Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Cipriano de Rore (c1515/16-1565)

Missa Doulce mémoire & Missa a note negre

The Brabant Ensemble, Stephen Rice (conductor)
Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
CD-Quality:
Studio Master:
CD-Quality:
Studio Master:
 
 
Recording details: August 2012
The Church of St Michael and All Angels, Summertown, Oxford, United Kingdom
Produced by Antony Pitts
Engineered by Phil Rowlands
Release date: August 2013
Total duration: 74 minutes 28 seconds

Cover artwork: La Vie Seigneuriale: Scene Galante (c1500).
Musée national du Moyen Âge et des Thermes de Cluny, Paris / Giraudon / Bridgeman Art Library, London
 
Missa Doulce mémoire  [27'42]
1
Kyrie  [3'32]
2
Gloria  [4'47]
3
Credo  [8'22]
4
Sanctus and Benedictus  [5'18]
5
Agnus Dei  [5'43]
6
O altitudo divitiarum  [7'09]
7
Fratres: Scitote  [5'58]
8
Illuxit nunc sacra dies  [2'25]
Missa a note negre  [31'14]
9
Kyrie  [4'10]
10
Gloria  [5'36]
11
Credo  [8'54]
12
Sanctus and Benedictus  [5'47]
13
Agnus Dei  [6'47]

The Brabant Ensemble continue their investigation into unknown jewels of the Low Countries Renaissance, researched by their director Stephen Rice and recorded with equal amounts of passion and erudition by the young singers of the group.

Cipriano de Rore was and is principally known as a madrigal composer, and, as Stephen Rice writes, ‘blended the contrapuntal complexity of Low Countries polyphonic style with Italian poetic texts to create a newly expressive vernacular genre’. This recording represents something of a new departure in presenting some of the least well-known aspects of the output of a composer who is justly famous in other fields.

The album contains two Mass settings based on French chansons, Missa a note negre on a composition by Rore himself, and Missa Doulce mémoire, which takes one of the sixteenth century’s greatest hits, by Pierre Regnault dit Sandrin (c1490–after 1560) as its inspiration. Also included are three motets. Fratres: Scitote is apparently a unique instance of composition to its text: St Paul here tells the story of the Last Supper, in which Jesus takes bread, blesses and distributes it, and thereby institutes the ritual of Holy Communion.

Reviews

'Cipriano de Rore is best known today as one of the finest exponents of the madrigal but his sacred output deserves to be better known … Rore's contrapuntal writing, though considerably intricate at times, has a lucidity that the Brabant Ensemble's light sound emphasises' (Gramophone)

'A splendid selection of sacred works … The Brabant Ensemble is very experienced in this type of repertory, and achieves some magical effects in the Doulce mémoire Mass … of the motets O altitudo divitiarum is a truly outstanding and moving work. It is performed with delicacy and sensitivity to phrasing' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Rore's mellifluous use of polyphony, fluently articulated here by The Brabant Ensemble, fuels textures that are ear-catchingly active as well as expressive … a programme that strays appealingly off the Renaissance's beaten track' (The Daily Telegraph)

'It's the three motets between the Masses, two of them contemplative settings of words by St Paul, the third a celebration of the nativity, that make the bigger impression, and show off both the Brabant's care with the weighting of every word and the perfect balance they achieve between the voice parts' (The Guardian)

'The two-voices-per-part approach of The Brabant Ensemble is an excellent solution and, as usual, delivers ravishing results. The singing is lithe, pure, beautifully focused and, under Rice's expert direction, perfectly responsive to every musical inflection … another recording to treasure' (International Record Review)

'De Rore's is music of great self-confidence, conviction and beauty. The lines are varied yet express a concentration that makes for compelling listening. The harmonies are clear but at the same time embellish the composer's highly original ideas. The adherence of the melodies to the spirit of the texts is remarkable. It informs our listening with a fresh and binding integrity. Stephen Rice … has established a fine momentum in bringing these composers to our attention with the aptly-named Brabant Ensemble. Their singing is remarkably sensitive to the crystalline substance of the music of this era. Yet it is the substance, and not the veneer, that they address with every new release. There have been almost a dozen so far. The singers' tempi are gentle and finely-tuned though never sluggish. There is also a real sense that the dozen or so singers of the Ensemble, which was founded in 1998 and has recorded for Hyperion since 2006, are not recreating the music; still less reluctantly infusing it with new life. They are inhabiting it and performing something vibrant and robust. The Brabant Ensemble is also a true ensemble: the singers blend very well in all ways' (MusicWeb International)

'While there’s an austere beauty about the composer’s counterpoint, his treatment of the venerable Mass text is shot through with colourful contrasts of vocal texture, strategic silences and dramatic changes of mood' (Sinfini.com)

Other recommended albums

Rore: Missa Praeter rerum seriem
CDGIM029Please, someone, buy me …
Brahms: Symphonies Nos 1 & 3
Studio Master: SIGCD250for the price of 1 — Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Bruckner: Symphony No 4
Studio Master: LSO0716Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Szymanowski: Symphonies Nos 1 & 2
Studio Master: LSO0731Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Tchaikovsky: Symphony No 6
Studio Master: SIGCD253Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Weber: Der Freischütz
Studio Master: LSO0726Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Cipriano de Rore (1515/16–1565) is among the great names of the history of the madrigal, the secular genre that came to dominate Italian musical culture in the second half of the sixteenth century. Like other pioneers of the form, he was not Italian but from the Low Countries, being born in Ronse (French: Renaix), on the Flemish–French language border in what is now Belgium. Alongside older Northerners such as Philippe Verdelot (c1480/85–?1530/32) and Adrian Willaert (c1490–1562), Rore blended the contrapuntal complexity of Low Countries polyphonic style with Italian poetic texts to create a newly expressive vernacular genre. As the century progressed, and substantially as a result of Rore’s own innovations, madrigals became increasingly expressive of the poetry they set, and eventually ceased to prioritize counterpoint, declaiming the text in clearer, more homophonic textures, and eventually monodically.

A disquisition on the history of the madrigal may seem an odd way to begin a note accompanying a recording of sacred music: but in the case of Rore, it is unavoidable for two reasons. The first is that his fame rests disproportionately on his achievements in the secular sphere, principally in madrigal composition, but also chansons and a substantial body of secular Latin-texted works, reflecting the increased interest in Classical antiquity and its lyric forms current in mid-sixteenth century Italy. This recording therefore represents something of a new departure in presenting some of the least well-known aspects of the output of a composer who is justly famous in other fields.

The second reason for focusing on madrigalian composition is the extent to which its practices began to percolate into the sacred sphere during Rore’s lifetime, and in this regard also his impact on these developments was significant. If one considers Rore’s style in juxtaposition with the music of his direct contemporary Jacobus Clemens non Papa (c1510/15–1555/6), the difference is immediately apparent, most obviously in terms of texture. Though both composers favoured writing for five voices, the overlapping and constantly shifting voice combinations of Clemens stand in sharp distinction to Rore’s clear, often quasi-homophonic declamation of the text.

Rore’s entire musical career was made in Italy. It is possible that he was there very early in life, perhaps in the retinue of Margaret of Parma, the illegitimate daughter of the Emperor Charles V, but the first documentary evidence is from Brescia in 1542. The extent and variety of dedications to Italian noblemen among his works of the 1540s suggest a concerted effort to find gainful employment at a court; nearly half of his known compositions date from this early, freelance, stage.

By 1546 Rore had found a position as maestro di cappella to Duke Ercole II d’Este of Ferrara (grandson of Ercole I, around whose name Josquin Des Prez’s famous Missa Hercules Dux Ferrarie was composed). He was to remain at Ferrara for twelve productive years, composing among many other works a Missa Hercules Dux Ferrarie of his own, based on a repeating ostinato motif. He left the service of the Este in 1558, at first temporarily in order to travel to his native Flanders, but in the event permanently, since Ercole’s death the next year resulted in the hiring of Francesco dalla Viola in Rore’s stead. His next, and last, position was at the Farnese court in Parma, where he died in 1565.

Both of the Mass settings recorded here are based on French chansons: Missa a note negre on a composition by Rore himself, whereas Missa Doulce mémoire takes one of the sixteenth century’s greatest hits, by Pierre Regnault dit Sandrin (c1490–after 1560) as its inspiration. The chanson Doulce mémoire was published in 1537 or ’38 by the Lyons printer Jacques Moderne. Its subject matter, like so many of its genre, is lost love:

Doulce mémoire en plaisir consommée,
O siècle heureux qui cause tel sçavoir.
La fermeté de nous deux tant aymée
Qui à nos maux a su si bien pourvoir.
Or maintenant a perdu son pouvoir
Rompant le but de ma seulle espérance,
Servant d’exemple à tous piteux a voir.
Fini le bien, le mal soudain commence.
Sweet memory consummated in joy,
O happy time of such understanding;
The loving steadfastness of our [united] love,
Which knew so well how to attend our ills.
But now alas has lost its [former] strength
Sev’ring the thread of my [one] only hope.
A sad example all afflicted see,
Cease therefore joy, for sudden evil comes.
translated by Frank Dobbins, from ‘“Doulce mémoire”: A Study of the Parody Chanson’, Proceedings of the Royal Musical Association 96 (1969–70), pp. 85–101

The opening melodic motif, tracing a descending diminished fourth, was one of the most recognizable themes of the century. Necessarily it pervades Rore’s Mass setting, yet its fame allows considerable freedom in adapting Sandrin’s music without the sense of the chanson being lost. The chanson is written in the Parisian manner, with a far more chordal than imitative texture, and Rore’s approach to Mass composition frequently emphasizes the text in homophonic style, rendering the two quite similar in style at times. The Mass setting however is in five voices for the most part, compared with the chanson’s four: as is common at this time, certain sections are reduced in scoring, though Rore is more sparing in this regard than many of his contemporaries. The middle section of the Credo (‘Et ascendit … sedet ad dexteram Patris’) is set for four voices, resting one of the tenor parts, and the Benedictus is a trio for cantus, altus, and tenor. The Agnus Dei is notated in two sections, of which the second (beginning at 1'30") adds a baritone part to make a six-voice texture: in fact the three text sections of this movement are divided in such a way that the six-voice section enunciates both the second and third sets of words, with an audible caesura between the two (3'46"). As so often in the sixteenth century, the Agnus Dei brings out the best in the composer, but other movements of the Mass are also noteworthy for the text-driven expressiveness of Rore’s setting, for instance the Sanctus, where the exemplary text declamation of the opening section builds considerable rhetorical power; and the second Kyrie and ‘Et incarnatus’ of the Credo, both derived from the final couplet of Sandrin’s chanson.

The motets O altitudo divitiarum and Fratres: Scitote both set words of St Paul, of a contemplative nature. The first is a meditation on the divinity and wisdom of God, which humans cannot fathom. The high imitative style of the Low Countries seems appropriate for such an elevated topic, with slow-moving suspensions and passing notes illustrating the difficulty with which our minds strive to comprehend the magnificence of the Almighty. Towards the end of the piece, the full texture is mustered for a concerted statement ‘For of him and through him …’ but counterpoint is thereafter reasserted until the final Amen. For once Rore’s technique is used in the service of a meditative rather than an exegetical response to the text.

Unlike O altitudo divitiarum, which attracted settings from over a dozen of Rore’s contemporaries, of whom Orlande de Lassus (1530/2–1594) is easily the best known, Fratres: Scitote is apparently a unique instance of composition to its text. St Paul here tells the story of the Last Supper, in which Jesus takes bread, blesses and distributes it, and thereby institutes the ritual of Holy Communion. Spoken or sung during every celebration of the Mass, these words were (and remain) known to all Christians as among the most sacred: it is possible that this very centrality to the Mass liturgy accounts for the lack of parallel settings of this text. These were words uttered by the celebrating priest, rather than being delegated to singers; Rore’s motet would therefore have been more suitable for private devotional performance than as an appendage to the liturgy. Whatever the reason for the text’s comparative neglect by composers, this setting is one of the finest motets of the entire century. Rore begins with a forthright declamation of the word ‘Brothers’, which is demarcated as a separate introductory section; the texture is then built up from the bass, with echoes in the doubled upper voice, before a homophonic treatment of the Holy Name of Jesus. The following narrative of the blessing of bread is treated in an imitative style that is somewhat archaic in pairing upper and lower voices one after another; a sonorous descending phrase sets the words ‘Take and eat’, before the central ‘this is my body’ is set off entirely from the surrounding texture in block chords. These are notated in triple time, using the technique of coloration to separate this section on the page, as well as to create the effect of a series of fermatas, yet without the underlying tactus being suspended. The assertion of the Real Presence in communion is thus treated as an appropriately divine mystery in musical terms. The final section reverts to duple time to round off the motet with a repeated statement of the phrase ‘do this in remembrance of me’.

Illuxit nunc sacra dies is a more straightforward and much shorter piece in celebration of the Nativity. Its vigorous rhythms, use of imitation in thirds and close stretto entries all contribute to the sense of rejoicing, which a short section of triple time near the end underlines.

The second Mass setting recorded here bears the title Missa a note negre, reflecting its relationship with the subgenre of madrigals that became popular around the mid-century, in which shorter note values—hence ‘black noteheads’—were used substantially. This Mass is thus even more madrigalian in its declamation than Missa Doulce mémoire. As noted above, it is based on another chanson, set by Rore himself:

Tout ce qu’on peut en elle voir
N’est que douceur et amitié,
Beauté, bonté, et un vouloir
Tout plein d’amoureuse pitié.
Mais je n’en suis édifié
De rien mieux, car le regard d’elle
Me met en une peine telle
Que ne la puis dire à moitié.
Si ne la vois, je me lamente,
Quand je la vois, je me tourmente:
Le doux n’est jamais sans l’amer,
Voilà que c’est de trop d’aymer.
All that one can see in her
Is nothing but sweetness and friendship,
Beauty, goodness, and a spirit
Full of loving empathy.
But by this I am not inspired to
Better things, for looking at her
Gives me such pain
That I cannot tell the half of it.
If I do not see her, I lament,
When I see her, I am tormented:
There is no sweetness without bitterness,
So it is to love too much.

The chanson mixes Parisian and Low Countries style, beginning with homophonic treatment of the first eight lines, followed by an imitative section before returning to direct declamation for the lapidary final couplet. The Mass setting is reasonably conventional in its use of the opening phrase to begin the Kyrie and Gloria, though in later movements the rising third motif migrates to inner voices: the altus in the Credo and Sanctus, and the second tenor in the Agnus Dei. Another notable borrowing from the model is the low phrase which is found towards the end of several movements, where the cantus reaches low D (sounding middle C at the present performing pitch), derived from the phrase ‘Voilà que c’est’ in the chanson’s final line. As in Missa Doulce mémoire, a central section of the Credo is reduced to four voices, and the Benedictus is a trio: the second Agnus is similarly expanded to six voices, though here the added voice is a second cantus, lightening the texture but also adding a weight of sound that builds an impressive rhetorical plea before the Mass subsides into a peaceful triple-time ‘dona nobis pacem’.

Stephen Rice © 2013

Cipriano de Rore (1515/16–1565) fut l’un des grands noms de l’histoire du madrigal, genre profane qui, dans la seconde moitié du XVIe siècle, finit par dominer la culture musicale italienne. Comme d’autres pionniers du madrigal, il n’était pas italien mais naquit aux Pays-Bas, à Renaix, à la frontière linguistique entre le flamand et le français, dans l’actuelle Belgique. À l’instar d’aînés venus du Nord comme Philippe Verdelot (ca1480/5–?1530/2) et Adrian Willaert (ca1490–1562), il amalgama complexité contrapuntique du style polyphonique des Pays-Bas et textes poétiques italiens pour créer un genre indigène d’une expressivité nouvelle. Au fil du siècle, et essentiellement grâce à ses innovations, le madrigal exprima de plus en plus la poésie mise en musique, jusqu’à cesser de donner le primat au contrepoint pour déclamer le texte en des textures plus limpides, plus homophones et, finalement, de façon monodique.

Il peut sembler curieux de démarrer une notice accompagnant un enregistrement de musique sacrée par une petite histoire du madrigal mais, dans le cas de Rore, c’est inévitable, et ce pour deux raisons. Tout d’abord, sa renommée repose de manière disproportionnée sur ses réalisations profanes—sur ses madrigaux, surtout, mais aussi sur ses chansons et sur un substantiel corpus d’œuvres profanes en latin, reflet du vif intérêt que l’Italie des années 1550 portait à l’antiquité classique et à ses formes lyriques. Cet enregistrement constitue donc une nouvelle manière de présenter certaines des facettes les moins connues du catalogue d’un compositeur par ailleurs justement célèbre.

Seconde raison de s’intéresser aux madrigaux: l’ampleur avec laquelle la pratique de ce genre s’instilla dans la sphère sacrée du vivant de Rore, et en grande partie sous son influence. Juxtaposé à la musique de son contemporain direct, Jacobus Clemens non Papa (ca1510/15–1555/6), le style de Rore affiche d’emblée sa différence, de texture d’abord: même si tous deux privilégièrent l’écriture à cinq voix, le chevauchement et les combinaisons vocales sans cesse changeantes de Clemens se distinguent bien de la déclamation limpide, souvent quasi homophonique, de Rore.

Toute sa carrière musicale, Rore la fit en Italie, où il arriva peut-être très tôt, possiblement dans la suite de Marguerite de Parme, la fille illégitime de l’empereur Charles Quint, même si la première trace documentaire dont nous disposons vient de Brescia, en 1542. Ses pièces des années 1540 fourmillent de dédicaces en tout genre à des nobles italiens, signe d’un effort concerté pour décrocher un emploi rémunéré à la cour; près de la moitié de toutes les œuvres que nous lui connaissons date de ces débuts indépendants.

En 1546, Rore était devenu maestro di cappella du duc Ercole II d’Este de Ferrare (petit-fils d’Ercole Ier, autour du nom duquel Josquin Des Prez composa son illustre Missa Hercules Dux Ferrarie). En 1558, après douze années fructueuses durant lesquelles il rédigea, entre autres nombreuses œuvres, sa propre Missa Hercules Dux Ferrarie, fondée sur un motif en ostinato répété, il quitta le service des d’Este, d’abord provisoirement, pour voyager dans ses Flandres natales, puis définitivement, la mort d’Ercole, l’année suivante, s’étant traduite par l’engagement, à sa place, de Francesco dalla Viola. Son poste suivant, le dernier, fut à la cour des Farnèse, à Parme, où il mourut en 1565.

Les deux messes enregistrées ici se fondent sur des chansons françaises, la Missa a note negre s’appuyant sur une composition personnelle de Rore tandis que la Missa Doulce mémoire s’inspire d’un des plus grands succès du XVIe siècle, de Pierre Regnault, dit Sandrin (ca1490–ap. 1560). La chanson Doulce mémoire fut publiée en 1537 ou 1538 par l’imprimeur lyonnais Jacques Moderne. Son thème est, comme si souvent dans ce genre, l’amour perdu:

Doulce mémoire en plaisir consommée,
O siècle heureux qui cause tel sçavoir.
La fermeté de nous deux tant aymée
Qui à nos maux a su si bien pourvoir.
Or maintenant a perdu son pouvoir
Rompant le but de ma seulle espérance,
Servant d’exemple à tous piteux a voir.
Fini le bien, le mal soudain commence.

Le motif mélodique inaugural, dessinant une quarte diminuée descendante, comptait parmi les thèmes les plus reconnaissables du XVIe siècle. Il imprègne forcément la messe de Rore mais sa célébrité autorise aussi toute licence dans l’adaptation de la musique de Sandrin, sans que le sens de la chanson soit perdu. Celle-ci est écrite à la manière parisienne, avec une texture beaucoup plus en accords qu’imitative, et comme Rore aborde sa messe en accusant souvent le texte dans un style homophonique, les deux composantes sont parfois stylistiquement très similaires. Mais la messe est essentiellement à cinq voix, contre quatre pour la chanson: comme souvent à cette époque, certaines sections sont à voix réduites, encore que Rore soit, à cet égard, plus modéré que nombre de ses contemporains. La section centrale du Credo («Et ascendit … sedet ad dexteram Patris») est à quatre voix (l’une des parties de tenor est au repos), tandis que le Benedictus est un trio pour cantus, altus et tenor. L’Agnus Dei est noté en deux sections, la seconde (démarrant à 1'30") ajoutant une partie de baryton pour obtenir une texture à six voix: en réalité, les trois sections textuelles de ce mouvement sont divisées de manière à ce que la section à six voix énonce les deuxième et troisième séries de mots avec, entre elles, une césure audible (3'46"). Comme très souvent au XVIe siècle, c’est dans l’Agnus Dei que le compositeur se montre à son meilleur, même si les autres mouvements valent aussi par leur expressivité musicale, déterminée par le texte: ainsi le Sanctus, où l’exemplaire déclamation de la section inaugurale atteint à une considérable puissance stylée; ainsi le second Kyrie et l’«Et incarnatus» du Credo, dérivés du dernier couplet de la chanson de Sandrin.

Les motets O altitudo divitiarum et Fratres: Scitote mettent en musique des paroles de saint Paul, d’une nature contemplative. Le premier est une méditation sur la divinité et la sagesse de Dieu, impénétrables aux humains. Le noble style imitatif des Pays-Bas semble en adéquation avec un sujet aussi élevé, de lentes suspensions et des notes de passage illustrant la peine avec laquelle nos esprits s’efforcent de comprendre la magnificence du Tout-Puissant. Vers la fin de la pièce, la texture complète est convoquée pour une énonciation concertée de «Car de lui et à travers lui …» mais le contrepoint est ensuite réaffirmé jusqu’à l’Amen final. Pour une fois, la technique de Rore sert une réaction au texte méditative et non exégétique.

Contrairement à O altitudo divitiarum, mis en musique par au moins douze contemporains de Rore (la version de Roland de Lassus (1530/2–1594) est, de loin, la plus connue), Fratres: Scitote est apparemment unique. Saint Paul y relate la Cène, où Jésus prend le pain, le bénit et le distribue, instituant par là même le rituel de la sainte communion. Prononcés ou chantés durant chaque célébration de la messe, ces mots étaient (et demeurent) pour tout chrétien parmi les plus sacrés—un caractère très central dans la liturgie de la messe qui explique peut-être l’unicité de cette œuvre. Ces paroles étaient prononcées par le célébrant et n’étaient pas déléguées aux chanteurs; le motet de Rore n’était donc pas tant un appendice à la liturgie qu’une pièce convenant à une exécution dévotionnelle privée. Quelle que soit la raison pour laquelle les compositeurs négligèrent plus ou moins ce texte, la version de Rore compte parmi les plus beaux motets du XVIe siècle. Elle part sur une déclamation directe du mot «Frères», démarquée en une section introductive séparée; la texture est ensuite construite en partant de la basse, avec des échos à la voix supérieure doublée, avant un traitement homophonique du saint nom de Jésus. Puis l’évocation de la bénédiction du pain est traitée en un style imitatif archaïsant, appariant à la file les voix de superius et de bassus; une retentissante phrase descendante met en musique les mots «prenez, mangez», avant que le «ceci est mon corps» central ne soit entièrement lancé à partir de la texture environnante en blocs d’accords. Leur notation, en mesure ternaire, recourt à la technique de la coloration et pour séparer cette section sur la page et pour créer l’effet d’une série de points d’orgue, sans pour autant suspendre le tactus sous-jacent. L’affirmation de la Présence réelle dans la communion est ainsi traitée en musique comme un mystère opportunément divin. La section finale revient au mètre binaire pour clore le motet sur une énonciation répétée de la phrase «faites ceci en souvenir de moi».

Illuxit nunc sacra dies est une pièce plus directe et beaucoup plus courte, célébrant la Nativité. Ses rythmes vigoureux, son recours à l’imitation en tierces et aux entrées en strette serrées contribuent au sentiment de réjouissance, que souligne, vers la fin, une brève section ternaire.

La seconde messe enregistrée ici a pour titre Missa a note negre, reflet de sa parenté avec le sous-genre du madrigal, qui devint populaire dans les années 1550 et abondait en valeurs de note accourcies—d’où les «notes noires»—pour une œuvre encore plus madrigalesque dans sa déclamation que la Missa Doulce mémoire. Comme nous l’avons dit, elle repose sur une autre chanson, mise en musique par Rore:

Tout ce qu’on peut en elle voir
N’est que douceur et amitié,
Beauté, bonté, et un vouloir
Tout plein d’amoureuse pitié.
Mais je n’en suis édifié
De rien mieux, car le regard d’elle
Me met en une peine telle
Que ne la puis dire à moitié.
Si ne la vois, je me lamente,
Quand je la vois, je me tourmente:
Le doux n’est jamais sans l’amer,
Voilà que c’est de trop d’aymer.

Cette chanson mêle les styles de Paris et des Pays-Bas; au traitement homophonique des huit premiers vers succèdent une section imitative puis un retour à une déclamation directe pour le lapidaire couplet final. La mise en musique de cette messe est relativement conventionnelle en ce qu’elle use de la phrase inaugurale pour commencer le Kyrie et le Gloria, même si, dans les mouvements ultérieurs, le motif en tierces ascendantes migre aux voix intérieures que sont l’altus dans le Credo et le Sanctus, et le second tenor dans l’Agnus Dei. Autre remarquable emprunt au modèle: la phrase lente qui apparaît vers la fin de plusieurs mouvement, où le cantus atteint un ré grave (sonnant comme l’ut central au diapason retenu ici), d’après la phrase «Voilà que c’est», dans le dernier vers de la chanson. Comme dans la Missa Doulce mémoire, une section centrale du Credo est réduite à quatre voix, et le Benedictus est un trio; le second Agnus est pareillement étendu à six voix, mais ici la voix supplémentaire est un second cantus, qui allège la texture tout en ajoutant un poids sonore bâtissant une impressionnante supplique stylée avant que la messe ne se retire en un paisible «dona nobis pacem» ternaire.

Stephen Rice © 2013
Français: Hypérion

Cipriano de Rore gehört zu den großen Namen in der Geschichte des Madrigals, jenes Genre weltlicher Musik, das die Musikkultur Italiens in der zweiten Hälfte des 16. Jahrhunderts dominierte. Ebenso wie andere Pioniere auf diesem Gebiet war er selbst kein Italiener, sondern stammte aus den Niederlanden und war in Ronse (bzw. auf Französisch: Renaix) geboren, das an der flämisch-französischen Sprachgrenze und im heutigen Belgien liegt. Neben den älteren Komponisten des Nordens, wie etwa Philippe Verdelot und Adrian Willaert, vereinte Rore die kontrapunktische Komplexität des niederländischen Polyphonie-Stils mit poetischen italienischen Texten und erzeugte daraus ein neues, expressives Genre in der Volkssprache. Im Laufe des Jahrhunderts drückten die Madrigale—zum erheblichen Teil dank Rores Innovationen—die Texte, die in ihnen vertont waren, mit immer stärkerer Expressivität aus, so dass schließlich nicht mehr der Kontrapunkt an erster Stelle stand, sondern der Text in deutlicheren, eher homophonen Strukturen, der schließlich monodisch deklamiert wurde.

Eine kurze Abhandlung über die Geschichte des Madrigals mag als Einleitung zu einer CD mit geistlicher Musik eigenartig wirken, doch ist dies im Falle von Rore aus zwei Gründen unerlässlich. Der erste liegt darin, dass sein Ruhm zu einem unverhältnismäßig großen Anteil auf seinen Leistungen im Bereich der weltlichen Musik beruht, und dort eben hauptsächlich in der Madrigalkomposition, aber auch in Chansons und einem beträchtlichen Korpus an weltlichen Werken mit lateinischen Texten, in dem sich das gesteigerte Interesse an der Antike und den entsprechenden lyrischen Formen, die im Italien der Mitte des 16. Jahrhunderts gängig waren, widerspiegelte. Die vorliegende Aufnahme schlägt damit eine neue Richtung ein, indem hier einige weniger bekannte Aspekte des Oeuvres eines Komponisten vorgestellt werden, der auf anderen Gebieten zu Recht berühmt ist.

Der zweite Grund, auf seine Madrigalkompositionen einzugehen, erklärt sich aus dem Ausmaß, mit dem die damit verbundenen Aufführungspraktiken sich in der geistlichen Sphäre zu Rores Lebzeiten ausbreiteten, und auch in dieser Hinsicht war sein Einfluss auf diese Entwicklungen bedeutsam. Wenn man Rores Stil der Musik seines direkten Zeitgenossen Jacobus Clemens non Papa gegenüberstellt, so werden die Unterschiede sofort deutlich, insbesondere was die Struktur anbelangt. Obwohl beide Komponisten vornehmlich für fünf Stimmen komponierten, stehen die einander überlagernden und ständig wechselnden Stimmkombinationen bei Clemens im krassen Gegensatz zu der klaren, oft quasi-homophonen Textdeklamation bei Rore.

Rores musikalische Karriere fand gänzlich in Italien statt. Es ist möglich, dass er bereits als Kind dort war, eventuell im Gefolge von Margarethe von Parma (die uneheliche Tochter Kaiser Karls V.), doch ist er erstmals 1542 in Brescia schriftlich aufgeführt. Das Ausmaß und die Vielfältigkeit der Widmungen an italienische Adelige, die sich in seinen Werken aus den 1540er Jahren finden, lassen auf verstärkte Bemühungen schließen, sich eine vorteilhafte Anstellung an einem Hof zu sichern; fast die Hälfte seiner überlieferten Kompositionen stammen aus dieser frühen, freischaffenden Zeit.

1546 war Rore dann bereits eine Stelle übertragen worden, und zwar als maestro di cappella am Hofe von Ercole II. d’Este, Herzog von Ferrara, der der Enkel von Ercole I. war, dessen Name der berühmten Komposition Missa Hercules Dux Ferrarie von Josquin Des Prez zugrunde liegt. Rore sollte zwölf produktive Jahre lang in Ferrara bleiben, wo er unter vielen anderen Werken auch seine eigene Missa Hercules Dux Ferrarie komponierte, die auf einem wiederkehrenden Ostinato-Motiv basiert. 1558 verließ er den Este-Hof, zunächst vorübergehend, um in das heimatliche Flandern zu reisen, doch sollte sich diese Beurlaubung als endgültiger Abschied herausstellen, da Ercole im darauffolgenden Jahr starb und daraufhin Francesco dalla Viola anstelle von Rore engagiert wurde. Seine nächste und letzte Anstellung war am Farnese-Hof in Parma, wo er im Jahre 1565 starb.

Beiden hier vorliegenden Messvertonungen liegen französische Chansons zugrunde—im Falle der Missa a note negre handelt es sich um eine Komposition von Rore selbst, während die Missa Doulce mémoire auf einem der größten „Hits“ des 16. Jahrhunderts von Pierre Regnault, genannt Sandrin basiert. Die Chanson Doulce mémoire wurde 1537 oder 1538 von dem Buchdrucker Jacques Moderne in Lyon publiziert. Das Thema ist, wie so oft bei diesem Genre, verlorene Liebe:

Doulce mémoire en plaisir consommée,
O siècle heureux qui cause tel sçavoir.
La fermeté de nous deux tant aymée
Qui à nos maux a su si bien pourvoir.
Or maintenant a perdu son pouvoir
Rompant le but de ma seulle espérance,
Servant d’exemple à tous piteux a voir.
Fini le bien, le mal soudain commence.
Süße Erinnerung vollendeter Freude,
O fröhliche Zeit derartigen Wissens;
Die Standhaftigkeit unserer Liebe,
die unsere Schmerzen so gut vertrieb.
Nun aber hat sie ihre Kraft verloren
Und vernichtet das Ziel meiner einzigen Hoffnung,
dient als Beispiel, das alle Leidgeplagten sehen können.
Das Gute ist fort, das Böse kommt sogleich.

Das melodische Motiv zu Beginn, das eine absteigende verminderte Quarte nachzeichnet, war eines der geläufigsten Themen des Jahrhunderts. Es zieht sich zwangsläufig durch die Messvertonung von Rore, doch erlaubte seine Berühmtheit dem Komponisten ebenfalls, die Musik Sandrins zu bearbeiten, ohne dass dabei der Charakter der Chanson verlorenging. Die Chanson ist im Pariser Stil komponiert und hat eine deutlich stärker akkordische als imitative Struktur; Rores Ansatz bei Messkompositionen zeichnete sich oft durch homophone Textvertonung aus, so dass hier zwei durchaus ähnliche Kompositionsstile vorliegen. Die Messe ist jedoch vornehmlich fünfstimmig gehalten, während die Chanson vierstimmig ist: den Gepflogenheiten der Zeit entsprechend, haben gewisse Abschnitte eine reduzierte Anlage, obwohl Rore in dieser Hinsicht noch sparsamer als viele seiner Zeitgenossen vorgeht. Der Mittelteil des Credos („Et ascendit …“) ist für vier Stimmen gesetzt, wobei eine der Tenorstimmen schweigt, und das Benedictus ist ein Trio für Cantus, Altus und Tenor. Das Agnus Dei ist in zwei Abschnitten notiert, wobei im zweiten (ab 1'30) eine Baritonstimme hinzutritt, so dass sich eine sechsstimmige Struktur ergibt: tatsächlich sind die drei Textabschnitte dieses Satzes derart aufgeteilt, dass in dem sechsstimmigen Teil sowohl der zweite als auch der dritte Textteil artikuliert werden, wobei dazwischen eine hörbare Zäsur (bei 3'46) erfolgt. Wie so oft im 16. Jahrhundert zeigt sich der Komponist im Agnus Dei von seiner besten Seite, doch sind andere Sätze der Messe ebenfalls aufgrund der textbetonten Ausdruckskraft von Rores Vertonung bemerkenswert, so etwa das Sanctus, wo durch vorbildliche Textdeklamation zu Beginn erhebliche rhetorische Kraft aufgebaut wird, oder im zweiten Kyrie und im „Et incarnatus“ des Credo, die beide aus dem letzten Couplet der Chanson von Sandrin entwickelt sind.

In den Motetten O altitudo divitiarum und Fratres: Scitote sind jeweils Texte des Heiligen Paulus vertont, die beide nachdenklicher Natur sind. Die erste ist eine Meditation über die Heiligkeit und Weisheit Gottes, die für Menschen unergründlich ist. Der hohe imitative Stil der Niederlande scheint für ein derart erhabenes Thema passend zu sein, wo sich langsam bewegende Vorhalte und Durchgangstöne die Mühe illustrieren, die es uns bereitet, die Großartigkeit des Allmächtigen zu verstehen. Gegen Ende des Stücks tritt die gesamte Besetzung auf, um gemeinsam „Denn von ihm und durch ihn …“ zu singen; danach kehrt der Kontrapunkt zurück, bis das letzte Amen erklingt. Ausnahmsweise wird Rores Technik hier als meditative und nicht als exegetische Reaktion auf den Text eingesetzt.

Anders als O altitudo divitiarum, das von mehr als einem Dutzend von Rores Zeitgenossen vertont wurde, von denen Orlando di Lasso sicherlich der berühmteste ist, ist Fratres: Scitote offenbar die einzige Vertonung dieses Texts. Paulus erzählt hier die Geschichte des letzten Abendmahls, bei dem Jesus Brot nimmt, es segnet und verteilt, und damit das Ritual des Abendmahls im Gottesdienst begründet. Dieser Text, der in jeder Messfeier rezitiert oder gesungen wird, war (und ist) allen Christen als einer der heiligsten überhaupt bekannt—es ist möglich, dass eben diese zentrale Bedeutung für die Messliturgie dafür verantwortlich ist, dass es keine Parallelvertonungen dieses Texts gibt. Es waren dies Worte, die von dem zelebrierenden Priester gesprochen und nicht an die Sänger weitergegeben wurden; Rores Motette war daher wohl eher für eine Art Privatandacht gedacht denn als Anhang zur Liturgie. Worin der Grund auch immer gelegen haben mag, weshalb die Komponisten diesen Text förmlich vernachlässigten, diese Vertonung ist jedenfalls eine der besten Motetten des gesamten Jahrhunderts. Rore beginnt mit einer deutlichen Deklamation des Wortes „Brüder“, das als eigenständige Einleitung abgegrenzt ist. Darauf wird die Struktur vom Bass ausgehend errichtet, wobei in der verdoppelten Oberstimme Echos vorkommen, bevor eine homophone Behandlung des heiligen Namens Jesu erklingt. Die darauffolgende Erzählung der Segnung des Brotes ist in einem imitativen Stil vertont, der insofern etwas altertümlich anmutet, als dass Ober- und Unterstimmen gepaart und nacheinander auftreten; eine klangvolle absteigende Phrase erklingt zu den Worten „nehmt, esst“, bevor das zentrale „das ist mein Leib“ völlig von der darumliegenden Struktur in Blockakkorden initiiert wird. Diese sind im Dreiertakt notiert, wobei dieser Abschnitt durch kolorierte Noten auf der Seite hervorgehoben wird; dazu tritt der Effekt einer Reihe von Fermaten, die jedoch den zugrundeliegenden Taktus nicht verändern. Die Zusicherung der Realpräsenz Jesu Christi in der Eucharistie wird daher musikalisch entsprechend als göttliches Mysterium dargestellt. Im letzten Abschnitt kehrt die Musik in einen Zweiertakt zurück und die Motette wird mit dem wiederholten Satz „tut dies zu meinem Gedächtnis“ abgerundet.

Illuxit nunc sacra dies ist ein schlichteres und viel kürzeres Stück, in dem die Geburt Christi gefeiert wird. Die lebhaften Rhythmen, Imitation in Terzen und engen Stretto-Einsätze tragen alle zu der jubelnden Atmosphäre bei, die ein kurzer Abschnitt im Dreiertakt kurz vor Ende ebenfalls untermauert.

Die zweite hier vorliegende Messe trägt den Titel Missa a note negre, womit auf ihre Beziehung zu dem Madrigal-Subgenre angespielt wird, das um die Mitte des Jahrhunderts beliebt wurde, wobei überwiegend kürzere Notenwerte zum Einsatz kamen—daher „schwarze Noten“. Diese Messe ist daher in ihrer Deklamation sogar noch madrigalischer als die Missa Doulce mémoire. Wie bereits oben angemerkt, liegt ihr eine Chanson von Rore selbst zugrunde:

Tout ce qu’on peut en elle voir
N’est que douceur et amitié,
Beauté, bonté, et un vouloir
Tout plein d’amoureuse pitié.
Mais je n’en suis édifié
De rien mieux, car le regard d’elle
Me met en une peine telle
Que ne la puis dire à moitié.
Si ne la vois, je me lamente,
Quand je la vois, je me tourmente:
Le doux n’est jamais sans l’amer,
Voilà que c’est de trop d’aymer.
Alles, was in ihr zu sehen ist,
ist nur Milde und Freundschaft,
Schönheit, Güte und ein Geist
des liebevollen Mitgefühls.
Doch inspiriert mich dies nicht
Zu Besserem, da ihr Anblick
In mir derartigen Schmerz verursacht,
den ich nicht einmal zur Hälfte beschreiben kann.
Wenn ich sie nicht sehe, beklage ich mich,
wenn ich sie sehe, bin ich gepeinigt:
Das Süße ist nie ohne Bitterkeit,
so ist es, zu sehr zu lieben.

In dieser Chanson wird der Pariser Stil mit dem niederländischen kombiniert; sie beginnt mit einer homophonen Behandlung der ersten acht Zeilen, worauf ein imitativer Abschnitt folgt, bevor das lapidare letzte Couplet direkt deklamiert wird. Die Messvertonung ist insofern recht konventionell, als dass zu Beginn des Kyrie und des Gloria die Eröffnungsphrase verwendet wird, doch bewegt sich das aufsteigende Terzmotiv in späteren Sätzen in die Mittelstimmen—in die Altstimme im Credo und Sanctus, und in die zweite Tenorstimme im Agnus Dei. Eine weitere bemerkenswerte Anlehnung an das Vorbild ist die tiefe Phrase, die sich am Ende mehrerer Sätze findet, wo der Cantus das tiefe D erreicht (welches bei der hier verwendeten Tonhöhe als eingestrichenes C erklingt), die aus der Phrase „Voilà que c’est“ der letzten Chanson-Zeile abgeleitet ist. Ebenso wie in der Missa Doulce mémoire ist ein zentraler Abschnitt des Credo auf vier Stimmen reduziert und das Benedictus ist ein Trio: das zweite Agnus Dei ist in ähnlicher Weise auf sechs Stimmen ausgedehnt, obwohl hier eine zweite Cantusstimme hinzugefügt ist, was die Textur einerseits aufhellt, aber wodurch andererseits auch ein klangliches Gewicht hinzufügt wird, das sich zu einer eindrucksvollen rhetorischen Bitte hin entwickelt, bevor die Messe mit einem friedvollen „dona nobis pacem“ im Dreiertakt ausklingt.

Stephen Rice © 2013
Deutsch: Viola Scheffel