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Hyperion Records

CDA67828 - Wiklund: Piano Concertos
CDA67828
Recording details: September 2010
Helsingborg Concert Hall, Sweden
Produced by Andrew Keener
Engineered by Simon Eadon & Dave Rowell
Release date: June 2012
Total duration: 74 minutes 54 seconds

IRR 'OUTSTANDING' AWARD

'Really deserves this reappraisal: [Wiklund] has Rachmaninov's talent for big, sweeping statements and Grieg's way with a sweet melody. It's a winning combination, beautifully captured here by Martin Sturfält and the Helsingborg players under the sure direction of increasingly interesting violinist-turned-conductor Andrew Manze' (The Observer)

'Wiklund's concertos … stand up to the finest of competition. Whilst they are rooted in a late-Romantic style, there are also shades of Rachmaninov and Medtner, the exuberant virtuosity of York Bowen in his concertos, something of the bleakness of Sibelius and Stenhammar … throughout all three works, it's Wiklund's melodic gifts that never wane … there is a huge amount to enjoy, with moments of real beauty and sophistication in every aspect of the music-making … Sturfält is certainly hard to fault: he has the measure of these concertos, and the refinement and good taste to ensure they never become overblown … this is a fabulous and very worthy addition to a series that shows no signs yet of diminishing returns: long may it continue' (International Record Review)

The Romantic Piano Concerto
Piano Concertos
Allegro energico  [13'38]
Allegro vivace  [9'48]

Volume 57 in Hyperion’s Romantic Piano Concerto series turns up another ‘discovery’: the music of Swedish composer Adolf Wiklund. These little-known but lusciously tuneful works are characterized by big-boned, symphonic gestures reminiscent of Rachmaninov, yet tempered with the Nordic clarity of Grieg. Wiklund’s two piano concertos are central to his output, and in fact they enjoyed considerable popularity in Sweden until as recently as fifty years ago, when modernist sensibilities deemed them unfashionable.

This glittering performance from Martin Sturfält and the Helsingborg Symphony Orchestra, directed by brilliant violinist-turned-conductor Andrew Manze, is bound to bring this unfairly neglected music back into general currency.


Other recommended albums
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The three works for piano and orchestra included on the present recording stand out as Adolf Wiklund’s most important works. Although his œuvre comprises some seventy compositions in total, including a handful of symphonic works as well as chamber music and songs, it would probably be fair to say that his fame as a composer, such as it is, relies almost entirely on his two piano concertos. As well as being close to Wiklund’s own heart, these works were audience favourites in Swedish concert programmes until the modernist movement of the 1960s and ’70s deemed them unfashionable. Although they are almost completely unknown today, both concertos exist in several recordings from the 1940s onwards, and while they have mainly been performed by Swedish pianists they have also attracted the attention of the occasional international soloist, including Wilhelm Backhaus, who took up the second concerto and performed it to great acclaim in 1941.

Born in the county of Värmland in the west of Sweden in 1879, Adolf Wiklund started to play the piano and compose at the age of twelve, very much encouraged by his older brother Victor. Their organist father was happy to let Victor pursue a career in music (he subsequently became an important musical figure in Stockholm) but was determined that Adolf should study engineering. Hence at the age of sixteen Adolf was sent to the Technical College in Eskilstuna. These studies were of little interest to him, however, and he spent every free moment composing music. After a year in Eskilstuna a Romance for violin and piano he had written was performed to great acclaim by the local music society, and this proved a turning point both for the young composer and for his father’s opinion of him; Adolf was finally granted permission to dedicate his life to music. He was admitted to the Royal Music Conservatory in Stockholm in 1897 and graduated as an organist and music teacher in 1901. In the years following his graduation he furthered his piano studies with Richard Andersson, who had been a pupil of Clara Schumann, and took lessons in counterpoint from the by then legendary Johan Lindegren, who had taught several generations of Swedish composers. His most important mentor, however, was Wilhelm Stenhammar. Eight years older than Wiklund, Stenhammar introduced him to the symphonic works of Bruckner and Sibelius, and they discussed their own new works together.

The Konsertstycke (‘Concert Piece’) Op 1 was composed during this time, and the year after its completion in 1902 Richard Andersson organized an opportunity for the twenty-four-year-old composer to perform the new work with the orchestra of the Konsertföreningen (the present- day Royal Stockholm Philharmonic) conducted by Tor Aulin; this marked Wiklund’s official debut as both pianist and composer. The performance, as well as the work itself, was met with unanimous enthusiasm by the critics (including the much-feared Wilhelm Peterson-Berger) in all four Stockholm newspapers, notably for its ‘inventive ideas, admirable realization [and] commendable orchestration’, in the words of Adolf Lindgren in Aftonbladet.

The Konsertstycke opens with a serenely majestic orchestral tutti, starting on the dominant seventh and cleverly avoiding the main key for about a minute, creating considerable suspense until its resolution in a radiant fortissimo C major. The piano enters with an extended glittering cadenza using the entire range of the piano in typical Romantic virtuoso fashion; certainly the whole work suggests that Wiklund’s own command of the piano must have been impressive to say the least. Following a short orchestral interlude, recalling the opening material, the work finally takes wing as the main Allegro moderato section is announced by the solo piano. Structurally, the Allegro is loosely based on sonata form, but Wiklund often lets the music deviate from this framework, such as in the atmospheric section that follows the central orchestral tutti as well as in the extended coda. Wiklund’s organically fluid musical style as well as his natural talent for orchestration are clearly evident in this early work, as is the fact that he had picked up a trick or two from studying the scores of Wagner and Bruckner.

Soon after the premiere of his Op 1 Wiklund found himself the recipient of two major grants, and he left Sweden to study abroad. He spent time in both Paris and Berlin, where he studied the piano with James Kwast and Ferruccio Busoni. During a brief spell back in Sweden in the summer of 1906 he rented a cottage on the island of Dalarö in the Stockholm archipelago, and there began work on his Piano Concerto No 1. The idea of a career as a pianist and conductor in Europe still attracted him, however, and an offer to become a repetiteur at the Court Theatre in Karlsruhe in Germany drew him away from Sweden again in 1907. According to some sources the new concerto was premiered before Wiklund’s move to Germany—in January 1907, with the composer as soloist with the Konsertföreningen. But a letter to Stenhammar in December that year suggests that the composer may have carried on working on his concerto during his time in Karlsruhe: ‘My concerto has now been finished for some time. It is now in the key of E minor and has three movements only, the last being a scherzo. I am happy with it as I think it is good.’ A subsequent performance took place in 1909 (or, according to some sources, in 1908) with the Swedish pianist Aurora Molander and the Orchestra of the Royal Opera (Hovkapellet) conducted by Armas Järnefelt. Whether or not this performance was the premiere, or the first performance of a revised version of the concerto that Wiklund had completed in Karlsruhe, remains unclear. Wiklund’s letter to Stenhammar suggests that he changed the tonality of the work (something Stenhammar himself would later do with his Serenade Op 31, which was considered unplayable in its original key), so it seems the concerto underwent considerable revision, whatever its performance history.

In any case, as we know it today Wiklund’s Piano Concerto No 1, Op 10, is in the key of E minor, firmly established by the solo piano in the arresting opening solo. The first movement unfolds in a sonata form of symphonic proportions, both structurally and dynamically, with the vigorous main theme contrasted by a chorale-like second subject. In his mature works, of which the E minor Concerto can be considered the first, Wiklund creates a highly personal, eclectic style within the late Romantic idiom, drawing on a range of stylistic influences; while the sound-world of the first movement is predominantly Germanic with occasional echoes of the Slavic Romantics, the nocturnal second movement by contrast suggests Impressionistic colours (Debussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande had made a big impression on the young Wiklund).

The Andante ma non troppo begins pianissimo, as the previous movement had ended, with an orchestral tutti based on a motif of two oscillating notes accompanied by slowly pulsating low strings and timpani. This creates music at once undulating and static, moving effortlessly between major and minor tonalities as well as gliding in and out of moments of modality so typical of Scandinavian music in the wake of Sibelius. The piano enters secretively with dark repeated chords in B minor, emerging almost unnoticed from the orchestral resonance, and starts building towards the first climax; this quickly fades to make way for a contrasting, more overtly melodic theme presented in the strings and imaginatively embellished by the soloist. The same structure repeats itself once more, with ever-varying timbre and texture, before the music fades away in a subdued coda based on the two-note motif.

Six bars, beginning with a pianissimo timpani roll, connect the slow movement to the energetically playful finale which indeed at least starts very much in the style of a scherzo. The main theme, presented in double octaves by the piano, has a curious origin: the Wiklund family to this day (as related to the author by the composer’s grandson) have a clever way of locating each other if becoming separated in a large crowd: one person whistles two notes, an ascending major second, and listens for a descending fourth from the main note, revealing the location of the other person! The movement offers a considerable display of elegant virtuosity by the soloist and follows the scherzo formula, with the trio section represented by a hymn-like theme, until the extended coda in which a horn quietly reintroduces the chorale theme from the first movement. The music grows to a glorious climax, featuring the main theme of the first movement and the hymn theme from the scherzo, and in its final seconds the music returns to the whirling scherzo material in a triumphant E major.

In 1908 Wiklund moved from Karlsruhe to Berlin to take up positions as repetiteur at the Royal Opera and Etelka Gerster’s Opera School, and stayed there for three years gaining valuable conducting experience. In 1911 came the offer of a conducting post at the Stockholm Royal Opera which was enough to make the thirty-two-year-old Wiklund give up the idea of an international career and settle in Sweden. His achievements with the opera and later the orchestra of the Konsertföreningen were of great importance in Sweden, but meant that he found little time to compose.

Nevertheless, in the summer of 1916 (again spent on Dalarö) he found the inspiration to compose another piano concerto, which was premiered in March 1917, once again with the Hovkapellet conducted by Armas Järnefelt, and the composer at the piano. The Piano Concerto No 2 in B minor, Op 17 is in three movements played without a break. More condensed than its predecessor, its orchestration and form are more refined, an obvious development during the intervening decade.

While the music is conceived firmly within the boundaries of tonality (Wiklund remained true to his late- Romantic ideals throughout his life), the B minor Concerto displays occasional moments of harmonic ambiguity and unexpected forays into distant keys. The somewhat harsh opening statement from the orchestra is certainly one such instance: two bars of seemingly unrelated major thirds and minor seconds followed by a downward cascade. However, as soon as the piano enters, presenting the distinctly Scandinavian-flavoured main theme in the fourth bar, we have a solid B minor footing. This muscular opening solo is followed by an extended orchestral tutti; this leads to a transitional passage hinting at the second theme, which with its dactylic rhythms and parallel intervals seems to pay tribute to the composer’s great friend and mentor, Wilhelm Stenhammar. After a development of the thematic material, offering much integrated dialogue between the piano and orchestra, the movement’s sonata form is interrupted by a quiet reminiscence of the second theme ending on an unresolved G sharp major seventh chord, leaving a single pianissimo note hanging in the air, first played by a horn then taken over by a clarinet as the second movement begins.

In what must be considered one of Wiklund’s most inspired passages, the clarinet slowly works its way chromatically upwards while syncopated string chords underneath move in contrary motion seemingly without ever resolving. Gradually the full orchestra enters and an F sharp major tonality is eventually established. As in the second movement of the Op 10 concerto, the piano enters in a secretive manner, drawing dark sonorities from the depth of the instrument and gradually growing to a fortissimo climax, before falling back to a pianissimo. These waves of shadowy darkness and blazing light intensify in long lines building to a culmination in E major; this is followed by a series of reminiscences of the first movement in a dialogue between the soloist and orchestra.

Back in B minor, and once again in a conspiratorial pianissimo, the main theme of the finale is not so much presented as suggested by a single bassoon. Taken up by the piano, the hushed, somewhat Mephistophelian character is reinforced. The accumulated tension finally erupts in ecstasy which permeates the rest of the movement, which is harmonically the most advanced of the three. The elated coda in particular appears to strive to break its tonal confines by constantly modulating through a series of heavily altered chords, coming as close to expressionism as Wiklund ever did.

Martin Sturfält © 2012


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