Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

William Wallace (1860-1940)

Creation Symphony & other orchestral works

BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Martyn Brabbins (conductor)
Originally issued on CDA66987
Recording details: June 1997
Henry Wood Hall, Glasgow, Scotland
Produced by Martin Compton
Engineered by Tony Faulkner
Release date: September 2014
Total duration: 73 minutes 30 seconds

Cover artwork: The Dawn, Loch Torridon by William Turner of Oxford (1789-1862)
Private Collection / © Agnew's, London / Bridgeman Art Library, London
 
1
Prelude to The Eumenides  [10'40]
Pelléas and Mélisande Suite
2
3
Movement 4: Spinning Song  [3'58] FREE DOWNLOAD TRACK
4
Creation Symphony in C sharp minor  [47'04]
5
6
7
8

Prior to the making of this recording in 1997 it seems that no one had performed Wallace’s Creation Symphony for nearly a hundred years and yet, in the history of the symphony in Britain, it is unprecedented in its scope and daring. The work guides us through the first few verses of the Book of Genesis, but not in the literalistic manner of, say, Haydn’s Creation; rather Wallace conjures up intense emotions as a response to the contemplation of such poetic symbolism. (Many fascinating aspects of this symbolism are detailed by John Purser in the accompanying booklet, including strands interweaving Wallace’s own life with the business of Creation.)

Wallace’s Pelléas and Mélisande Suite predates the compositions by Debussy and Sibelius on the same theme by several years. It is a work of extravagantly heart-on-sleeve passion, and yet both this Suite and the equally rewarding Prelude to The Eumenides remain virtually unknown.

Reviews

'Another Hyperion winner' (Gramophone)

'It is incredible that a composer of this strength has been so overlooked. On the evidence of this recording alone he should be treated as a national treasure' (The Scotsman)

'Three superb romantic scores. The symphony is a major discovery' (Yorkshire Post)

Other recommended albums

Wallace: Symphonic Poems
CDH55461Composers of World War I
Bach (CPE): Württemberg Sonatas
Studio Master: CDA67995Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Brahms: Symphonies Nos 1 & 2
Studio Master: LSO0733Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Elgar: Enigma Variations
Studio Master: SIGCD168Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Janáček: Orchestral Music
This album is not yet available for downloadSACDA67517Super-Audio CD
Notwithstanding the great success of Hyperion’s earlier album of Wallace’s symphonic poems, recording Wallace’s Creation Symphony was an inspired leap in the dark. It seems that nobody had performed the work in nearly a hundred years and yet, in the history of the symphony in Britain at the time of its composition, it is unprecedented in scope and daring. The Prelude to The Eumenides and the three movements from the Pelléas and Mélisande Suite are also virtually unknown; this is their first recording.

William Wallace was born in 1860 and, like Hamish MacCunn (see Hyperion CDA66815), was a son of Greenock. He was a pupil at Fettes College, Edinburgh, and went on to study medicine, graduating with the MB and MCh from Glasgow University in 1885. After a further period studying ophthalmology in Vienna, Paris and Moorfields, he returned to graduate with the MD from Glasgow in 1888. But it had not always been a happy time. His father James was a distinguished surgeon and ambitious for him; when William went his own way there were bitter divisions. His mother wrote to him shortly after he had left home in the spring of 1882:

My Dear Willie, It wrung my heart to see you go last night in such a state and with such cruel words ringing in your ears and mine—the only thing I can say is, try to forget them …Ever my dear son, your truly grieved mother.

The struggle with his father was still continuing in 1885 and, soon after gaining his doctorate in 1888, he took up the study of music at the Royal Academy of Music in London; the ear had proved stronger than the eye. However, two terms at the RAM were enough for him (not surprising at twenty-eight years of age), and thereafter he was self-taught. He was one of the six rebels who included his younger contemporary Bantock (also the son of a Scottish-based surgeon) who challenged the conservatism of the music schools of the time. With Bantock (see Hyperion CDS44281/6) Wallace published The New Quarterly Musical Review, frequently editing it with Anderton when Bantock was away. In a letter of 1904 Wallace asks that the Royal College of Music jury give a chance to ‘even the most bizarre and so-called eccentric compositions that are sent in’, and with respect to controversies at the Leeds Festival cites his intention to ‘march in the direction of the guns’!

The Wallace household must have been a fascinating one, for he married the distinguished sculptress Ottilie Helen MacLaren, daughter of Lord MacLaren. Wallace dedicated his A Suite in the Olden Style for piano to her. She studied with Rodin and exhibited regularly at the Royal Academy of Arts (though when in 1928 she was unable to enter William promptly produced a painting, Waterloo Drum, of a corner of their own house in London and submitted it to ensure the family was represented; it was accepted and duly hung on the line). Theirs was a relationship of the deepest and most enduring love, enshrined in their moving correspondence now held in the National Library of Scotland.

The 1914–1918 War saw Wallace working more or less continuously in the Royal Army Medical Corps, from which he retired in 1919 with the rank of Captain. By the end of it he was fifty-eight years of age, had taken only three weeks of leave and had reported on nineteen thousand cases, many of which he had personally attended to. He must have been completely drained, yet he went on to be a Professor of Harmony and Composition and Professorial Chief of the library at the Royal Academy of Music in his later years.

Wallace’s major works are now well represented on this and Hyperion’s preceding Wallace recording. There remain unrecorded only two of his six symphonic poems (one of which is currently lost); two orchestral suites and an orchestral rhapsody; a bitingly satirical choral ballad, The Massacre of the MacPhersons, which makes a ridiculous combination of snippets from Wagner’s ‘Ring’ and traditional Scottish themes; and a choral symphony, Koheleth, which awaits rediscovery and may be unfinished. Wallace also published several books on music theory and history. These include wide-ranging and challenging works analysing the nature and development of the musical faculty in humankind, and studies of great insight into Wagner and Liszt, whose influence on his own music is clear. Wallace died in 1940.

Stylistically, Wallace is much more radical than either Mackenzie or MacCunn, particularly in his freer development of structure. Bantock was more splendidly blatant: and immediate symphonic predecessors were, like Bruckner, more determinedly massive or, like Liszt and Mahler (Wallace’s exact contemporary), more emotionally ostentatious. Wallace, instead, achieves his own magnificence by uniting passion and philosophy. His style is that of high German romanticism, with only occasional references to Scottish traditional music. His chromatic harmonies are unsympathetic to folk idioms; his melodies are driven by the harmonies rather than the other way about; and his thematic development is thoroughly organic. In all but the last of these respects he is quite different from his younger contemporary Carl Nielsen, yet Wallace’s meaning, notably in passages of the Creation Symphony, looks towards the work of Nielsen (born in the same Protestant latitudes) rather than towards the great Austrian and German symphonists. His conviction is not only intellectual and emotional: it has a moral force which is never didactic and, though triumphant, there is no triumphalism in its beauty and splendour.

Prelude to The Eumenides of Aeschylus
‘It profiteth a man to gain wisdom through trouble.’ Thus Wallace heads his score, being kind enough to translate the Greek which precedes it. It is the role of the Furies—the sisters of Fate—to punish the guilty: in this case Orestes for the murder of his mother Clytemnestra, who had murdered her husband, Orestes’ father. Orestes is defended by Apollo in the ensuing trial, and Athene, the goddess of wisdom, has the casting vote. She dismays the Furies by giving a verdict of justifiable homicide, but wins them over by offering them asylum, a new role and elevated status in Athens, and a new name—the ‘Eumenides’, or ‘benefactors’. The play reflects the gradual maturing of the legal system in Athens in the fifth century before Christ, leading away from the inexorability of vengeance towards a more humane approach.

The Prelude opens with the leitmotif of Fate, driving and relentless. The reply to this comes in the form of an oboe solo, reasoned but full of feeling, which, as it increases in fervour, leads us back to the less rational aspects of the Furies. As the musical argument swings to and fro, so it becomes clear that the two themes are related to each other, the first becoming subsumed in the more rational character of that for Athene. It is in her honour that the concluding hymn in the brass is heard, accompanied by a variant of her own theme.

August Manns conducted the first performance in the Crystal Palace, London, on 21 October 1893.

Pelléas and Mélisande Suite
Maeterlinck published his symbolist drama Pelléas et Mélisande in 1892. Wallace’s Suite was first performed at the New Brighton Tower with the composer conducting on 19 August 1900. It therefore predates Debussy’s incomparable opera of the same name (completed and first produced in 1902) and Sibelius’s Suite (1905). Only three of the five movements are included here—but the selection (the last three movements) is one Wallace himself proposed. The movements omitted are ‘The Lost Mélisande’ and ‘The King’s March’.

The story is simple enough. Pelléas falls in love with his older brother’s young wife, Mélisande. The brother, Golaud, heir to King Arkel’s throne, becomes aware of this and kills him; and Mélisande, having presented her husband with a child, dies of grief. But this simplicity cloaks a profound symbolism in which the nature of innocence is questioned and in which its abuse inevitably leads to tragedy.

‘The Love of Pelléas for Mélisande’: innocent or no, this is a passionate love, given rich expression on bass clarinet followed by the strings in rising sequences of desire. The hushed delicacy of the medieval setting is also present, but the conclusion of the movement matches the reality in the play, in which Pelléas and Mélisande have been prepared to give themselves wholly to each other, knowing that her husband is watching them.

‘Spinning Song’: this is a little character-piece, showing a delicate and lighter side to Wallace’s character as a composer, especially when compared to the dark undercurrents of Sibelius’s interpretation of the same scene. Wallace chooses to realize the unaffected innocence of Mélisande in simplistic form and melody. She is scarcely beyond childhood, and the music reflects her dangerous naivety which has so captivated the two brothers. In such a world of natural melodic charm it seems that cruelty would be an utter impossibility.

‘The Death of Mélisande’: coming after the innocence of the ‘Spinning Song’, the extravagance of the grief of this movement is all the more telling. This is a vast grief, not only because it occurs in the palace of a king and is for the wife of a king’s son who has died in the wake of her lover, but also because this grief is not innocent. Golaud, having murdered his own brother, is left racked with doubt, not knowing whether Pelléas and Mélisande were, after all, merely children, not able to help what they did.

The contrast with the later, muted treatment of this by Debussy and Sibelius is startling. Dramatic funeral drums and gong punctuate the passionate descending phrase derived from a theme originally associated with Pelléas’s declaration of love. The central section recalls that love, but the final lento e dolente, heralded by funereal trumpets and the return of the drums, fragments into hushed misery.

Creation Symphony in C sharp minor
The Creation Symphony was first performed at one of Bantock’s New Brighton concerts in 1899 and subsequently in Bournemouth; but composition had started in 1896 when Wallace’s life-long love affair with Ottilie MacLaren was opening its first buds. He was writing to her almost daily, and his excitement is palpable:

I have begun a Symphony on The Creation—first movement Chaos—not the noisy idea but deep very mysterious and weird—sullen—then on this comes ‘the Spirit of God on the waters’, the evolution of Kosmos out of Chaos, then the divine idea of man, just hinted at and not fully complete till it appears in the sixth day movement; ending with ‘Let there be light’—bright trumpets very high up. This movement is sketched, and I am off my head with joy!

Wallace thought of God’s Creation as a work of art. Ottilie was studying with Rodin in Paris at the time; and Wallace, having shaken off the repressive influence of his father and changed from medicine to music, was exulting in his own freedom as a creative artist. He and Ottilie felt a profound intimacy with the whole idea of Creation, and Wallace even embedded the numerological values of his own and Ottilie’s names into the structure of the work (see below and the ‘Note on Wallace’s Use of Numerology’). He makes the connections clear, writing to Ottilie on 31 January 1896:

You won’t perhaps realize the musical idea, but translate it into your own work, and it will be clear as day. When I think of it I seem to see your patient fingers making Kosmos out of the Chaos clay—and the mystery of your art will lead to appreciation and understanding of all. I don’t believe in the ultimate happiness of the man who says one art is enough for a lifetime, for even a lifetime is too little to know one art thoroughly, But everyone can translate into his own tongue the work of others, absorb it till pictures appear as symphonies, and symphonies as sculpture.

This excitement and intimacy with the act of creation evoked from Wallace a corresponding awe at the vastness of God’s conception, and natural modesty in relation to his own place in the history of music:

And some of these days all my work will be forgotten in that of the king who is coming. But still a tiny bit of me will live in his work, just as in my own weak way I have soaked in the others who have gone before, and feeling that if it had not been for them where would I be!

Wallace was a deeply thoughtful Christian: his verse-play on the subject of the Passion, The Divine Surrender, was published the year before he started work on the Creation Symphony. Originally intended for a music-drama, Wallace had recast it in spoken form. It achieves a fine intellectual balance between the Jewish, Roman and Christian points of view and, like his music, is the product of a passionate and balanced mind.

As a composer Wallace’s modesty is disarming, for this is a work like no other. H Orsmond Anderton (one of the group of rebels referred to above), described the Creation Symphony thus:

… a big work in every sense. It is scored for large festival orchestra and shows the ‘passion for the universal’ in the scope and range of its ideas as well as in their treatment. The method is a reflection of the evolutionary process of nature, one subject growing out of another, and all springing from the initial germinal idea. There are four movements, leading up to ‘Man’ in the last, which contains passages of an occult nature referring to the ultimate dissolution of the flesh and man’s attainment of a purely spiritual state. It is to be hoped that an opportunity will soon occur of hearing this deeply significant work. ( Musical Opinion, May 1920)

It is pleasing to be able to endorse Anderton’s opinion and also to explain some of the more arcane significances in the work, for it is unified not only by its thematic material, but also by a structure which taps into ancient mystical values attached to number, expressed in simple coded forms of the Hebrew and English alphabets in particular (see ‘Note’). This, then, is not a naturalistic work. In fact Wallace, in his own programme note for the first performance (which he conducted), distanced himself from the inspired naturalism of Haydn’s Creation, and the pictorialism of Richard Strauss:

Regarded in its poetic significance as a Liturgical Hymn, and not as a record of events, the first chapter of the Book of Genesis presents a theme suggestive of symphonic treatment. Since the aeons into which the Work of Creation was divided cannot be interpreted in a strictly literal sense, the music aims at depicting the emotion which the contemplation of the theme in its poetic and symbolical meaning is able to awaken.

Adagio — Allegro: ‘In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep.’ It is these opening words of the Bible which inspire the opening bars of the symphony: a passage of profound mystery and great orchestral daring—double basses divided and solo tuba representing ‘“emptiness and space”, the correct and literal meaning of the Greek word “chaos”’, as Wallace himself describes it. The choice of C sharp minor as the main key is designed to produce a dark, veiled colouring that contains within itself the potential of brilliance in its relative E major—especially when, in Wallace’s days, horns and trumpets could be pitched in E.

The challenging dotted rhythms which introduced the main Allegro, and a process of gradual transformation of the thematic material, might be taken as the latent energy of light: indeed the theme for light, which emerges in the closing moderato, is derived from that of the void. The movement anticipates the triumph of the whole symphony, reaching a climax of cosmic power, before it ends with an ecstatic but calm hymn representing ‘light’, in Wallace’s own words, ‘exemplified by very soft strains, as an influence that comes from above’. It is reminiscent of his first tone poem, The Passing of Beatrice, in which a vision of heavenly love is realized.

Andantino: ‘And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: He made the stars also.’ The Andantino starts with an extraordinary evocation of the poised mystery of starlight, using a simultaneous double augmentation of the opening phrase with exquisite orchestral colouring and minimalist purity, nearly a century before its time. The largo introduces the first true melody of the movement, tracing the beautiful and stately progress of the moon. But the symbolic purity of the moon is far from passionless. Again we are reminded of The Passing of Beatrice and the anticipation of spiritual consummation which leads logically to the striding theme of the sun. This is heard against the re-worked texture of the opening section of the movement, and is followed by all three themes in combination. This trinity of light is also symbolic of the Trinity of the Godhead from which it emanates, reaching towards a triumphant fanfare as the sun rises to a radiant zenith to bring the movement to a close.

Allegro: ‘And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear.’ The movement is a kind of scherzo starting with a restless figure based on the unresolved interval of the tritone and suggesting the restlessness of the oceans. As it gathers force, a new theme emerges from the brass—‘in the character of a sea song’, as Wallace puts it—and is succeeded by a pastoral theme identified with the earth. After a return of the opening restlessness, the two themes are combined in a closing section of Wagnerian grandeur.

Allegro maestoso: ‘So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created He him; male and female created He them.’ A magnificent fanfare heralds the culmination of the symphony—the creation of man on the sixth day. ‘To attach a verbal meaning to each individual phrase is as impossible as is the task of analysing the human being’, declared Wallace. But he describes the movement as mainly triumphal, though drawing attention to ‘phrases which may be considered as symbolizing the ultimate dissolution of the flesh that is as grass’. As a doctor and surgeon Wallace was familiar enough with the dissolution of the flesh, but this movement is primarily symbolic of the creative capacity of humankind—‘male and female created He them’—and the triumph is as much the triumph of love and, specifically, his own and Ottilie’s love, placing himself and her as a kind of Adam and Eve in the newly created Eden of his finale, upon which the second-movement theme of the sun rises in splendour.

Wallace’s skilful development of his thematic material, and the tautness of the weave of its evolution (not to mention the vividness of the orchestral colours, singly and in combination), would merit pages of analysis. But above all, it is itself a creation born of an unfaltering conviction, which makes of this work a seamless cloth of beauty, originality and power.

A Note on Wallace’s Use of Numerology in the Creation Symphony
That Wallace was aware of the numerological significance of the work is clear. The fact that the last two movements are each 293 bars long, and that he kept track of the bar numbers in his score by placing rehearsal numbers (rather than letters) at ten-bar intervals, is in itself telling. But when we examine the significance of the bar numbers in detail, his use of the scheme is inescapable. To understand it a simple diagram of the ‘26’ and ‘800’ values of the alphabet is necessary (see below). Numerologically, the first movement represents a monad—the single cell of the earth before the Spirit of God caused it to divide. The Hebrew words for ‘the earth’ in Genesis have a numerical value of 296—the number of bars in the movement. Wallace wrote that the end of the movement represents the advent of light and it is likely that its appearance at bar 271 is deliberate, for 271 is the reversal of 172, the number for ‘chaos’ and the inherent darkness which light reverses. Bar 172 itself is the fortissimo climax of the central chaos section. The same themes build up again, but this time they climax at bar 222 in a maestoso in which the theme of the last movement is anticipated.

The second movement is 258 bars long. This represents the triple Godhead for it is 86 times 3, and 86 is the number for ‘Elohim’—one of the sacred names for God. It also represents the three sources of heavenly light—stars, moon and sun—which are the subject of the movement. However, just as Wallace described the clay which his sculptress wife worked as ‘chaos’, so ‘chaos’ is still present within the Creation, and it is only at bar 172 that the final section integrating the three separate sources of light commences. That 172 is twice 86 can be taken as significant in a Christian context—Father and Son, but without the Holy Spirit which is the active principle of Godhead in the act of Creation, whether in the Spirit of God moving upon the waters, or in the dove of the Holy Spirit impregnating Mary, the mother of the Son of God. In such an interpretation 172 is the Godhead without the Spirit and therefore, in a sense, Chaos.

The third and fourth movements can be taken together. The third starts with the name of Elohim in the opening 86 bars of Allegro, but the symbolism in these movements is also personal. Just as the first movement represents a monad (the singleness of the ‘world’), and the second represents the Holy Trinity and a trinity of sources of light, so the last two movements represent the duality of water and earth, and of woman and man, respectively. However, it is not their separateness, but their coming together that is celebrated.

Wallace used the Hebrew letter Shin as his signature at the end of each movement of the score. In 1888 he had published words and music of a Carmen Glasguense in honour of Glasgow University, the bold cover design of a student with mortar-board, books and symbolic letter Shin being his own. The student, in doctoral gown, is probably a self-portrait, the letter Shin meaning ‘song’ being like a W for William Wallace, and also representing the eye and having symbolic associations with the six-bar phrases of the music and six-line poetic structure. Six is the number of days of the Creation and is particularly associated with the creation of man. However, 6 x 60 is 360, and this is the value of the letter Shin in the Hebrew ‘plenitude’ alphabet. Wallace applied this value directly to his own situation. His wife’s maiden name was MacLaren, which has a value of 67 in the ‘26’ alphabet. But on her approaching marriage she would change her name to Wallace, using it professionally as well as personally. By removing MacLaren (subtracting 67 from 360) the result is 293—the number of bars in each of the last two movements of the symphony.

The symbolism is not merely that of the loss of a name. The name is a maiden name; it symbolizes virginity. The new number represents the two names, the two sexes, each yielding to the other to produce a number symbolizing their union. In the same ‘26’ alphabet, by an extraordinary coincidence which clearly struck Wallace, the names ‘William Wallace’ and ‘Ottilie MacLaren’ themselves add up to the same number—293.

We are not done with coincidence, for in the ‘800’ English alphabet ‘William Wallace’ adds up to 1,189 and ‘Ottilie MacLaren’ to 733. Subtracting the one from the other gives 456, and this number is the sum of Adam (46) and Eve (410) in the same ‘800’ alphabet. There is no question that these are coincidences, but equally there is no doubt that Wallace was aware of and made use of them.

I am deeply indebted to the generous scholarship of David Crookes in preparing this note.

1 – A – 1
2 – B – 2
3 – C – 3
4 – D – 4
5 – E – 5
6 – F – 6
7 – G – 7
8 – H – 8
9 – I – 9
10 – J – 10
11 – K – 20
12 – L – 30
13 – M – 40
14 – N – 50
15 – O – 60
16 – P – 70
17 – Q – 80
18 – R – 90
19 – S – 100
20 – T – 200
21 – U – 300
22 – V – 400
23 – W – 500
24 – X – 600
25 – Y – 700
26 – Z – 800

John Purser © 1997

Nonobstant le vif succès de l’album Hyperion consacré aux Poèmes symphoniques de Wallace, l’enregistrement de la Symphonie de la Création fut un saut inspiré dans l’inconnu. Cette œuvre, qui fut pourtant, au moment de sa composition, d’une envergure et d’une audace sans précédent dans l’histoire de la symphonie britannique, n’avait apparemment jamais été enregistrée en près d’un siècle. Le Prélude de l’Euménides et les trois mouvements de la suite Pelléas et Mélisande, eux aussi presque inconnus, sont enregistrés ici pour la première fois.

Né en 1860 à Greenock, comme Hamish MacCunn (cf. Hyperion CDA66815), William Wallace alla au Fettes College d’Édimbourg puis à l’université de Glasgow, où il obtint sa licence en médecine et en chirurgie en 1885. Après avoir étudié l’ophtalmologie à Vienne, à Paris et à Moorfields, il rentra à Glasgow et fut reçu docteur en médecine en 1888. Mais tout n’avait pas toujours été heureux; son père James, chirurgien émérite, avait de grands projets pour lui, et d’amères dissensions surgirent lorsque William voulut agir à sa guise. Sa mère lui écrivit ainsi au printemps 1882, peu après qu’il eut quitté la maison:

Mon cher Willie, Cela me fendit le cœur de te voir partir la nuit dernière dans un tel état, avec des paroles si cruelles résonnant à tes oreilles, et aux miennes—la seule chose que je puisse dire, c’est: «essaie de les oublier …» Cordialement à mon cher fils, ta mère vraiment peinée.

En 1885, il était toujours en lutte contre son père et, peu après l’obtention de son doctorat en 1888, il entreprit d’étudier la musique à la Royal Academy of Music de Londres: l’oreille s’était révélée plus forte que l’œil. Cependant, deux trimestres à la RAM lui suffirent (ce qui n’est guère étonnant si l’on songe qu’il avait alors vingt-huit ans), et il devint autodidacte. Il fut l’un des six rebelles—au nombre desquels figurait son cadet Bantock, également fils d’un chirurgien basé en Écosse—qui défièrent l’autorité des écoles de musique de l’époque. Avec Bantock (voir Hyperion CDS44281/6), il publia The New Quarterly Musical Review, fréquemment éditée avec Anderton, en l’absence de Bantock. Dans une lettre de 1904, Wallace demande au jury du Royal College of Music de donner une chance «aux compositions les plus bizarres et soi-disant excentriques qui [lui] sont envoyées»; quant aux controverses du Leeds Festival, il annonce son intention de «marcher en direction des fusils»!

Le couple Wallace dut être fascinant, le compositeur ayant épousé Ottilie Helen MacLaren, fille de Lord MacLaren, à laquelle il dédia A Suite in the Olden Style, pour piano. Éminente sculptrice, elle étudia avec Rodin et exposa régulièrement à la Royal Academy of Arts (en 1928, elle ne put s’inscrire et William exécuta promptement un tableau, Waterloo Drum, peinture d’un coin de leur maison londonienne, qu’il soumit pour s’assurer que la famille fût représentée; acceptée, l’œuvre eut dûment les honneurs de la cimaise). Leur relation fut du plus profond et du plus durable amour, enchâssé dans leur émouvante correspondance (désormais conservée à la National Library of Scotland).

La guerre de 1914–1918 vit le compositeur travailler plus ou moins continûment dans le Royal Army Medical Corps, dont il sortit capitaine en 1919. À la fin du conflit, Wallace, âgé de cinquante-huit ans, n’avait pris que trois semaines de permission et avait rédigé un rapport sur dix-neuf mille cas, pour la plupart traités personnellement. Complètement exténué, il n’en devint pas moins, par la suite, Professor of Harmony and Composition et Professorial Chief de la bibliothèque de la Royal Academy of Music.

Grâce à cet enregistrement—et au précédent album Hyperion consacré à ce compositeur—les principales œuvres de Wallace sont désormais bien représentées et seules quelques pièces n’ont pas encore été enregistrées: deux des six poèmes symphoniques (dont l’un est actuellement perdu); deux suites orchestrales et une rhapsodie orchestrale; une ballade chorale acerbement satirique, The Massacre of the MacPhersons, qui mélange ridiculement des bribes du «Ring» de Wagner à des thèmes écossais traditionnels; et une symphonie chorale, Koheleth, qui attend d’être redécouverte, voire achevée. Wallace publia également plusieurs livres consacrés à la théorie et à l’histoire musicales, dont des ouvrages stimulants, de grande portée, analysant la nature et le développement de la faculté musicale dans l’humanité, et des études d’une grande perspicacité sur Wagner et Liszt—compositeurs qui exercèrent une influence manifeste sur ses propres œuvres. Wallace mourut en 1940.

Stylistiquement, Wallace est beaucoup plus radical que Mackenzie ou MacCunn, en particulier dans son développement structural plus libre. Bantock fut plus superbement criant; quant aux prédécesseurs symphonistes immédiats, ils furent, à l’instar de Bruckner, plus massifs, avec détermination, ou, comme Liszt et Mahler (contemporain exact de Wallace), plus émotionnellement ostentatoires. Wallace, lui, atteint à sa propre magnificence en unissant passion et philosophie. Son style est celui du haut romantisme allemand, avec de rares références à la musique traditionnelle écossaise. Ses harmonies chromatiques sont insensibles aux idiomes populaires; ses mélodies sont conduites par les harmonies plutôt que l’inverse; enfin, son développement thématique est profondément organique. Excepté sur ce dernier point, il est totalement différent de son cadet Carl Nielsen, même si son intention regarde davantage vers l’œuvre de ce contemporain (né sous les mêmes latitudes protestantes) que vers les grands symphonistes autrichiens et allemands, notamment dans certains passages de la Creation Symphony. Sa conviction n’est pas seulement intellectuelle et émotionnelle: elle recèle une force morale jamais didactique et, quoique triomphantes, sa beauté et sa splendeur sont dénuées de tout triomphalisme.

Prélude de l’Euménides d’Eschyle
«Il profite à un homme d’acquérir la sagesse au travers des difficultés.» Ainsi Wallace intitule-t-il sa partition, en ayant la bonté de traduire le grec qui la précède. Le rôle des Érinyes (les sœurs du Destin) consiste à punir les coupables—en l’occurrence, Oreste, jugé pour le meurtre de sa mère Clytemnestre, qui avait assassiné son mari, le père d’Oreste. Oreste est défendu par Apollon lors du procès qui s’ensuit, où Athéna, déesse de la sagesse, a voix prépondérante. Elle consterne les Érinyes en rendant un verdict d’homicide légitime, mais les rallie en leur offrant l’asile, un rôle nouveau et un statut élevé à Athènes, et en les rebaptisant du nom d’«Euménides», ou «bienfaitrices». La pièce reflète la maturation progressive du système judiciaire athénien au Ve siècle av. J. C., qui s’éloigne de l’inexorabilité de la vengeance pour tendre à une approche plus humaine.

Le Prélude s’ouvre sur le leitmotiv du destin, fort et implacable, auquel répond un solo de hautbois, raisonné mais tout de sensibilité, qui nous ramène, au gré de sa ferveur grandissante, aux aspects moins rationnels des Érinyes. À mesure que l’argument musical se balance d’avant en arrière, il devient clair que les deux thèmes sont affiliés, le premier devenant subsumé sous le caractère plus rationnel de celui d’Athéna. C’est en l’honneur de cette dernière que nous entendons l’hymne conclusive, jouée par les cuivres et accompagnée par une variante du thème même de la déesse.

August Manns dirigea la première exécution de cette pièce au Crystal Palace de Londres, le 21 octobre 1893.

Suite «Pelléas et Mélisande»
Maeterlinck publia son drame symboliste Pelléas et Mélisande en 1892; la première de la Suite de Wallace se tint à la New Brighton Tower, le 19 août 1900, sous la direction du compositeur—soit avant l’incomparable opéra du même nom composé par Debussy (achevé et produit pour la première fois en 1902), et avant la Suite de Sibelius (1905). Seuls trois des cinq mouvements figurent ici, mais selon un choix (les trois derniers mouvements) proposé par Wallace lui-même. Les mouvements omis sont «La Mélisande perdue» et «La marche du roi».

L’histoire est relativement simple (Pelléas tombe amoureux de la jeune femme de son frère aîné, Mélisande. Malheureusement, son frère, Golaud, héritier du trône du roi Arkel, l’apprend et le tue; quant à Mélisande, elle meurt de chagrin après avoir offert un enfant à son mari), mais cette simplicité masque un profond symbolisme, qui voit la nature de l’innocence remise en question et son abus conduire inévitablement à la tragédie.

«L’amour de Pelléas pour Mélisande»: qu’il soit ou non innocent, cet amour est passionné et se voit conférer une riche expression à la clarinette basse, suivie des cordes dans des séquences de désir ascendantes. La profonde délicatesse de la mise en musique médiévale est également présente, mais la conclusion du mouvement correspond à la réalité de la pièce, dans laquelle Pelléas et Mélisande ont été préparés à se donner pleinement l’un à l’autre, tout en se sachant observés par le mari de Mélisande.

«Fileuse»: cette petite pièce de caractère montre un aspect délicat et plus léger du Wallace compositeur, surtout comparé aux sombres tensions sous-jacentes qui animent cette même scène chez Sibelius. Wallace choisit de refléter l’innocence sans affectation de Mélisande via une forme et une mélodie simplistes. Mélisande n’a guère dépassé l’enfance, et la musique traduit sa dangereuse naïveté, qui a tant captivé les deux frères. La cruauté serait, semble-t-il, parfaitement impossible dans un tel univers de charme mélodique naturel.

«La mort de Mélisande»: succédant à l’innocence de «Fileuse», l’extravagance du chagrin de ce mouvement est des plus parlantes. Ce chagrin est immense, non seulement parce qu’il se produit dans le palais d’un roi et concerne la femme d’un fils de roi morte dans le sillage de son amant, mais aussi parce qu’il n’est pas innocent. Après le meurtre de son propre frère, Golaud est rongé de doutes, ignorant si Pelléas et Mélisande n’étaient pas, après tout, que des enfants, sans prise sur leurs propres actes.

Le contraste avec le traitement ultérieur, voilé, de cette même scène par Debussy et Sibelius est saisissant. Un gong et des tambours funèbres dramatiques ponctuent la phrase descendante passionnée, tirée d’un thème originellement associé à la déclaration d’amour de Pelléas. La section centrale rappelle cet amour, mais le lento e dolente final, annoncé par des trompettes sépulcrales et par le retour des tambours, se fragmente en une profonde misère.

Symphonie de la Création
La Symphonie de la Création fut jouée pour la première fois lors d’un des concerts de Bantock, à Brighton, en 1899, avant d’être reprise à Bournemouth; la composition de cette œuvre avait été entreprise en 1896, lorsque l’histoire d’amour qui unit, toute sa vie durant, Wallace à Ottilie MacLaren, commença à fleurir. Wallace lui écrivait alors presque tous les jours, et son excitation est palpable:

J’ai débuté une Symphonie sur la Création—premier mouvement, le Chaos—, non l’idée bruyante, mais le tréfonds très mystérieux et surnaturel—menaçant—, puis vient «l’Esprit de Dieu sur les eaux», l’évolution du Kosmos surgi du Chaos, puis l’idée divine de l’homme, juste suggéré et incomplètement abouti jusqu’à son apparition au mouvement du sixième jour; fin sur «Que la lumière soit»—trompettes éclatantes très aiguës. Ce mouvement est esquissé, et j’en suis malade de joie!

Wallace considéra la création de Dieu comme une œuvre d’art. À cette époque, Ottilie étudiait avec Rodin, à Paris, et le compositeur, qui s’était départi de l’influence répressive de son père pour passer de la médecine à la musique, exultait dans sa propre liberté d’artiste créatif. Ottilie et lui se sentirent en profonde intimité avec l’idée globale de la création, et Wallace alla même jusqu’à enchâsser les valeurs numérologiques de leurs noms dans la structure de l’œuvre (cf. infra et la «Note sur l’usage de la numérologie»). Il indique clairement les connexions, écrivant à Ottilie, le 31 janvier 1896:

Tu ne réaliseras peut-être pas l’idée musicale, mais traduis-la dans ta propre œuvre, et ce sera clair comme le jour. Lorsque j’y pense, il me semble voir tes doigts patients faire surgir le Kosmos de l’argile du Chaos—et le mystère de ton art conduira à l’appréciation et à la compréhension de tout. Je ne crois pas au bonheur ultime de l’homme qui dit qu’un art suffit à une vie, car même une vie ne suffit pas à connaître un art en profondeur. Mais chacun peut traduire l’œuvre des autres dans sa propre langue, l’absorber jusqu’à ce que les images se fassent symphonies, et les symphonies sculpture.

Cet enthousiasme, cette intimité par rapport à l’acte de création suscitèrent chez Wallace une crainte équivalente face à la vastitude de la conception de Dieu, et une modestie naturelle quant à sa propre place dans l’histoire de la musique:

Et un de ces jours, toute mon œuvre sera oubliée dans celle du roi à venir. Mais un minuscule morceau de moi vivra dans son œuvre, tout comme moi, dans mon fragile cheminement, je me suis pénétré de ceux qui sont partis avant, sentant que si cela n’avait été pour eux, où serais-je!

Wallace était un chrétien profondément réfléchi: sa pièce en vers sur le thème de la Passion, The Divine Surrender, fut publiée l’année qui précéda le commencement de la Symphonie de la Création. Originellement conçue pour un drame musical, elle fut refondue sous une forme parlée. Atteignant à un bel équilibre intellectuel entre les points de vue juif, romain et chrétien, elle est, à l’instar de la musique du compositeur, le fruit d’un esprit passionné et équilibré.

La modestie du Wallace compositeur est d’autant plus désarmante que cette œuvre ne ressemble à aucune autre. H. Orsmond Anderton (qui fit partie du groupe des rebelles susmentionné) décrivit ainsi la Symphonie de la Création:

… une grande œuvre, dans tous les sens du termes. Elle est écrite pour un grand orchestre de festival et montre «la passion pour l’universel» dans l’étendue et dans l’amplitude de ses idées, comme dans leur traitement. La méthode est un reflet du processus d’évolution de la nature, un sujet naissant d’un autre, tous surgissant de l’idée germinative initiale. Il y a quatre mouvements, qui aboutissent à l’homme dans le dernier, lequel recèle des passages d’une nature occulte se référant à la dissolution ultime de la chair et à l’accession de l’homme à un état purement spirituel. Il faut espérer que l’occasion se présentera bientôt d’entendre cette œuvre profondément importante. (Musical Opinion, mai 1920)

Il est agréable de pouvoir adhérer à l’opinion d’Anderton mais aussi d’expliquer certaines significations plus ésotériques de l’œuvre, unifiée non seulement par son matériau thématique, mais par une structure qui fait appel à des valeurs mystiques anciennes attachées aux nombres, exprimées dans des formes codées, simples, en particulier des alphabets hébreu et anglais (cf. «Note»). Cette œuvre n’est donc en rien naturaliste. De fait, Wallace, dans sa propre notice de programme rédigée pour la première (qu’il dirigea), se départit du naturalisme inspiré de la Creation de Haydn, et de l’expressionisme de Richard Strauss:

Appréhendé dans sa signification poétique comme une Hymne liturgique, et non comme un récit d’événements, le premier chapitre de la Genèse présente un thème qui suggère un traitement symphonique. Les ères en lesquelles l’Œuvre de la Création fut divisée ne pouvant être interprétées dans un sens strictement littéral, la musique vise à dépeindre l’émotion que la contemplation du thème, dans son sens poétique et symbolique, peut faire naître.

Adagio — Allegro: «Au commencement, Dieu créa les cieux et la terre. Et la terre était informe, et vide; et les ténèbres couvraient l’abîme.» Ces premiers mots de la Bible inspirent les premières mesures de la symphonie: un passage d’un profond mystère et d’une grande hardiesse orchestrale—les contrebasses divisées et le tuba représentant le «vide et l’espace» (sens correct et littéral du mot grec «chaos», comme Wallace le précise lui-même). Le choix de l’ut dièse mineur comme tonalité principale entend produire une couleur sombre, voilée, dotée d’un potentiel de brillant dans son mi majeur relatif—en particulier à l’époque de Wallace, quand cors et trompettes pouvaient être accordés en mi.

Les stimulants rythmes pointés introductifs de l’Allegro principal pourraient être considérés, à l’instar d’un processus de transformation graduelle du matériau thématique, comme l’énergie latente de la lumière: le thème de la lumière, qui émerge dans le moderato conclusif, est dérivé de celui du vide. Le mouvement anticipe le triomphe de la symphonie toute entière, atteignant à un apogée de puissance cosmique avant de s’achever sur une hymne extatique mais calme, symbole de la «lumière», «illustrée par des accents très doux, comme une influence qui vient d’en haut», pour reprendre les termes de Wallace. Le tout rappelle le premier poème symphonique du compositeur, The Passing of Beatrice, dans lequel une vision de l’amour céleste est réalisée.

Andantino: «Et Dieu fit deux grandes lumières; la plus grande lumière pour présider au jour, et la plus petite lumière pour présider à la nuit; Il fit aussi les étoiles.» L’Andantino débute sur une extraordinaire évocation du mystère paisible de la lumière des étoiles, à l’aide d’une sur-augmentation de la phrase initiale utilisée concomitamment à une exquise couleur orchestrale, doublée d’une pureté minimaliste, presque un siècle avant l’heure. Le largo introduit la première vraie mélodie du mouvement, sur la trace de la belle et majestueuse progression de la lune. Mais la pureté symbolique de la lune est loin d’être sans passion. À nouveau, nous nous rappelons The Passing of Beatrice et l’anticipation du couronnement spirituel, qui conduit logiquement au thème du soleil. Ce thème s’entend contre la texture retravaillée de la section initiale du mouvement, avant d’être suivi par l’ensemble des trois thèmes combinés. Cette trinité de la lumière symbolise également la trinité du Dieu dont elle émane, atteignant à une fanfare triomphante lorsque le soleil s’élève jusqu’à un zénith radieux, pour clore le mouvement.

Allegro: «Et l’Esprit de Dieu se tourna vers la sufface des eaux. Et Dieu dit: Que les eaux qui sont sous le ciel se rassemblent en un seul lieu, et que la terre ferme paraisse.» Le mouvement, une sorte de scherzo, débute sur une figure agitée, fondée sur l’intervalle non résolu du triton, et évocatrice de la turbulence des océans. À mesure qu’il gagne en force, un thème nouveau émerge, joué par les cuivres—«dans le style d’une chanson de marin», comme le consigne Wallace—, auquel succède un thème pastoral, identifié à la terre. Passé un retour de l’agitation initiale, les deux thèmes sont combinés dans une section finale d’une grandeur wagnérienne.

Allegro maestoso: «Alors Dieu créa l’homme à son image, à l’image de Dieu Il le créa; homme et femme Il les créa.» Une magnifique fanfare annonce l’apogée de la symphonie—la création de l’homme au sixième jour. «Attacher une signification verbale à chaque phrase individuelle est aussi impossible qu’analyser l’être humain», déclara Wallace. Mais il décrit le mouvement comme essentiellement triomphal, tout en attirant l’attention sur «les phrases qui peuvent être considérées comme symbolisant la dissolution ultime de la chair qui est comme l’herbe». En tant que médecin et chirurgien, Wallace connaissait relativement bien la dissolution de la chair, mais ce mouvement symbolise essentiellement la capacité créatrice de l’humanité—«homme et femme Il les créa»—et le triomphe est autant le triomphe de l’amour, en particulier celui d’Ottilie et le sien, couple placé comme une sorte d’Adam et Ève dans l’Éden, nouvellement créé, de son finale, sur lequel le thème du soleil du second mouvement s’élève en splendeur.

Le développement habile appliqué par Wallace à son matériau thématique et la tension du tissage de son évolution mériteraient des pages d’analyse (sans parler de l’éclat des couleurs orchestrales, séparément ou en combinaison). Mais il s’agit avant tout d’une création née d’une conviction sans faille, qui fait de cette œuvre un tissu homogène de beauté, d’originalité et de puissance.

Note sur l’usage de la numérologie dans la Symphonie de la Création
Wallace était, de toute évidence, conscient de la signification numérologique de son œuvre. Le fait que les deux derniers mouvements fassent chacun 293 mesures, et que le compositeur ne perdît jamais de vue les numéros de mesures dans sa partition, plaçant des numéros (plutôt que des lettres) de répétition toutes les dix mesures, est en lui-même parlant. Mais un examen détaillé de la signification des numéros de mesure révèle que Wallace utilisa indéniablement un schéma. Pour le comprendre, un simple diagramme des valeurs «26» et «800» de l’alphabet suffit. Numérologiquement, le premier mouvement représente une monade—l’unique cellule de la terre avant que l’Esprit de Dieu ne la fit se diviser. Dans la Genèse, «la terre» a, en hébreu, la valeur numérique 296—le nombre de mesures du mouvement. Wallace écrivit que la fin du mouvement représente l’avènement de la lumière, et son apparition à la mesure 271 fut probablement délibérée, 271 étant l’inverse de 172, nombre correspondant au mot «chaos», et aux ténèbres inhérentes, que la lumière inverse. La mesure 172 est elle-même l’apogée fortissimo de la section centrale du chaos. Les mêmes thèmes se reconstruisent alors, mais leur apothéose intervient, cette fois, à la mesure 222, dans un maestoso voyant une anticipation du thème du dernier mouvement.

Le deuxième mouvement, long de 258 mesures, représente le Dieu triple (258 étant le triple de 86, nombre équivalant à «Élohim», un des noms sacrés de Dieu) et les trois sources de lumière céleste—les étoiles, la lune et le soleil—, sujets du mouvement. Cependant, de même que Wallace décrivait en terme de «chaos» l’argile travaillée par sa femme sculptrice, le «chaos» est toujours présent dans la création, et ce n’est qu’à la mesure 172 que la section, intégrant les trois sources de lumière distinctes, commence. Le fait que 172 soit le double de 86 peut-être considéré comme important dans un contexte chrétien—le Père et le Fils, mais sans l’Esprit Saint, qui est le principe actif de Dieu dans l’acte de création, que ce soit dans l’esprit de Dieu se tournant vers les eaux, ou dans la colombe de l’Esprit Saint imprégant Marie, la mère du Fils de Dieu. Dans une telle interprétation, 172 est le Dieu sans l’Esprit et donc, en un sens, le Chaos.

Les troisième et quatrième mouvements peuvent être pris ensemble. Le troisième mouvement débute sur le nom d’Élohim, dans les 86 mesures initiales de l’Allegro, mais le symbolisme de ces mouvements est aussi personnel. Tout comme les deux premiers mouvements représentent respectivement une monade (l’unicité du «monde») et la Sainte Trinité, plus une trinité de sources de lumière, les deux derniers mouvements symbolisent respectivement la dualité de l’eau et de la terre, de la femme et de l’homme. Cependant, ce n’est pas leur séparation, mais leur réunion, qui est célébrée.

Wallace utilisa la lettre hébraïque shin comme signature à la fin de chaque mouvement de la partition. En 1888, il avait publié les paroles et la musique d’un Carmen Glasguense en l’honneur de l’université de Glasgow, et réalisé le dessin de couverture, hardi, qui représentait un étudiant arborant un mortier, des livres et la lettre hébraïque shin. L’étudiant, portraituré en toge doctorale, est probablement un autoportrait; la lettre shin, qui signifie «chanson» et a la forme d’un W, pour William Wallace, figure l’œil et présente des associations symboliques avec les phrases musicales de six mesures et la structure poétique de six vers. Six, le nombre de jours de la Création, est particulièrement lié à la création de l’homme. Cependant, 6 x 60 font 360, qui est la valeur de la lettre shin dans l’alphabet hébreu «intégral». Wallace appliqua directement cette valeur à sa propre situation. Le nom de jeune fille de son épouse était MacLaren, soit 67 dans l’alphabet «26». Mais, à l’approche de son mariage, elle prit le nom de Wallace, qu’elle utilisa tant personnellement que professionnellement. Or, en ôtant MacLaren à shin (soit 360 moins 67), nous obtenons 293—le nombre de mesures de chacun des deux derniers mouvements de la symphonie.

Le symbolisme n’est pas simplement celui de la perte d’un nom. Ce nom, un nom de jeune fille, symbolise la virginité. Le nouveau nombre représente les deux noms, les deux sexes, chacun cédant à l’autre pour engendrer un nombre symbole de leur union. Dans le même alphabet «26», et par une extraordinaire coïncidence qui frappa manifestement Wallace, les noms «William Wallace» et «Ottilie MacLaren» se montent exactement au même nombre: 293.

Nous n’en avons pas fini avec les coïncidences puisque, dans l’alphabet anglais «800», «William Wallace» équivaut à 1189, et «Ottie MacLaren» à 733. Or, 1189 moins 733 égalent 456, somme d’Adam (46) et Ève (410) dans le même alphabet «800». Il est impensable d’y voir de simples coïncidences, et il ne fait aucun doute que Wallace fut conscient de ces correspondances, et qu’il les utilisa.

Ma profonde gratitude va à la généreuse érudition de David Crookes pour la préparation de cette note.

1 – A – 1
2 – B – 2
3 – C – 3
4 – D – 4
5 – E – 5
6 – F – 6
7 – G – 7
8 – H – 8
9 – I – 9
10 – J – 10
11 – K – 20
12 – L – 30
13 – M – 40
14 – N – 50
15 – O – 60
16 – P – 70
17 – Q – 80
18 – R – 90
19 – S – 100
20 – T – 200
21 – U – 300
22 – V – 400
23 – W – 500
24 – X – 600
25 – Y – 700
26 – Z – 800

John Purser © 1997
Français: Hypérion

Trotz des großen Erfolgs, dessen sich eine frühere Album von Hyperion mit Wallaces sinfonischen Dichtungen erfreute, war die Aufnahme seiner Schöpfungssinfonie ein von der Inspiration getriebener Sprung ins Ungewisse. Anscheinend war das Werk seit fast hundert Jahren von niemandem mehr aufgeführt worden, und dennoch stellte es zum Zeitpunkt der Komposition in der britischen Geschichte der Sinfonie etwas noch nie Dagewesenes dar—sowohl in bezug auf den Umfang als auch die Gewagtheit. Das Prelude to The Eumenides („Präludium zu den Eumeniden“) und die drei Sätze aus der Suite „Pelléas and Mélisande“ sind ebenfalls praktisch unbekannt; dies ist ihre erste Aufnahme.

William Wallace wurde 1860 geboren, und wie Hamish MacCunn (siehe Hyperion CDA66815) war er ein Sohn Greenocks. Er war Schüler am Fettes College, Edinburgh, und studierte schließlich an der Universität Glasgow, wo er 1885 den akademischen Grad des Bakkalaureus der Medizin sowie den Magister der Chirurgie erwarb. Nach einer weiteren Studienzeit in Wien, Paris und Moorfields—dieses Mal war sein Fach die Augenheilkunde—kehrte er zurück, um 1888 mit dem Doktor der Medizin abzuschließen. Es war aber nicht immer eine glückliche Zeit gewesen. Sein Vater James war ein eminenter Chirurg und hatte große Ambitionen für seinen Sohn; als William seine eigenen Wege ging, kam es zu bitteren Unstimmigkeiten. Seine Mutter schrieb ihm kurz nachdem er das Elternhaus im Frühling 1882 verlassen hatte:

Mein lieber Willie, es tat mir in der Seele weh, als Du gestern Abend in solch einem Zustand gegangen bist mit solch grausamen Worten in Deinem und meinem Ohr—ich kann Dir nur sagen, daß Du versuchen sollst, sie zu vergessen … Deine, mein liebster Sohn, zutiefst bekümmerte Mutter.

Die Schwierigkeiten mit seinem Vater waren auch 1885 noch nicht gelöst, und nachdem er 1888 sein Doktorat erlangt hatte, nahm er das Studium der Musik an der Londoner Royal Academy of Music auf; das Ohr hatte also über das Auge gesiegt. Zwei Trimester an der Akademie waren jedoch genug für ihn (was mit seinen 28 Jahren nicht überraschend ist), und er fuhr fortan im Selbststudium fort. Er war einer der sechs Rebellen, zu denen sein jüngerer Zeitgenosse Bantock (ebenfalls Sohn eines in Schottland tätigen Chirurgen) zählte, die den Konservatismus der Musikschulen ihrer Zeit in Frage stellten. Mit Bantock (siehe Hyperion CDS44281/6) veröffentlichte Wallace eine vierteljährliche Zeitschrift mit Musikrezensionen, The New Quarterly Musical Review, eine Veröffentlichung, die er in Bantocks Abwesenheit häufig mit Anderton editierte. In einem Brief bittet Wallace 1904 die Jury des Royal College of Music, „auch den bizarrsten und sogenannten exzentrischen Kompositionen, die eingesandt werden, eine Chance zu geben“; hinsichtlich der Kontroversen beim Festival von Leeds will er „in Richtung der Gewehre marschieren“!

Der Haushalt der Familie Wallace muß faszinierend gewesen sein, denn er heiratete die angesehene Bildhauerin Ottilie Helen MacLaren, Tochter von Lord MacLaren. Ihr widmete Wallace A Suite in the Olden Style („Eine Suite im alten Stil“) für Klavier. Sie war eine Schülerin Rodins und stellte regelmäßig an der Royal Academy aus (doch als sie 1928 hierzu nicht in der Lage war, fertigte William prompt ein mit Waterloo Drum betiteltes Gemälde an, das eine Ecke ihres eigenen Hauses in London darstellte, und reichte es ein, denn er wollte sicherstellen, daß die Familie vertreten war. Das Gemälde wurde angenommen und auch ganz ordnungsgemäß aufgehängt). Ihr Verhältnis war von einer außerordentlich tiefen und dauerhaften Liebe geprägt, die in ihrem rührenden Briefwechsel, der nun in der schottischen Nationalbibliothek aufbewahrt wird, dokumentiert ist.

Im Ersten Weltkrieg arbeitete Wallace mehr oder weniger ununterbrochen für das Ärztekorps des britischen Heers. Er schied 1919 mit dem Dienstgrad eines Hauptmanns aus dem Militärdienst aus. Bei Kriegsende war er 58 Jahre alt, hatte nur drei Wochen Urlaub genommen und in vier Jahren 19000 Krankengeschichten über Patienten verfaßt, von denen er zahlreiche selbst behandelt hatte. Er muß völlig ausgelaugt gewesen sein, doch er wurde dennoch in seinen späteren Jahren Professor für Harmonie und Komposition sowie für die Bibliothek zuständiger Professor an der Royal Academy of Music.

Wallaces wichtigste Werke sind nun auf dieser und der früheren Wallace-Einspielung von Hyperion gut vertreten. Ohne Aufnahme verbleiben nur zwei seiner sechs sinfonischen Dichtungen (von denen eine derzeit verloren ist); zwei Orchestersuiten und eine Orchesterrhapsodie; eine beißend satirische Chorballade, The Massacre of the MacPhersons, die eine absurde Kombination aus Bruchstücken von Wagners „Ring“ und traditionellen schottischen Themen darstellt; und eine Chorsinfonie, Koheleth, die nur darauf wartet, wieder entdeckt zu werden, und möglicherweise unvollendet ist. Wallace veröffentlichte auch mehrere Bücher über Musiktheorie und -geschichte. Diese umfassen weitreichende und herausfordernde Werke, die die Natur und Entwicklung der musikalischen Fähigkeiten der Menschheit analysieren, sowie Studien, die ein gutes Verständnis von Wagner und Liszt vermitteln, deren Einfluß auf seine eigene Musik deutlich ist. Wallace starb 1940.

Stilistisch ist Wallace bei weitem radikaler als Mackenzie oder MacCunn, besonders was seine freiere Strukturentwicklung angeht. Bantock schwelgte in prachtvollerem Lärmen: und unmittelbare symphonische Vorgänger waren, wie Bruckner, entschlossen gewaltiger, oder, wie Liszt und Mahler (Wallaces genauer Zeitgenosse) emotionell demonstrativer. Wallace erzielt statt dessen seine eigene Größe, indem er Leidenschaft und Philosophie vereinte. Sein Stil entspricht der hohen deutschen Romantik, wo bei er nur gelegentlich auf volkstümliche schottische Weisen zurückgreift. Seine chromatischen Harmonien bleiben von der schottischen Folklore unbeeinflußt; seine Melodien sind von den Harmonien angetrieben und nicht anders herum; und seine Themenentwicklung ist zutiefst organisch. In allen diesen Aspekten mit Ausnahme des letzten unterscheidet er sich deutlich von seinem jüngeren Zeitgenossen Carl Nielsen, doch was die Bedeutung angeht, insbesondere in einigen Passagen der Schöpfungssinfonie blickt Wallace das Werk Nielsens (der in den gleichen protestantischen Breiten geboren wurde) und nicht auf die großen österreichischen und deutschen Sinfoniker. Seine Überzeugung ist nicht nur intellektuell und emotionell: sie besitzt eine moralische Triebkraft, die nie didaktisch ist, und, obgleich sie triumphierend ist, liegt in ihrer Schönheit und Pracht kein eitles Gepränge.

Präludium zu den Eumeniden
„It profiteth a man to gain wisdom through trouble.“ So hat Wallace seine Partitur betitelt, wobei er er freundlicherweise das voranstehende Griechische übersetzt hat. Auf deutsch besagt dieser Spruch, daß es dem Menschen von Nutzen ist, durch Schwierigkeiten zu lernen. Es ist die Aufgabe der Furien—den Schwestern des Schicksals—die Schuldigen zu bestrafen: in diesem Fall Orestes für den Mord an seiner Mutter Clytemnestra, die wiederum ihren Gatten, Orestes’ Vater, umgebracht hat. In der darauffolgenden Gerichtsverhandlung ist Apollo Orestes’ Verteidiger, und Athene, die Göttin der Weisheit, hat die ausschlaggebende Stimme. Mit ihrem Urteil der Tötung bei Vorliegen eines Rechtfertigungsgrundes erzürnt sie die Furien, doch sie gewinnt dadurch auf ihre Seite, daß sie ihnen Asyl anbietet, eine neue Rolle und eine gehobene Stellung in Athen und außerdem einen neuen Namen—die „Eumeniden“ oder „Wohltäter“. Das Stück spiegelt die allmähliche Reifung der Justiz in Athen im fünften Jahrhundert vor Christus wider und führt weg von der Unumstößlichkeit der Rache, hinzu auf ein humaneres Modell.

Das Prelude beginnt mit dem Leitmotiv des Schicksals, rasend und unerbittlich. Die Antwort darauf kommt in der Form eines Oboensolos, durchdacht, aber voller Gefühl, das uns mit wachsender Inbrunst zu den weniger rationalen Aspekten der Furien zurückführt. Während dieser musikalische Streit hin- und herschwingt, wird es deutlich, daß die beiden Themen miteinander verwandt sind, wobei das erste im rationaleren Charakter in dem von Athene untergeht. In ihrer Ehre ertönt die abschließende Hymne der Blechbläser, die von einer Variation ihres eigenen Themas begleitet ist.

August Manns dirigierte die Erstaufführung im Londoner Kristallpalast am 21. Oktober 1893.

Suite „Pelléas und Mélisande“
Maeterlinck veröffentlichte sein symbolistisches Drama Pelléas et Mélisande im Jahr 1892. Wallaces Suite wurde unter Leitung des Komponisten im New Brighton Tower am 19. August 1900 uraufgeführt. Es ist damit älter als Debussys unvergleichliche Oper des gleichen Namens (die 1902 fertiggestellt und erstmals inszeniert wurde) und als Sibelius’ Suite (1905). Nur drei der fünf Sätze sind auf dieser CD enthalten—doch die Auswahl (die drei letzten Sätze) ist eine, die Wallace selbst vorgeschlagen hatte. Bei den ausgelassenen Sätzen handelt es sich um „Die verlorene Mélisande“ und „Der Marsch des Königs“.

Die Geschichte ist recht einfach. Pelléas verliebt sich in Mélisande, die junge Ehefrau seines älteren Bruders. Der Bruder, Golaud, Thronerbe von König Arkel, bemerkt dies und tötet ihn; und Mélisande, die ihrem Gatten ein Kind geschenkt hat, stirbt vor Gram. Diese Einfachheit verbirgt jedoch eine tiefe Symbolik, in der die Natur der Unschuld in Frage gestellt wird und in der ihr Mißbrauch unweigerlich zur Tragödie führt.

„Pelléas’ Liebe für Mélisande“: Ob sie nun unschuldig ist oder nicht: es handelt sich hier um eine leidenschaftliche Liebe, der auf der Baßklarinette, gefolgt von Streichern in ansteigenden Sequenzen des Begehrens, volltönend Ausdruck verliehen wird. Die gedämpfte Feinfühligkeit der mittelalterlichen Szene ist ebenfalls spürbar, doch der Schluß des Satzes entspricht der Realität im Theaterstück, in dem Pelléas und Mélisande vorbereitet wurden, sich in dem Wissen, daß ihr Mann sie beobachtet, einander voll hinzugeben.

„Spinnlied“: Dies ist ein kleines Charakterstück, das eine sanfte und leichtere Seite von Wallaces Charakter als Komponist zeigt, ganz besonders im Vergleich zu den dunklen Untertönen in Sibelius’ Interpretation der gleichen Szene. Wallace hat sich entschieden, die unaffektierte Unschuld von Mélisande in simplistischer Form und Melodie darzustellen. Sie ist kaum den Kinderschuhen entwachsen, und die Musik spiegelt ihre gefährliche Naivität wider, die die beiden Brüder so sehr in ihren Bann geschlagen hat. In einer solchen Welt natürlichen melodischen Charmes erscheint Grausamkeit absolut unmöglich.

„Der Tod Mélisandes“: Nach der Unschuld des „Spinnlied“ ist die übermäßige Trauer in diesem Satz umso wirkungsvoller. Eine enorme Trauer, nicht nur, weil sie in einem Königspalast herrscht und für die Gattin eines Königssohnes ist, deren Tod auf den ihres Geliebten gefolgt ist. Der andere Grund ist, daß die Trauer nicht unschuldig ist. Golaud, der seinen eigenen Bruder ermordet hat, wird von Zweifel geplagt, da er nicht weiß, ob Pelléas und Mélisande doch nicht nur Kinder waren, die nicht anders konnten.

Der Kontrast mit Debussys und Sibelius’ späteren, gedämpften Behandlung dieses Stücks ist verblüffend. Dramatische Begräbnistrommeln und Gongs unterbrechen die leidenschaftliche absteigende Phrase, die sich aus einem Thema ableitet, das ursprünglich mit Pelléas’ Liebeserklärung verbunden war. Der mittlere Abschnitt ruft diese Liebe zurück, doch das lento e dolente am Ende, eingeleitet von Begräbnistrompeten und der Rückkehr der Trommeln, zerfällt in gedämpftes Klagen.

Schöpfungssinfonie
Die Schöpfungssinfonie wurde bei einem von Bantocks Konzerten in Brighton 1899 uraufgeführt und danach auch in Bournemouth gespielt; mit dem Komponieren hatte Wallace jedoch schon 1896 begonnen, als sich die ersten Knospen seiner lebenslangen Liebesaffäre mit Ottilie MacLaren zu öffnen begannen. Er schrieb ihr fast täglich, und seine Begeisterung ist ganz offensichtlich:

Ich habe mit einer Sinfonie über die Schöpfung begonnen—erster Satz Chaos—nicht mit der Idee des Lärms, sondern tief, sehr mysteriös und seltsam—düster—dann kommt „der Geist Gottes auf dem Wasser“, die Evolution des Kosmos aus dem Chaos, dann erdenkt Gott den Menschen, nur angedeutet und erst vollkommen, wenn er im Satz des sechsten Tages auftaucht; und am Ende „Es werde Licht“—sehr hohe strahlende Trompeten. Dieser Satz ist eine Skizze, und ich bin außer mir vor Freude!

Wallace betrachtete die Göttliche Schöpfung als Kunstwerk. Ottilie studierte zu dieser Zeit bei Rodin in Paris; und Wallace, der sich vom repressiven Einfluß seines Vaters losgerissen und von der Medizin zur Musik übergewechselt war, genoß seine eigene Freiheit als schaffender Künstler. Er und Ottilie fühlten eine tiefe Vertrautheit mit der ganzen Schöpfung, und Wallace brachte sogar die numerologischen Werte seines eigenen Namen und Ottilies in die Struktur des Werkes ein (siehe unten und die „Hinweise zu Wallaces Verwendung der Numerologie“). Er macht die Verbindungen in seinem Brief an Ottilie vom 31. Januar 1896 deutlich:

Du magst vielleicht die musikalische Idee nicht begreifen, doch übertrage sie auf Deine eigene Arbeit und sie wird so klar wie der helle Tag. Wenn ich daran denke, glaube ich Deine geduldigen Finger zu sehen, die den Kosmos aus dem Ton des Chaos formen—und das Mysterium Deiner Kunst wird dazu führen, daß Du alles wertschätzt und verstehst. Ich glaube nicht, daß ein Mensch, der sagt, eine Kunst sei genug für die Dauer eines Lebens, letztendlich glücklich wird, denn selbst ein Leben ist zu wenig, um eine Kunst gründlich zu kennen, doch jeder kann die Arbeit anderer in seine eigene Sprache übersetzen, sie aufnehmen, bis Bilder als Sinfonien erscheinen und Sinfonien als Skulpturen.

Diese Begeisterung über und Vertrautheit mit dem Akt der Schöpfung erweckte in Wallace eine entsprechende Ehrfurcht vor der Größe von Gottes Vorstellung sowie natürliche Bescheidenheit angesichts seiner eigenen Stellung in der Geschichte der Musik:

Und eines Tages wird meine Arbeit in der des Königs, der da kommt, vergessen. Aber trotzdem wird ein winzigkleines Stück von mir in seiner Arbeit leben, genau wie ich in meinen eigenen schwachen Wegen andere, die da vor mir waren, aufgesaugt habe, und das Gefühl hatte, daß wenn sie nicht gewesen wären, wo wäre ich dann?

Wallace war ein zutiefst gedankenvoller Christ: sein Versspiel zum Thema der Passion, The Divine Surrender („Die göttliche Kapitulation“), wurde ein Jahr, bevor er mit der Arbeit an der Schöpfungssinfonie begann, veröffentlicht. Ursprünglich war es für ein Musikdrama gedacht gewesen, und Wallace hatte es daher in gesprochene Form umgeschrieben. Er erreicht ein feinfühliges intellektuelles Gleichgewicht zwischen jüdischen, römischen und christlichen Standpunkten, und ist, genau wie seine Musik, das Produkt eines leidenschaftlichen und ausgewogenen Geistes.

Als Komponist ist Wallaces Bescheidenheit entwaffnend, denn dies ist ein Werk ohnegleichen. H. Orsmond Anderton (der der oben erwähnten Rebellengruppe angehörte) beschrieb die Schöpfungssinfonie so:

… ein großes Werk in jeder Hinsicht. Es ist für ein großes Orchester ausgelegt und zeigt die Leidenschaft für das Universelle im Umfang und der Breite seiner Ideen wie auch ihrer Behandlung. Die Methode ist eine Reflexion des Evolutionsprozesses der Natur, wobei ein Thema aus dem anderen erwächst und alle von anfänglichen Ideenkeim entspringen. Es hat vier Sätze, die zum „Menschen“ im letzten hinführen, der Passagen okkulter Natur enthält, bevor es zum letztendlichen Zerfall des Fleisches kommt und ein rein spiritueller Zustand erreicht wird. Es ist zu hoffen, daß es bald eine Gelegenheit geben wird, dieses höchst bedeutungsvolle Werk zu hören. (Musical Opinion, Mai 1920)

Es ist erfreulich, Andertons Meinung teilen zu können, und auch einige der obskureren Bedeutungen im Werk zu erklären, denn es ist nicht nur durch sein Themenmaterial geeint, sondern auch durch eine Struktur, die auf alte mystische Werte zugreift, die mit den Nummern verbunden sind und in einfach kodierten Formen des hebräischen und englischen Alphabets im besonderen ausgedrückt werden (siehe „Hinweise“). Dies ist dann kein naturalistisches Werk. In der Tat hat Wallace sich auf seinem eigenen Programmtext für die Erstaufführung (bei der er selbst dirigiert) sich vom inspirationsvollen Naturalismus von Haydns Schöpfung und der Bildhaftigkeit von Richard Strauß distanziert:

In ihrer dichterischen Bedeutung als liturgische Hymne und nicht als Aufzeichnung von Ereignissen betrachtet, stellt das erste Buch Moses ein Thema dar, das eine sinfonische Behandlung suggeriert. Da die Äonen, in die das Schöpfungswerk geteilt wurde, nicht im rein wörtlichen Sinn ausgelegt werden können, zielt die Musik darauf ab, die Emotionen darzustellen, die die Betrachtung des Themas in seiner dichterischen und symbolischen Bedeutung in der Lage ist zu erwecken.

Adagio — Allegro: „Am Anfang schuf Gott Himmel und Erde. Und die Erde war wüst und leer, und es war finster auf der Tiefe.“ Diese Anfangsworte der Bibel sind es, die die Anfangstakte der Sinfonie inspirieren: eine Passage tiefsten Mysteriums und großer orchestralischer Gewagtheit—mit zwei geteilten Bässen und einer Solotuba, die die „Leere und den Raum“ darstellen, die korrekte und wörtliche Bedeutung des griechischen Wortes „Chaos“ wie Wallace es selbst beschreibt. Die Wahl von cis-moll als Haupttonart soll eine dunkle, verschleierte Färbung produzieren, die in sich selbst den potentiellen Glanz ihrer verwandten Tonart E-Dur enthält—ganz besonders, wenn zu Wallaces Zeiten Hörner und Trompeten in E stehen konnten.

Die anspruchsvollen punktierten Rhythmen, die das Haupt-Allegro sowie einen Prozeß allmählicher Transformierung des Themenmaterials einleiteten, könnte man als die latente Energie des Lichtes betrachten: in der Tat ist das Lichtthema, das im abschließenden moderato an den Tag tritt, vom Thema der Leere abgeleitet. Der Satz antizipiert den Triumph der gesamten Sinfonie und erreicht einen Höhepunkt der kosmischen Energie, bevor sie mit einer ekstatischen doch ruhigen Hymne endet, die—in Wallaces eigenen Worten—das „Licht“ darstellt, „das von sehr sanften Strahlen als ein von oben kommender Einfluß veranschaulicht wird“. Es erinnert an seine erste Tondichtung, The Passing of Beatrice („Das Hinscheiden der Beatrice“), in der die Vision einer himmlischen Liebe realisiert wird.

Andantino: „Und Gott machte zwei große Lichter: ein großes Licht, das den Tag regiere, und ein kleines Licht, das die Nacht regiere, dazu auch die Sterne.“ Das Andantino beginnt mit einer außerordentlichen Heraufbeschwörung des ausgewogenen Mysteriums des Sternenlichts, indem es eine simultane doppelte Vergrößerung der Eröffnungsphrase mit exquisiter Orchesteruntermalung und minimalistischer Reinheit verwendet, beinahe ein Jahrhundert vor seiner Zeit. Das largo bringt die erste echte Melodie des Satzes, die den wunderschönen und würdevollen Gang des Mondes verfolgt. Doch die symbolische Reinheit des Mondes ist keinesfalls ohne Leidenschaft. Wir werden wiederum an The Passing of Beatrice erinnert, und die Erwartung des spirituellen Vollzugs, der logisch zum schreitenden Thema der Sonne führt. Dies hört man vor dem Hintergrund der umgearbeiteten Struktur des Eingangsabschnitts des Satzes, gefolgt von einer Kombination aus allen drei Themen. Diese Dreieinigkeit des Lichtes ist auch symbolisch für die Dreieinigkeit des Gottes, aus dem sie entspringt, und sich in Richtung einer triumphierenden Fanfare bewegt, während die Sonne zu einem strahlenden Zenith aufsteigt, um den Satz zum Abschluß zu bringen.

Allegro: „Und der Geist Gottes schwebte auf dem Wasser. Und Gott sprach: Es sammle sich das Wasser unter dem Himmel an besondere Orte, daß man das Trockene sehe.“ Bei diesem Satz handelt es sich um eine Art Scherzo, das mit einer ruhelosen Figur beginnt, die auf dem ungelösten Intervall der übermäßigen Quart basiert und die Ruhelosigkeit der Ozeane andeutet. Mit wachsendem Momento kommt von den Blechbläsern ein neue Thema—„im Charakter eines Seeliedes“, wie Wallace es ausdrückt—und ist gefolgt von einem mit der Erde identifizierten Thema. Nach einer Rückkehr der Ruhelosigkeit am Anfang werden die beiden Themen in einem abschließenden Abschnitt Wagnerischer Größe kombiniert.

Allegro maestoso: „Und Gott schuf den Menschen zu seinem Bilde, zum Bilde Gottes schuf er ihn; und schuf sie als Mann und Weib.“ Eine prachtvolle Fanfare kündigt die Kulmination der Sinfonie an—die Schöpfung des Menschen am sechsten Tag. „Jeder einzelnen Phrase eine verbale Bedeutung zu geben, ist ebenso unmöglich wie die Aufgabe, das menschliche Wesen zu analysieren“, erklärte Wallace. Doch er beschreibt den Satz als hauptsächlich triumphal, obgleich er Aufmerksamkeit auf „Phrasen“ lenkt, „die als Symbolisierung des letztendlichen Zerfall des Fleisches, die wie Gras ist, betrachtet werden können“. Als Arzt und Chirurg war Wallace nur allzu gut vertraut mit dem Zerfall des Fleisches, doch dieser Satz ist in erster Linie symbolisch für das Schöpfungspotential der Menschheit—„und schuf sie als Mann und Weib“—und der Triumph ist ebenso der Triumph der Liebe und, ganz besonders, seiner Liebe zwischen ihm selbst und Ottilie, wobei er sich und sie als eine Art Adam und Eva im neu geschaffenen Eden seines Finales plaziert, woraufhin das Sonnenthema des zweiten Satzes in Pracht aufgeht.

Wallaces geschickte Entwicklung des Themenmaterials und das straffe Gewebe seiner Entwicklung (ganz zu schweigen von der Lebhaftigkeit der Orchesterfarben, sowohl einzeln als auch in Kombination) würden seitenlange Analysen verdienen. Aber vor allem ist es selbst eine Schöpfung, das Ergebnis einer entschlossenen Überzeugung, die dieses Werk zu einem nahtlosen Gewebe der Schönheit, Originalität und Stärke macht.

Hinweise zu Wallaces Verwendung der Numerologie in der Schöpfungssinfonie
Daß sich Wallace der numerologischen Bedeutung des Werks bewußt war, ist klar. Die Tatsache, daß die beiden letzten Sätze jeweils 293 Takte lang sind, und daß er die Taktzahlen in seiner Partitur festhielt, indem er Probenziffern (anstelle von Buchstaben) in Abständen von zehn Takten plazierte, sagt an sich schon viel aus. Doch wenn wir die Bedeutung der Taktnummern genau untersuchen, kann einem die Verwendung eines Planes nicht mehr entgehen. Um diesen zu verstehen ist eine einfache Aufstellung der „26“- und „800“-Werte des Alphabets erforderlich. Numerologisch stellt der erste Satz eine Monade dar—die einzige Zelle der Erde, bevor der Geist Gottes ihre Teilung veranlaßte. Das hebräische Wort für „Erde“ in der Schöpfungsgeschichte hat einen numerischen Wert von 296—die Anzahl der Takte im Satz. Wallace schrieb, daß das Ende des Satzes den Beginn des Lichtes darstellte, und es ist wahrscheinlich, daß sein Auftreten bei Takt 271 absichtlich ist, denn 271 ist die Umkehrung von 172, der Zahl für „Chaos“ und die inhärente Dunkelheit, die das Licht umkehrt. Takt 172 selbst ist der Fortissimo-Höhepunkt des mittleren Chaos-Abschnittes. Die gleichen Themen steigern sich noch einmal, doch dieses Mal ist der Höhepunkt bei Takt 222 in einem maestoso, in dem das Thema des letzten Satzes antizipiert wird.

Der zweite Satz ist 258 Takte lang. Es stellt den dreieinigen Gott dar, denn es ist 86 x 3, und 86 ist die Zahl für „Elohim“—einen der heiligen Namen Gottes. Er stellt auch die drei Quellen himmlischen Lichtes dar—Sterne, Mond und Sonne—die der Gegenstand des Satzes sind. Wie jedoch Wallace den Ton beschreibt, den seine Gattin, die Bildhauerin, bearbeitet, als „Chaos“, so ist das „Chaos“ immer noch in der Schöpfung vorhanden, und erst bei Takt 172 beginnt der letzte Abschnitte, der die drei separaten Lichtquellen integriert. Daß 172 zweimal 86 ist kann man in einem christlichen Kontext als bedeutungsvoll einstufen—Vater und Sohn, jedoch ohne den heiligen Geist, der bei der Schöpfung der aktive Teil des dreieinigen Gottes ist, sei es im Geist Gottes, der sich über das Wasser bewegt oder die Taube des Heiligen Geistes, die Maria, die Mutter des Sohnes Gottes, schwängerte. In einer derartigen Interpretation ist 172 der dreieinige Gott ohne den Geist und daher gewissermaßen Chaos.

Den dritten und den vierten Satz kann man zusammen betrachten. Der dritte beginnt mit dem Namen Elohim in den ersten 86 Takten des Allegro, doch der Symbolismus dieser Sätze ist auch persönlich. Ebenso wie der erste Satz eine Monade darstellt (die Singularität der „Welt“), und der zweite die Heilige Dreifaltigkeit darstellt und eine Dreieinigkeit der Lichtquellen, stellen die letzten beiden Sätze jeweils die Dualität von Wasser und Erde und von Mann und Frau dar. Es ist jedoch nicht ihre Eigenständigkeit, sondern ihr Zusammenkommen, das hier gefeiert wird.

Wallace verwendete den hebräischen Buchstaben Schin als Signatur am Ende jeden Satzes der Partitur. 1888 hatte er den Text und die Noten einer Carmen Glasguense zu Ehren der Universität Glasgow veröffentlicht, wobei die kühne Einbandgestaltung mit einem Studenten mit Doktorhut, Büchern und dem symbolischen hebräischen Buchstaben Schin von ihm selbst stammt. Beim Studenten in Doktorrobe handelt es sich wahrscheinlich um ein Selbstportrait, wobei der hebräische Buchstabe Schin „song“ („Lied“) bedeutet und auch wie ein W für William Wallace aussieht. Außerdem stellt es das Auge dar und hat symbolische Assoziationen mit den sechstaktigen Phrasen der Musik und der sechszeiligen Struktur der Gedichte. Sechs Tage dauerte die Schöpfung, und die Zahl sechs wird insbesondere mit der Schöpfung des Menschen verbunden. 6 x 60 ist jedoch 360, und dies ist der Wert des Buchstaben Schin im hebräischen Alphabet. Wallace wandte diesen Wert direkt auf seine eigene Situation an. Der Mädchenname seiner Frau war MacLaren, das einen Wert von 67 im „26“-Alphabet hat. Doch mit ihrer bevorstehenden Heirat würde sie ihren Namen auf Wallace ändern und ihn sowohl beruflich als auch privat führen. Wenn man MacLaren entfernt (indem man 67 von 360 abzieht), ist das Ergebnis 293, die Anzahl der Takte in jedem der beiden Sätze der Sinfonie.

Der Symbolismus besteht nicht im Verlust eines Namens. Der Name ist ein Mädchenname; er symbolisiert Jungfräulichkeit. Die neue Zahl verkörpert die beiden Namen, die beiden Geschlechter, die einander nachgeben, um eine Zahl zu produzieren, die ihre Vereinigung symbolisiert. Im gleichen „26“-Alphabet ergeben durch einen außerordentlichen Zufall, den Wallace ganz offensichtlich bemerkte, die Namen „William Wallace“ und „Ottilie MacLaren“ selbst die gleiche Zahl—293.

Und es kommen noch mehr Zufälle, den im englischen „800“-Alphabet ergibt William Wallace 1.189 und Ottilie MacLaren 733. Wenn man die Werte voneinander abzieht ist das Ergebnis 456, und diese Zahl wiederum ist die Summe von Adam (46) und Eva (410) im gleichen „800“-Alphabet. Es ist keine Frage, daß dies Zufälle sind, doch ebenso herrscht kein Zweifel, daß sich Wallace ihrer bewußt war und sie nutzte.

Bei der Erstellung dieses Textes bin ich David Crookes zutiefst verbunden, der mit so großzügig mit seinem Wissen geholfen hat.

1 – A – 1
2 – B – 2
3 – C – 3
4 – D – 4
5 – E – 5
6 – F – 6
7 – G – 7
8 – H – 8
9 – I – 9
10 – J – 10
11 – K – 20
12 – L – 30
13 – M – 40
14 – N – 50
15 – O – 60
16 – P – 70
17 – Q – 80
18 – R – 90
19 – S – 100
20 – T – 200
21 – U – 300
22 – V – 400
23 – W – 500
24 – X – 600
25 – Y – 700
26 – Z – 800

John Purser © 1997
Deutsch: Anke Vogelhuber

Other albums in this series

Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.