Tonalität durchquert sogar den „Quintenzirkel“. Dann baut sich die Musik zu einer kulminierenden Rückkehr in die letzte einstimmige Strophe auf, gefolgt von einem beruhigend traditionellen Amen über einem tonischen Orgelpunkt.

Ralph Vaughan Williams Rhosymedre
Das Orgelsolo stammt aus Three Preludes founded on Welsh Hymn Tunes (Drei Präludien nach Walisischen Hymnen), die 1920 mit einer Widmung für Alan Gray herausgegeben wurden. Die Melodie, die auch Lovely genannt wird, stammte aus der Feder von David Edwards (1805–85), Vikar von Rhosymedre in Denbighshire und wurde zu der Hymne von Charles Wesley Author of love divine für das Kirchengesangbuch English Hymnal vertont, dessen Mitherausgeber Ralph Vaughan Williams war. Sich auf das Vorbild Bachs stützend, hält er ein konstantes, gemäßigtes Niveau in der Dynamik und in der Intensität der Gefühle. Zuerst entwickelt er ein unabhängiges Motiv und bringt dann die Melodie in einem gemächlichen Tempo ein. Es ist auch bezeichnend, dass er oft parallel Quarten, Quinten und Terzen einsetzt, wo Bach vielleicht eine einzige melodische Linie verwendet hätte. Die Melodie setzt zuerst unaufdringlich im Tenorregister ein und wird dann von einer markanteren höheren Stimme abgelöst. Das Präludium endet mit einer nüchternen Wiederholung der Einleitung.

John Nicholason Ireland Vexilla regis
John Ireland ist vor allem für seine Klaviermusik und seine Lieder bekannt. Er war auch ein Kirchenmusiker, doch abgesehen von seiner berühmten Motette Greater love hath no man ist diese Hymn for Passion Sunday—„Hymne für Passionssonntag“ das einzige Werk von ihm, das auch wirklich als Hymne bezeichnet werden könnte. Er schrieb sie als 19-Jähriger für die Holy Trinity Church, Sloane Street, London, wo er seine erste Stelle als Organist innehatte, während er noch bei Stanford Komposition studierte und war für Solisten, Chor, Blechbläser und Orgel arrangiert. Die alte Hymne Vexilla regis prodeunt von Venantius Fortunatus aus dem Jahre 569 war von Palestrina, Alessandro Scarlatti, Bruckner, Gounod, Liszt, Vaughan Williams und vielen Anderen vertont worden. John Ireland verwendete dazu die Übersetzung von Neale. Doch anstatt auf die alte Melodie gründete er den Großteil der Hymne auf ein eigenes, eindringliches Thema in c-Moll mit modalem Charakter, welches zuerst einstimmig von der Orgel verkündet wird. Die Entwicklung ist ausgezeichnet, doch hatte Ireland noch nicht zu einem beständigen persönlichen Stil gefunden. Nach dem dramatischen Schluss der dritten Strophe in C-Dur auf einem überraschenden E-Dur Akkord („from the Tree“), kling das dreiteilige Metrum mit Knabensopran-Solo in dieser Tonart, gefolgt von der gleichen Musik für a cappella Quartett, geradezu früh-viktorianisch. Ähnlich ergeht es der Rückkehr zu C-Dur, obwohl sie mit post-Wagnerscher Chromatik in einem Gleichklang in G auf dem Wort „prey“ angegangen wird. Nach einem kulminierenden hohen C ist das Amen ein Fugato, welches sich auf den ersten Satz der mittelalterlichen Melodie gründet.

Sir George Dyson Praise
Dyson, einer der führenden Komponisten und ein Autor von Schriften über musikalische Themen, war eigentlich kein professioneller Kirchenmusiker. Er studierte Komposition im Royal College of Music bei Stanford. 1935 veröffentlichte er Three Songs of Praise—„drei Lobgesänge“ für begleiteten Chor, für die er sorgfältig Gedichte frühmoderner englischer Autoren aussuchte und die er „Praise“, „Lauds“ und „A Poet’s Hymn“ betitelte. Dieses Gedicht von George Herbert (1593–1633) wurde als „Antiphon“ im The Temple (1633) herausgegeben und war bereits von Basil Harwood als ein Loblied mit einer mitreißenden Melodie bearbeitet worden. Harwood hatte außerdem einige Wiederholungen des Refrains hinzugefügt. Dyson schrieb seine gleichermaßen robuste Melodie in einer auf die Gedichtsstruktur angepassten Rondo-Form. Der Refrain erklingt drei Mal in G-Dur und steigert sich dabei jedes Mal zu einer höheren Krönung; die dazwischen liegenden Strophen modulieren dabei in benachbarte Tonarten.

Charles Wood God omnipotent reigneth
Charles Wood, ein weiterer Schüler Stanfords, wurde schließlich als Nachfolger seines Lehrers Musikprofessor in Cambridge. Aber er interessierte sich mehr für alte Musik als Stanford. Diese Hymne ist eines der Ergebnisse seiner lebenslangen Zusammenarbeit mit dem Akademiker und Hymnologen George Woodward (1848–1934). Beide teilten eine große Begeisterung für traditionelle Hymnen und Weihnachtslieder. Woodwards Hymne, die sich auf den Psalm 93 gründet, wurde in seinen Songs of Syon (1904) veröffentlicht und war zu der dorischen Melodie von Psalm 107 adaptiert worden, welche aus dem metrischen Psalter von 1562 aus Frankreich stammte. Als Experte der Kontrapunkttechnik des 16. Jahrhunderts, dürfte Wood bei der Harmonisierung eine Rolle gespielt haben. Später schrieb er diese Ausarbeitung des Lobliedes. Nach einer Einleitung verbindet die Orgel die Sätze der Melodie und begleitet dann als Ganzes die abwechslungsreiche zweite Strophe, welche von einem Amen in D-Dur gefolgt wird. Ian Copley schrieb in seiner Studie über Woods Werk, dass es sich dabei um ein „prächtiges und feuriges Werk handle, das berauschend zu spielen sei.“

Ralph Vaughan Williams Lord, Thou hast been our refuge
Vaughan Williams veröffentlichte dieses Werk als Motette. Doch von all den Beispielen in dieser Aufnahme ist es die gründlichste Mischung einer Prosa-Hymne mit einer metrischen Hymne: an mehreren Stellen sind sie gleichzeitig zu hören. Der Prosatext beinhaltet beinahe den gesamten Psalm 90 in der Gebetsbuchversion (die natürlich aus Coverdales Great Bible von 1539 stammt). Die berühmte Hymne O God, our help in ages past („Gott, unsere Hilfe in vergangenen Zeiten“) ist eine Paraphrase des gleichen Psalms von Isaac Watts (1674–1748), welcher in seinen Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament 1719 herausgegeben wurde. Die ebenso berühmte Melodie von William Croft (1678–1727), die für einen andern Text im Jahre 1708 komponiert worden war, wurde St. Anne genannt, nach der Kirche in Soho benannt, wo Croft Organist gewesen war. Text und Melodie wurden erstmals 1814 durch Theophania Cecil für den Gebrauch in der Evangelical proprietary chapel of St. John in London zusammengefügt, wo sie als Organistin wirkte und diese Kombination von Text und Melodie wurde 1861 im Kirchengesangsbuch HA&M aufgenommen.

Der Prosa-Psalm in d-Moll wird durch eine Art von einstimmig gesungenem Rezitativ eingeleitet, mit einer SATB-Version der Hymne in D-Dur, die pianissimo im Hintergrund zu hören ist. Die Rezitation wird vom Chor in voller Besetz ung fortgesetzt und geht dann in Fis-Moll über. Nach einem Orgelzwischenspiel, das auf St. Anne zurückgeht, nimmt das Psalmodieren an Leidenschaftlichkeit zu. Dann spielt Alison Balsom auf ihrer Trompete die Melodie mit feurigem Klang; anschließend wird die Hymne in freien choralen Kontrapunkten zerlegt, bis sie in einem prachtvollen D-Dur-Abschluss ihre Krönung findet.

Nicholas Temperley © 2014
Deutsch: Paul Hoegger

Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...