Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Arthur Honegger (1892-1955)

Une Cantate de Noël, Cello Concerto & other orchestral works

BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Thierry Fischer (conductor)
Recording details: February 2008
Various recording venues
Produced by Various producers
Engineered by Various engineers
Release date: November 2008
Total duration: 75 minutes 7 seconds

Cover artwork: Angels of Peace (1948) by Jean Théodore Dupas (1882-1964)
Private Collection / Bridgeman Art Library, London
 
Horace victorieux  [21'13]
1
Animé  [0'13]
2
3
4
5
6
Le combat  [2'52]
7
8
9
Cello Concerto
10
11
12
Movement 2b: Cadenza  [1'51]

with Alban Gerhardt (cello)
13
Prélude, Fugue et Postlude  [12'46]  
14
Prélude  [5'05]
15
Fugue  [5'16]
16
Postlude  [2'25]
Une Cantate de Noël  [24'40]
17
18

Honegger’s Une Cantate de Noël is a Christmas number with a difference. His last work and one of his most popular compositions, it was written for the Basle Chamber Choir and Orchestra in 1953. The text of the cantata is derived from liturgical and popular texts—including Psalms and part of the Latin Gloria. A notable feature is the intertwining of traditional carols in French and German: appropriate for multilingual Switzerland and also perhaps symbolizing peace among nations seven years after the conclusion of World War II. Honegger scored the cantata for solo baritone, mixed chorus, children’s choir and an orchestra including organ. The combination of the different texts and forms creates a wonderfully uplifting effect.

This recording from the BBC National Orchestra of Wales under Thierry Fischer also includes a selection of Honegger’s other great orchestral works, all displaying the serious symphonic intent which marked his greatest compositional achievements. Horace victorieux is described as a Symphonie mimée d’apres Tite-Live (‘mimed symphony after Livy’) and was originally conceived as a ballet. The scenario derives from the Roman legend of the combat of the Horatii and the Curiatii. Scored for a large orchestra, it is flamboyant, dissonant, even raucous, and highly coloured. Honegger’s mastery of fugue, so prevalent in Horace victorieux, is further illustrated in his Prélude, Fugue et Postlude.

Honegger’s Cello Concerto was premiered in Boston in 1930 and is a charming, urbanely lyrical work, with a distinct tinge of jazz—perhaps actuated by the thought of the American premiere. It was written for the celebrated cellist Maurice Maréchal, who wrote the cadenza himself. In the event, Maréchal provided a brilliantly effective display-piece taking advantage of many of the outrageous aspects of virtuoso cello technique (notably majestic triple- and quadruple-stopping). The brilliant young cellist Alban Gerhardt, celebrated for his performances of little-known cello concertos in Hyperion’s Romantic Cello Concerto series, is the soloist.

Awards

BBC MUSIC MAGAZINE DISC OF THE MONTH

Reviews

'Fischer directs controlled but expressive accounts of all four works which would grace any collector's shelves' (Gramophone)

'Here is an excellent introduction to a still underrated composer … in the Concerto, Alban Gerhardt ranges from the seductive to the sensational: for the opening, Thierry Fischer conjures up a wonderful dream atmosphere, and at the other end of the scale Gerhardt gives a terrific account of Maurice Maréchal's authorised cadenza … [Prélude, Fugue et Postlude] is one of Honegger's great unknown masterpieces, and Fischer's orchestral balance captures perfectly the personal quality of the three majestic chords that open the Prélude—they could be by no-one else' (BBC Music Magazine)

'This beautfully judged account of Honegger's Christmas cantata, his last complete work, makes this collection an appropriately seasonal release. But the three other major works here are fascinating … Alban Gerhardt, who seems to make a speciality of less well known 20th-century cello concertos, is the outstanding soloist' (The Guardian)

'This gleaming new recording … the Cello Concerto is a debonair score with a bluesy turn-of-phrase that suggests Honegger was spinning Duke Ellington records on his turntable. Gerhardt plays with genuine soul' (Classic FM Magazine)

'If Santa can only bring you one present this Christmas, make it the Hyperion recording of Honegger's Une Cantate de Noël' (Birmingham Post)

'This superbly recorded release significantly adds to the Honegger discography. Despite giving top billing to Une Cantate de Noël, all four works here are of the highest level of craftsmanship' (ClassicalSource.com)

Other recommended albums

Vasks & Weill: Violin Concertos
CDA67496
'My preference, and my endeavour, has always been to write a music which would be understandable to the great majority of listeners and at the same time sufficiently free of banality to interest the connoisseurs.’ Arthur Honegger’s credo, in his 1951 monograph Je suis compositeur, seems modest enough. What he leaves out of account here are the sheer qualities of imagination and inspiration that so often transform his large output and are well illustrated by the works on the present disc.

Honegger was born in Le Havre, but he was Swiss by parentage and nationality and began his studies at the Zurich Conservatoire. He undertook further study in Paris, however, and spent much of the rest of his life living in Montmartre, becoming closely identified with developments in French music between the Wars. He was one of the circle of young composers who clustered round the venerably eccentric figure of Erik Satie, and before long he was identified—along with his friend Milhaud and Poulenc, Auric, Tailleferre and Durey—as a member of ‘Les Six’, the notorious group of iconoclastic bright young things of 1920s musical Paris.

Under the guidance of Satie and Cocteau, Les Six are best remembered for an output of flippantly satirical ‘entertainment music’ and the cultivation of a ‘Franco-American’ jazz style; but the weightier creative personalities among them soon began to go their separate ways, and Honegger (arguably the least flippant of them all) did so earliest, with works of such clearly serious import as the ‘mimed symphony’ Horace victorieux and the dramatic oratorio King David, both premiered in 1921. Honegger was much concerned with the union of music with the other arts, and made significant contributions to stage, radio and cinema (including the original score to Abel Gance’s film Napoléon). He had a son by the singer Claire Croiza, but in 1927 married the pianist Andrée Vaurabourg, and they toured widely in Europe and the USA. During World War II he remained in Paris; in 1947 he taught in the USA at Tanglewood, Massachusetts, where he suffered a heart attack that left him an invalid for the remainder of his life.

Much of Honegger’s œuvre has retreated into obscurity since his death in 1955. However, even his most ‘notorious’ works, for instance the symphonic movements Pacific 231 (1923) and Rugby (1928), manifested a serious symphonic intent behind their surface effects of orchestral onomatopoeia, and it was in fact in the forms of symphony, oratorio and chamber music that he achieved his most lasting successes. Horace victorieux (‘Horatius victorious’), described as a Symphonie mimée d’après Tite-Live (‘mimed symphony after Livy’), which he composed in the winter of 1920–21, was really the first work in which Honegger showed his mettle as a composer of serious, large-scale orchestral works. Though dedicated to Serge Koussevitsky, it was premiered in Geneva on 2 November 1921 under the baton of Ernest Ansermet. Koussevitsky however gave the French premiere in Paris on 1 December; after which Ansermet introduced it to London a fortnight later, setting in motion Honegger’s international reputation.

The designation ‘mimed symphony’ refers to the fact that Horace victorieux was originally conceived as a ballet, and its music is therefore suited to and calculated for dance, motion and gesture. Nevertheless it functions equally well as a single-movement symphony or symphonic poem. The scenario, as reflected in the music, derives from the Roman legend of the combat of the Horatii and the Curiatii, narrated by Livy in Book I, chapters 24–6 of his Historia. In 668BC Tullus Hostilius, third king of Rome, went to war with the people of neighbouring Alba Longa. It was decided that the outcome should rest on a formal combat between two sets of male triplets, the three Horatius brothers on the Roman side and the three Curiatius brothers from Alba Longa, who were of the same age. Early in the contest, two of the Horatii were killed; and the three Curiatii, though wounded, came after the last Horatius, Publius, but he managed to split up his pursuers and kill them one by one. When he returned to Rome, victorious, his sister—who had been betrothed to one of the Curiatii—saw he was bearing her lover’s cloak: stricken with grief, she wept. Publius Horatius forthwith ran her through with his sword, exclaiming ‘So perish any Roman woman who mourns the enemy!’ Livy relates that he was condemned to death for this savage act, but was pardoned when his aged father appealed to the people.

The subject had already inspired two great works of French art, the tragedy Horace by Pierre Corneille (1640) and Jacques-Louis David’s dramatic painting The Oath of the Horatii (1784). Honegger’s scenario shows some signs of being derived from Livy via Corneille, and gives Horatius’s sister (here referred to as Camilla) prominence at the beginning of the musical drama rather than, as in Livy, only at the end.

His sole previous orchestral work of any consequence had been the exquisitely placid Pastorale d’été, modest in its dimensions and orchestral forces. To that restrained achievement Horace victorieux stands in the starkest possible contrast. Scored for a large orchestra, it is flamboyant, dissonant, even raucous, and highly coloured. It would seem that the tone poems of Richard Strauss, and perhaps his ballet Josephslegende, were among Honegger’s models; as probably were the exotic scores of the most Straussian of his French contemporaries, Florent Schmitt.

Horace victorieux can be divided into sections which correspond to the scenario but which also resemble to some extent the exposition, development, interpolated scherzo and recapitulation of a one-movement symphonic scheme. After a few bars of furious, brazen introduction we hear an extended episode depicting the love of Camilla for Curiatius. This languid yet sinister music has a hypnotic intensity: the highly chromatic writing with large, dissonant intervals in the strings borders on a kind of Bergian expressionism. The three Horatii enter to the strains of a martial, determined fugato, counterpointed against the gentler flute theme of Camilla. After the fugato is taken up by the brass the crowd of spectators gathers to witness the impending contest.

The following section depicts the announcement and preparation for the combat, corresponding to a symphonic development section. The music of Camilla and Curiatius is recalled in expressive instrumental solos contrasted with an angular, fragmented version of the Horatius brothers’ fugal theme and brassy fanfares. The combat itself, violent and dissonant, its abrupt rhythms reminiscent of Stravinsky’s Le sacre du printemps, continues the development process in more scherzo-like style. In this brilliant and striking section Honegger’s future mastery of symphonic motion is revealed. The texture is once again essentially fugal, and highly polyphonic, with many competing lines. An agonized climax signals the triumph of Horatius, only to give way to the pathos of Camilla’s music as she mourns her Curiatius. Her death at the hands of her brother refers back to the opening bars of the entire work, now impaled on a repeated, unyielding dissonance.

Honegger’s mastery of fugue is illustrated in his Prélude, Fugue et Postlude. This was first performed in 1948 by the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande conducted by Ernest Ansermet, but the music dates from much earlier, for Honegger extracted and arranged these three pieces from a major dramatic work for reciter, solo singers, chorus and orchestra, Amphion, which he had composed in 1929 to a text by Paul Valéry. Written for Ida Rubinstein, Amphion had been produced at the Paris Opéra in June 1931 but then forgotten after a few concert performances. The Prélude, Fugue et Postlude can be regarded as an independent (and abstract) triptych, but Honegger nonetheless prefaced the score with Valéry’s summary of his drama: ‘Amphion, a mortal man, receives the lyre from Apollo. Music is born from the touch of his fingers. At the emerging sounds, the rocks move, join together: architecture is created. Just as the Hero is about to enter the temple, the figure of a veiled woman approaches him and bars his way. She is Love, or Death: Amphion buries his face in her breast and allows her to lead him away.’

It seems, therefore, that should we wish it we could seek a programmatic element, or at least an emotional correlative, in this triptych. The solemn, discreetly bitonal harmonies of the Prélude and the burgeoning strands of melody that follow could certainly be described as Apollonian, but a mood of striving provokes a climactic passage which leads up to the start of the Fugue. Based on a gawky, angular theme that starts effortfully in the bass, this movement might indeed evoke the movement of rocks, building through suaver countersubjects and episodes to a majestic architectural contrapuntal structure. It passes into a climax with a fateful tolling rhythm that eventually subsides to leave a more meditative mood of acceptance. The final span is lyrically elegiac, and the work ebbs away into the shadows in a spirit of Attic sobriety.

Honegger’s Cello Concerto was composed immediately after Amphion in 1929, for the celebrated cellist Maurice Maréchal, who gave the premiere in Boston, with the Boston Symphony Orchestra conducted by Serge Koussevitsky, in February 1930; he later recorded it with the Paris Conservatoire Concert Society under the composer’s baton. In contrast to Horace victorieux or even the Prélude, Fugue et Postlude the Cello Concerto is an amiable, urbanely lyrical (not to say urban) work, with a distinct admixture of jazz—perhaps actuated by the thought of the American premiere. It is not without its darker and more enigmatic moments; the Andante opening of the first movement, however, seems innocent, song-like: the bluesy harmonies recall Gershwin (whom Honegger knew and admired) though the cello’s nostalgic melodic line seems to speak with a French accent.

A sudden switch to rather harsh and busy contrapuntal activity makes an effective contrast, and the two elements coexist as the movement proceeds, rather as if a soulful soliloquy is continually being broken in upon by the traffic noise of the city streets outside. It is the cello’s lyrical song that has the last word, however. That lyricism turns melancholy and even bitter in the Lento slow movement, where the cello’s voice sounds sombre and protesting against hints of funeral march in the strings and lonely city sounds in brass and woodwind. An impassioned and virtuosic cello recitative provokes an angry orchestral outburst before a delicate dance-like ostinato idea appears in the woodwind and becomes the accompaniment to the cello’s reverie.

The cadenza—Honegger did not provide his own, leaving that task to Maréchal—prefaces the finale. In the event, Maréchal provided a brilliantly effective display-piece taking advantage of some of the aspects of cello technique (notably majestic triple- and quadruple-stopping) of which Honegger had not much availed himself elsewhere in the concerto. It accelerates into the stamping, rumbustious opening theme of the finale. This is a spikily energetic rondo of effervescent humour and syncopated rhythm. Here Honegger the former member of ‘Les Six’ is much in evidence. The principal episode pits the suave cantilena of the cello against obstreperous jazzy exclamations and solos from the wind instruments (the effect strongly anticipates a passage in the finale of Ravel’s G major Piano Concerto, which was written soon after Honegger’s work). The cheerful melange of sound and dance-rhythm in the later stages of the finale includes a hilarious tuba solo as counterpoint to the cello. Just when the fun is at its fastest and most furious, the lazy blues of the work’s opening is recalled for a last moment of languid lyricism before the raffish rout of the Concerto’s final bars.

Honegger’s last composition, and one of his best-loved works, was his Christmas cantata, Une Cantate de Noël, which he composed in 1952–3 for the Basle Chamber Choir and its founder and conductor Paul Sacher, that great benefactor of twentieth-century music, from whom Honegger had received many commissions over the years. It was completed in January 1953, and though Honegger was to live for another two years and ten months further creative work was beyond him. The premiere was given in Basle, conducted by Sacher, on 18 December 1953.

In writing the cantata Honegger in fact based it on music which he had sketched in early 1941. This had been intended for performance in a Passion Play that was to be staged at the Swiss village of Selzach, but the project had been abandoned. (Another spin-off from it was a group of three Psalm-settings for voice and piano, published in 1943.) The text of the cantata is derived from liturgical and popular texts—including Psalms and part of the Latin Gloria. A notable feature is the intertwining of traditional carols in French and German: appropriate for multilingual Switzerland and also perhaps symbolizing peace among nations seven years after the conclusion of World War II. Honegger scored the cantata for solo baritone, mixed chorus, children’s choir and an orchestra including organ.

It is the organ which dominates the slow introduction with which the work begins. The first choral entries are wordless, in the manner of a lament, growing into a passage based on the words of Psalm 130, the ‘De profundis’. The music grows into a baleful march that reaches a dissonant climax. This provokes a choral cry of ‘O come’ which soon expands into a setting of the hymn ‘O come, O come Emmanuel!’ (Honegger does not use the familiar plainchant melody, however). The children’s choir gives reassurance, and then the baritone, with organ and trumpets, announces the birth of Christ in the words of the angel’s Biblical proclamation. The response is a regular quodlibet of German and French carol tunes, in which the Latin Gloria is also heard.

The tempo slows to Adagio, and as the baritone sings the Gloria, a solo treble takes up the words of Psalm 117, the ‘Laudate Dominum’, using its traditional melody. The whole Psalm is then sung by the mixed chorus in triple time, while the children’s voices and trumpets add the plainchant as a descant. In the slow coda we hear a further medley of carols, which are eventually reduced to scattered phrases fading into the serenity of the Christmas night.

Calum MacDonald © 2008

«Mon goût et mon effort ont toujours été d’écrire une musique qui soit perceptible pour la grande masse des auditeurs et suffisamment exempte de banalité pour intéresser cependant les mélomanes.» Ce qu’Arthur Honegger omet, dans ce credo d’apparence plutôt modeste tiré de sa monographie Je suis compositeur (1951), ce sont les véritables qualités d’imagination et d’inspiration qui métamorphosent si souvent sa vaste production et qu’illustrent bien les œuvres du présent disque.

Honegger naquit au Havre mais, d’origine et de nationalité suisse, il commença ses études au Conservatoire de Zurich. Il les approfondit toutefois à Paris et passa dès lors l’essentiel de sa vie à Montmartre, où il fut associé de près aux évolutions de la musique française de l’entre-deux-guerres. Il fit partie du cercle de jeunes compositeurs qui se constitua autour du personnage vénérablement excentrique d’Erik Satie et forma bientôt—avec son ami Milhaud, aux côtés de Poulenc, Auric, Tailleferre et Durey—«Les Six», le fameux groupe de jeunes et brillants iconoclastes du Paris musical des années 1920.

Menés par Satie et Cocteau, Les Six demeurent surtout connus pour leur «musique de divertissement» à la satire désinvolte et pour leur style jazz «franco-américain»; mais les personnalités créatrices les plus fortes ne tardèrent pas à suivre leur propre chemin, à commencer par Honegger (le moins désinvolte des six, pourrait-on dire), qui produisit des œuvres d’une gravité évidente, comme la «symphonie mimée» Horace victorieux et l’oratorio dramatique Le Roi David, créés en 1921. Très intéressé par l’union de la musique avec les autres arts, Honegger apporta d’imporantes contributions à la scène, à la radio et au cinéma (dont la musique originale du Napoléon d’Abel Gance). Après avoir eu un fils de la cantatrice Claire Croiza, il épousa, en 1927, la pianiste Andrée Vaurabourg, avec laquelle il partit en tournée à travers l’Europe et les États-Unis. Resté à Paris pendant la Seconde Guerre mondiale, il alla ensuite enseigner à Tanglewood, dans le Massachusetts, où un infarctus le laissa définitivement invalide.

Après sa mort, en 1955, Honegger a largement sombré dans l’oubli. Pourtant, même ses pages les plus «fameuses», tels les mouvements symphoniques Pacific 231 (1923) et Rugby (1928), laissaient poindre une sérieuse intention symphonique sous leurs effets superficiels d’onomatopée orchestrale, et ce fut d’ailleurs dans la symphonie, l’oratorio et la musique de chambre qu’il composa ses succès les plus durables. Horace victorieux, décrite comme une Symphonie mimée d’après Tite-Live, et rédigée à l’hiver de 1920–21, fut véritablement la première pièce dans laquelle il montra ce dont il était capable comme compositeur d’œuvres orchestrales sérieuses, à grande échelle. Bien que dédiée à Serge Koussevitsky elle fut créée sous la baguette d’Ernest Ansermet, à Genève, le 2 novembre 1921. Koussevitsky en assura cependant la première française, à Paris, le 1er décembre, puis Ansermet la fit découvrir aux Londoniens une quinzaine de jours plus tard, donnant le branle à la réputation internationale de Honegger.

Les mots «symphonie mimée» renvoient au fait qu’Horace victorieux fut d’abord un ballet—d’où cette musique conçue et calculée pour la danse, le mouvement et la gestuelle, mais qui fonctionne tout aussi bien comme symphonie en un seul mouvement ou comme poème symphonique. Le scénario, tel que la musique le reflète, est tiré de la légende romaine du combat des Horaces et des Curiaces relaté par Tite-Live aux chapitres 24–26 du Livre I de son Historia. En 668 av. J.-C., Tullus Hostilius, troisième roi de Rome, partit en guerre contre le peuple d’Albe la Longue, la cité voisine. Il fut décidé que le dénouement reposerait sur un combat solennel entre deux groupes de trois frères du même âge: les Horaces pour Rome et les Curiaces pour Albe la Longue. Au début du combat, deux des Horaces furent tués; malgré leurs blessures, les trois Curiaces pourchassèrent le dernier des Horaces, Publius, mais celui-ci parvint à séparer ses poursuivants et à les tuer un par un. Lorsqu’il rentra à Rome, victorieux, sa sœur vit qu’il avait revêtu la dépouille du Curiace auquel elle était fiancée: éperdue de douleur, elle pleura. Incontinent, Publius Horatius la transperça de son glaive en s’exclamant: «Ainsi périt toute Romaine qui pleure l’ennemi!» Il fut condamné à mort pour cet acte de sauvagerie mais, nous raconte Tite-Live, pardonné quand son vieux père eut imploré le peuple.

Ce sujet avait déjà inspiré deux chefs-d’œuvre de l’art français, la tragédie Horace de Pierre Corneille (1640) et Le serment des Horaces (1784), le saisissant tableau de Jacques-Louis David. Certains indices montrent que le scénario de Honegger dériva de Tite-Live en transitant par Corneille, mais qu’il fait la part belle à la sœur d’Horatius (appelée ici Camille) au début et non uniquement à la fin, comme chez Tite-Live.

Auparavant, la seule œuvre orchestrale quelque peu importante d’Honegger avait été la Pastorale d’été exquisément placide, aux dimensions et aux forces orchestrales modestes. Aux antipodes de cette pièce toute en retenue, Horace victorieux est une composition pour grand orchestre flamboyante, dissonante, voire bruyante, et haute en couleur. Il semblerait que Richard Strauss—par ses poèmes symphoniques et, peut-être, par son ballet Josephslegende—lui ait servi de modèle, tout comme, probablement, les partitions exotiques du plus straussien de ses contemporains français, Florent Schmitt.

Horace victorieux peut être découpé en sections qui correspondent au scénario mais rappellent aussi, dans une certaine mesure, le schéma symphonique en un mouvement avec exposition, développement, scherzo interpolé et réexposition. Passé quelques mesures d’une introduction déchaînée, cuivrée, un épisode prolongé dépeint l’amour de Camille pour Curiace. Cette musique languide mais sinistre a une intensité hypnotique: son écriture extrêmement chromatique, avec de grands intervalles dissonants aux cordes, frise une manière d’expressionnisme bergien. Les trois Horaces entrent aux accents d’un fugato martial, déterminé, contrepointé contre le thème de flûte, plus doux, de Camille. Une fois le fugato repris par les cuivres, les spectateurs se massent pour assister au combat imminent.

La section suivante, qui correspond à un développement symphonique, évoque l’annonce du combat, sa préparation. La musique de Camille et de Curiace est rappelée dans d’expressifs solos instrumentaux, qui contrastent avec une version saccadée, fragmentée du thème fugué des frères Horaces et des fanfares cuivrées. Le combat lui-même, violent et dissonant, aux rythmes hachés façon Le sacre du printemps de Stravinsky, poursuit le processus de développement dans un style davantage apparenté au scherzo. Cette section brillante et saisissante laisse transparaître la manière dont Honegger maîtrisera le mouvement symphonique. De nouveau, la texture est essentiellement fuguée, polyphonique à souhait, avec force lignes en concurrence. Un apogée angoissé annonce le triomphe d’Horace, pour mieux céder la place au pathos de la musique de Camille pleurant son Curiace. Sa mort, des mains de son frère, renvoie aux premières mesures de l’œuvre, désormais empalées sur une dissonance répétée, inflexible.

Sa maîtrise de la fugue, Honegger l’affiche dans son Prélude, Fugue et Postlude créé en 1948 par l’Orchestre de la Suisse romande placé sous la baguette d’Ernest Ansermet. Mais il s’agit d’une musique bien antérieure, car Honegger arrangea ces trois pièces à partir d’une grande œuvre dramatique pour récitant, solistes vocaux, chœur et orchestre baptisée Amphion et composée en 1929 sur un texte de Paul Valéry. Écrit pour Ida Rubinstein, cet Amphion fut produit à l’Opéra de Paris en juin 1931 puis joué quelquefois en concert avant de sombrer dans l’oubli. Le Prélude, Fugue et Postude peut être considéré comme un triptyque indépendant (et abstrait), même si Honegger plaça en exorde de sa partition un résumé de son drame par Paul Valéry: «Amphion, homme, reçoit d’Apollon la lyre. La musique naît sous ses doigts. Au son de la musique naissante, les pierres se meuvent, s’unissent, l’architecture est créée. Au moment où le Héros va monter au Temple, une forme de femme voilée s’approche de lui et lui barre le passage. Amphion cache son visage dans le sein de cette figure, qui est l’Amour ou la Mort, et se laisse entraîner par elle.»

On peut donc, si on le veut, chercher un élément programmatique, ou du moins un corrélatif émotionnel, dans ce triptyque. Les harmonies solennelles, discrètement bitonales, du Prélude et les fils mélodiques naissants qui viennent ensuite pourraient certainement être qualifiés d’apolliniens, mais une atmosphère de lutte déclenche un passage paroxystique menant au début de la Fugue. Fondé sur un thème gauche, haché, qui démarre difficilement à la basse, ce mouvement pourrait vraiment évoquer les pierres qui se meuvent, bâti qu’il est sur des contre-sujets et des épisodes plus suaves pour aboutir à une majestueuse structure architecturale contrapuntique. Survient alors un apogée au funeste rythme de glas, qui finit par le céder à un climat d’acceptation davantage méditatif. Un ultime pan lyriquement élégiaque et l’œuvre disparaît dans l’ombre, dans un esprit sobrement attique.

Toujours en 1929, juste après Amphion, Honegger écrivit son Concerto pour violoncelle pour le célèbre violoncelliste Maurice Maréchal, qui le créa à Boston, en février 1930 (avec le Boston Symphony Orchestra placé sous la baguette de Serge Koussevitsky), avant de l’enregistrer avec la Société des concerts du Conservatoire de Paris dirigée par le compositeur en personne. À l’encontre de Horace victorieux, voire du Prélude, Fugue et Postlude, ce concerto est une œuvre affable, suavement lyrique (pour ne pas dire urbaine), avec un évident mélange de jazz—peut-être motivé par l’idée de la première américaine. Mais il a, lui aussi, sa part d’ombre et d’énigme; l’ouverture Andante du premier mouvement a cependant l’air innocent, comme une chanson: ses harmonies bluesy rappellent Gershwin (qu’Honegger connaissait et admirait), même si la nostalgique ligne mélodique du violoncelle semble avoir un accent français.

Un brusque passage à une activité contrapuntique dure et affairée fait un efficace contraste et les deux éléments coexistent tout au long du mouvement, un peu comme si un mélancolique soliloque était constamment interrompu par le bruit du trafic de la ville, dehors, dans les rues. Mais c’est la chanson lyrique du violoncelle qui a le dernier mot. Ce lyrisme devient nostalgie et même amertume dans le mouvement lent Lento, où la voix du violoncelle paraît sombre, comme si elle protestait contre des insinuations de marche funèbre aux cordes et contre des sonorités urbaines isolées, aux cuivres et aux bois. Un récitatif violoncellistique fervent et virtuose provoque un accès de colère orchestrale avant qu’une délicate et dansante idée d’ostinato n’apparaisse aux bois, pour devenir l’accompagnement de la rêverie violoncellistique.

Honegger laissa la cadenza d’avant le finale à Maréchal, que en fit un morceau démonstratif brillamment efficace exploitant des aspects de la technique violoncellistique (notamment de majestueuses triples et quadruples cordes) fort délaissés par ailleurs. Cette cadenza s’accélère jusqu’au premier thème trépignant, tapageur, du finale—un rondo ombrageusement énergique, à l’humour effervescent et au rythme syncopé. On retrouve bien là l’ancien membre des Six. L’épisode principal dresse la suave cantilène du violoncelle contre de turbulentes exclamations jazzy et des solos aux vents (cet effet anticipe fortement un passage du finale du Concerto pour piano en sol majeur de Ravel, légèrement postérieur à celui de Honegger). Dans le réjouissant mélange de sons et de rythmes de danse qui marque les dernières étapes du finale, un hilare solo de tuba se fait entendre en contrepoint du violoncelle. Au moment même où la drôlerie est au summum de sa rapidité et de son déchaînement, le blues nonchalant du début du concerto est rappelé pour un dernier instant de lyrisme langoureux avant la débâcle dissolue des mesures conclusives.

Honegger laissa la cadenza d’avant le finale à Maréchal, que en fit un morceau démonstratif brillamment efficace exploitant des aspects de la technique violoncellistique (notamment de majestueuses triples et quadruples cordes) fort délaissés par ailleurs. Cette cadenza s’accélère jusqu’au premier thème trépignant, tapageur, du finale—un rondo ombrageusement énergique, à l’humour effervescent et au rythme syncopé. On retrouve bien là l’ancien membre des Six. L’épisode principal dresse la suave cantilène du violoncelle contre de turbulentes exclamations jazzy et des solos aux vents (cet effet anticipe fortement un passage du finale du Concerto pour piano en sol majeur de Ravel, légèrement postérieur à celui de Honegger). Dans le réjouissant mélange de sons et de rythmes de danse qui marque les dernières étapes du finale, un hilare solo de tuba se fait entendre en contrepoint du violoncelle. Au moment même où la drôlerie est au summum de sa rapidité et de son déchaînement, le blues nonchalant du début du concerto est rappelé pour un dernier instant de lyrisme langoureux avant la débâcle dissolue des mesures conclusives.

La dernière œuvre de Honegger—et l’une de ses préférées—est Une Cantate de Noël composée en 1952–3 pour le chœur de chambre de Bâle et son chef-fondateur Paul Sacher, ce grand bienfaiteur de la musique du XXe siècle, qui lui avait, au fil des ans, commandé maintes pièces. Celle-ci fut achevée en janvier 1953 et, si Honegger devait effectivement vivre encore presque trois ans, il fut incapable de poursuivre son travail créatif. La première eut lieu à Bâle, sous la direction de Sacher, le 18 décembre 1953.

Pour écrire sa cantate, Honegger s’appuya en réalité sur une musique ébauchée par ses soins au début de 1941 pour un projet avorté, un mystère de la Passion qui devait être monté au village suisse de Selzach. (De cette esquisse naîtront aussi trois psaumes pour voix et piano publiés en 1943.) Le texte de la cantate emprunte à la liturgie et au chant populaire, dont les psaumes et une partie du Gloria latin, avec un remarquable entrelacs de noëls traditionnels en français et en allemand—bien adapté à la Suisse multilingue et possible symbole de la paix entre les nations, sept ans après la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale. Honegger conçut cette cantate pour baryton solo, chœur mixte, chœur d’enfants et orchestre avec orgue.

C’est l’orgue qui domine la lente introduction initiale. Les premières entrées chorales sont sine littera, comme dans une lamentation, et croissent jusqu’à un passage fondé sur les paroles du psaume 130, le «De profundis». La musique enfle jusqu’à une lugubre marche atteignant à un apogée dissonant, lequel déclenche un cri choral («Ô viens»), qui se développe en une mise en musique de l’hymne «Ô viens, ô viens Emmanuel!» (Honegger n’utilise cependant pas la célèbre mélodie en plain-chant). Le chœur d’enfants prodigue du réconfort puis le baryton, accompagné par l’orgue et les trompettes, annonce la naissance du Christ en reprenant les mots de la proclamation biblique de l’ange. Lui répond un quodlibet standard de noëls allemands et français, auquel se mêle aussi le Gloria latin.

Le tempo ralentit jusqu’à Adagio et, lorsque le baryton chante le Gloria, un soprano solo reprend le psaume 117 («Laudate Dominum») en utilisant la mélodie traditionnelle. Le chœur mixte chante ensuite tout le psaume en mesure ternaire, tandis que les voix d’enfants et les trompettes ajoutent le plain-chant en déchant. La lente coda offre un nouveau pot-pourri de noëls finalement réduits à des phrases éparses s’éteignant dans la sérénité de la nuit de Noël.

Calum MacDonald © 2008
Français: Hypérion

„Meine Vorliebe und mein Bestreben war es immer gewesen, Musik zu schreiben, die dem größten Teil der Zuhörer verständlich bleibt und gleichzeitig genügend frei von Banalität ist, um Musikliebhaber zu interessieren.“ Arthur Honeggers Credo in seiner Monographie Je suis compositeur von 1951 scheint einfach genug. Was er hier aber nicht in Betracht zieht, ist die schiere Qualität seiner Phantasie und Einfälle, die sein umfangreiches Œuvre so oft transformiert, und die auf der vorliegenden CD schön illustriert wird.

Honegger wurde in Le Havre geboren, hatte aber Schweizer Eltern und Nationalität und begann sein Studium am Züricher Konservatorium. Er studierte jedoch in Paris weiter, wohnte einen Großteil seines restlichen Lebens in Montmartre und wurde mit der Entwicklung der französischen Musik in den Zwischenkriegsjahren identifiziert. Er gehörte dem Zirkel junger Komponisten an, die sich um die ehrwürdige exzentrische Gestalt von Erik Satie versammelten, und und sollte bald—neben seinem Freund Milhaud sowie Poulenc, Auric, Tailleferre und Durey—als ein Mitglied von „Les Six“, der berühmt-berüchtigten Gruppe junger Bilderstürmer im musikalischen Paris der 1920er Jahre, identifiziert werden.

„Les Six“ wirkten unter der Anleitung von Satie und Cocteau und sind am besten für ihre Produktion frivol-satirischer „Unterhaltungsmusik“ und der Kultivierung eines frankoamerikanischen Jazzstils bekannt, aber die gewichtigeren kreativen Persönlichkeiten unter ihnen sollten bald ihren eigenen Weg gehen—Honegger (zweifellos der am wenigsten frivole unter ihnen) zuerst mit Werken von solch deutlich seriöser Tragweite wie der „gemimten Symphonie“ Horace victorieux und dem dramatischen Oratorium König David, die beide 1921 uraufgeführt wurden. Honegger bemühte sich viel um die Vereinigung von Musik mit den anderen Künsten und lieferte beträchtliche Beiträge für die Bühne, den Rundfunk und das Kino (einschließlich der Originalpartitur zu Abel Gances Film Napoléon). Er hatte einen Sohn mit der Sängerin Claire Croiza, heiratete 1927 aber die Pianistin Andrée Vaurabourg, mit der er umfangreiche Konzertreisen in Europa und den USA unternahm. Während des Zweiten Weltkrieges blieb er in Paris; 1947 unterrichtete er in den USA in Tanglewood, Massachusetts, wo er einen Herzanfall erlitt, der ihn für den Rest seines Lebens zum Invaliden machte.

Viel von Honeggers Œuvre ist seit seinem Tode 1955 in Vergessenheit geraten. Aber selbst seine „notorischsten“ Werke wie etwa die symphonischen Sätze Pacific 231 (1923) und Rugby (1928) manifestierten hinter ihren oberflächlichen Effekten orchestraler Wortmalerei eine seriöse symphonische Absicht, und er erlangte auf den Gebieten von Symphonie, Oratorium und Kammermusik seine andauerndsten Erfolge. Horace victorieux („Der siegreiche Horaz“), als Symphonie mimée d’apres Tite-Live („Gemimte Symphonie nach Titus Livius“) beschrieben und im Winter 1920–21 komponiert, war eigentlich das erste Werk, in dem Honegger sein wahres Talent als Komponist seriöser großangelegter Orchesterwerke aufwies. Obwohl Serge Koussevitsky gewidmet, wurde sie am 2. November 1921 unter der Stabführung von Ernest Ansermet in Genf uraufgeführt. Koussevitsky gab jedoch am 1. Dezember die französische Erstaufführung in Paris; vierzehn Tage später stellte Ansermet sie in London vor und legte damit das Fundament für Honeggers internationales Ansehen.

Die Bezeichnung „gemimte Symphonie“ bezieht sich darauf, dass Horace victorieux ursprünglich als Ballett konzipiert wurde und die Musik daher für Tanz, Bewegung und Geste angemessen und kalkuliert ist. Sie funktioniert jedoch genau so gut als einsätzige Symphonie oder symphonische Dichtung. Das in der Musik reflektierte Szenarium leitet sich aus der römischen Legende des Wettkampfes zwischen den Horatiern und Curiatiern her, wie Titus Livius sie in Buch 1, Kapitel 24–26 seiner Historia beschreibt. 668 v. Chr. zog Tullus Hostilius, der dritte König von Rom in den Krieg gegen das Volk des benachbarten Alba Longa. Es wurde beschlossen, dass das Auskommen des Krieges durch einen förmlichen Wettkampf zwischen zwei Gruppen männlicher Drillinge entschieden werden sollte: den drei Horatius-Brüdern auf der römischen Seite und den drei gleichaltrigen Curiatius-Brüdern aus Alba Longa. Zwei der Horatier fielen früh im Wettstreit, und die drei Curiatier, obwohl verwundet, fielen über Publius, den letzten Horatius, her, der es jedoch schaffte, seine Verfolger zu zersprengen und einen nach dem anderen zu töten. Als er siegreich nach Rom zurückkehrte, sah seine Schwester—die mit einem der Curiatier verlobt war—dass er den Mantel ihres Geliebten trug und weinte vor Kummer. Publius Horatius erstach sie daraufhin mit seinem Schwert und rief aus: „So soll jede Frau sterben, die um den Feind trauert!“ Titus Livius beschreibt, dass er zwar für diese brutale Tat zum Tode verurteilt, aber begnadigt wurde, als sein betagter Vater das Volk anflehte.

Das Thema hatte bereits zwei große Werke der französischen Kunst inspiriert: die Tragödie Horace von Pierre Corneille (1640) und Jacques-Louis Davids dramatisches Gemälde Der Schwur der Horatier (1784). Honeggers Szenarium weist einige Anzeichen auf, von Titus Livius via Corneille abgeleitet zu sein, und gibt Horatius’ Schwester (die hier Camilla heißt) am Anfang des Musikdramas Prominenz, statt (wie Titus Livius) nur am Ende.

Sein einziges früheres Orchesterwerk von Bedeutung war die exquisit beschauliche Pastorale d’été, mit ihren bescheidenen Dimensionen und Orchesterkräften. Horace victorieux steht zu dieser verhaltenen Leistung im größtmöglichen Gegensatz. Es ist für großes Orchester instrumentiert, extravagant, dissonant, sogar grölend und grell gefärbt. Es scheint, dass die Tondichtungen von Richard Strauss und vielleicht sein Ballett Josephslegende zu Honeggers Vorbildern gehörten wie vielleicht auch die exotischen Partituren des straussischsten seiner französischen Zeitgenossen: Florent Schmitt.

Horace victorieux lässt sich in Abschnitte einteilen, die sowohl dem Szenarium als auch in gewissem Maße der Exposition, Durchführung, eingeschobenem Scherzo und Reprise eines einsätzigen Symphonieschemas entsprechen. Nach einigen Takten furioser, dreister Einleitung hören wir eine ausgedehnte Episode, die die Liebe Camillas zu Curiatius beschreibt. Diese lässige, aber unheilvolle Musik besitzt eine hypnotische Intensität: die hochchromatische Schreibweise mit weiten dissonanten Intervallen in den Streichern grenzt an eine Art Bergschen Expressionismus. Die drei Horatier treten zum Klang eines martialischen, entschlossenen Fugatos ein, das dem sanfteren Flötenthema Camillas entgegengesetzt ist. Nachdem die Blechbläser das Fugato übernommen haben, versammelt sich eine Zuschauermenge, um sich den bevorstehenden Wettkampf anzuschauen.

Der folgende Abschnitt, der mit der symphonischen Durchführung korrespondiert, schildert die Ankündigung und Vorbereitung für den Wettkampf. Die Musik für Camillas und Curiatius’ klingt in Instrumentalsoli nach, die mit einer kantigen, fragmentierten Version des Fugenthemas der Horatien und blechbläserhaften Fanfaren kontrastiert werden. Der Kampf selbst, heftig und dissonant, mit abrupten Rhythmen, die an Strawinskys Le sacre du printemps erinnern, setzt den Durchführungsprozess in eher scherzohaftem Stil fort. In diesem brillanten, verblüffenden Abschnitt enthüllt sich Honeggers spätere Meisterschaft des symphonischen Ablaufs. Der Satz ist wiederum im westlichen fugiert und äußert polyphon mit vielen konkurrierenden Linien. Ein gequälter Höhepunkt signalisiert den Triumph von Horatius, weicht aber bald dem Pathos von Camillas Musik, als sie um ihren Curiatius trauert. Ihr Tod durch die Hand ihres Bruders bezieht sich auf die Anfangstakte des Werks zurück, aber jetzt auf einer wiederholten, unnachgiebigen Dissonanz aufgespießt.

Honeggers meisterliche Handhabung der Fuge wird in seinem Prélude, Fugue et Postlude illustriert. Dies wurde 1948 vom Orchestre de la Suisse Romande unter Ernest Ansermet uraufgeführt, aber die Musik datiert von viel früher, denn Honegger hatte diese drei Stücke aus einem größeren dramatischen Werk Amphion für Sprecher, Solosänger, Chor und Orchester entnommen und arrangiert, das er 1929 auf einen Text von Paul Valéry komponiert hatte. Amphion wurde für Ida Rubinstein geschrieben und im Juni 1931 an der Pariser Opéra inszeniert, geriet aber nach einigen weiteren Konzertaufführungen schließlich in Vergessenheit. Prélude, Fugue et Postlude lässt sich als unabhängiges (und abstraktes) Triptychon betrachten, aber Honegger stellte der Partitur trotzdem Valérys Zusammenfassung seines Dramas voraus: „Amphion, ein Sterblicher, erhält die Leier von Apollo. Unter seinen Fingern wird die Musik geboren. Durch die Klängen der entstehenden Musik bewegen sich die Felsen und fügen sich zusammen, und die Architektur wird kreiert. In dem Moment, als der Held den Tempel betreten will, tritt ihm eine verschleierte Frau entgegen und versperrt ihm den Eingang. Amphion verbirgt sein Gesicht im Busen dieser Gestalt, die die Liebe oder der Tod ist, und lässt sich von ihr wegführen.“

Es scheint also, dass wir in diesem Triptychon nach einem programmatischen Element oder zumindest einem emotionalen Zusammenhang suchen können, wenn wir wollen. Die feierlichen, bitonalen Harmonien des Prélude und die aufkeimenden Melodiefäden, die folgen, könnten sich durchaus als apollonisch bezeichnen lassen, aber eine Stimmung des Wetteifers provoziert eine Steigerung, die zum Einsatz der Fuge führt. Diese basiert auf einem unbeholfenen, kantigen Thema, das mühsam im Bass beginnt, und dieser Satz könnte wohl die Bewegung der Felsen darstellen, die sich durch elegantere Gegenthemen und Episoden in einer majestätischen kontrapunktischen Struktur zusammenfügen. Sie ergießt sich in einen Höhepunkt mit einem schicksalsträchtig läutenden Rhythmus, der schließlich nachgibt und eine nachdenklichere Stimmung von Annahme hinterlässt. Dieser letzte Abschnitt ist lyrisch-elegisch, und das Werk verflüchtigt sich in einem Geist attischer Nüchternheit in die Schatten.

Honeggers Cellokonzert wurde 1929, unmittelbar nach Amphion für den berühmten Cellisten Maurice Maréchal komponiert, der im Februar 1930 in Boston die Uraufführung mit dem Boston Symphony Orchestra unter Serge Koussevitsky spielte; später nahm er das Konzert mit der Konzertvereinigung des Pariser Conservatoires unter der Leitung des Komponisten auf. Im Kontrast zu Horace victorieux oder sogar Prélude, Fugue et Postlude ist das Cellokonzert ein freundliches, weltgewandt-lyrisches (wenn nicht gar urbanes) Werk mit einer entschiedenen Beimischung von Jazz—womöglich durch den Gedanken an die amerikanische Premiere angeregt. Es ist allerdings nicht ohne seine dunkleren, mysteriöseren Momente; aber der Andante-Anfang des ersten Satzes scheint unschuldig-liedhaft: die bluesigen Harmonien erinnern an Gershwin (den Honegger kannte und bewunderte), obwohl die nostalgische Melodielinie des Cellos mit einem französischen Akzent zu sprechen scheint.

Ein plötzlicher Umschwung zu eher harter, geschäftiger kontrapunktischer Aktivität bietet einen wirkungsvollen Kontrast, und die beiden Elemente koexistieren im Verlauf des Satzes als ob Straßenlärm von draußen stetig ein gefühlvolles Selbstgespräch stört. Der lyrische Gesang des Cellos hat jedoch das letzte Wort. Diese Lyrik verwandelt sich im langsamen Satz, Lento, in Melancholie und Bitterkeit; die Stimme des Cellos klingt düster und protestiert gegen die Anklänge eines Trauermarsches in den Streichern und die einsamen, städtischen Klänge in den Bläsern. Ein leidenschaftliches, virtuoses Cello-Rezitativ provoziert einen ärgerlichen Ausbruch bevor in den Holzbläsern eine delikate tänzerische Ostinato-Idee erscheint und zur Begleitung der Träumerei des Cellos wird.

Die Kadenz geht dem Finale voraus—Honegger schrieb keine eigene, sondern überließ diese Aufgabe Maréchal, der ein brillant wirkungsvolles Schaustück lieferte, das einige Aspekte der Cellotechnik ausnutzt (besonders grandiose Tripel- und Quadrupel-Griffe), die Honegger anderswo im Konzert nur wenig verwendete. Sie verschnellert sich in das stampfende, ausgelassene Anfangsthema des Finales. Dies ist ein scharf-energisches Rondo voll sprühendem Humor und synkopierten Rhythmen. Hier zeigt sich Honegger deutlich als ehemaliges Mitglied von „Les Six“. Die Hauptepisode setzt der gewandten Cellokantilene jazzigen Ausbrüchen und Soli der Bläser entgegen (der Effekt antizpiert eine Passage im Finale von Ravels G-dur-Klavierkonzert, das kurz nach Honegger Werk geschrieben wurde). Das fröhliche Gemisch von Klang und Tanzrhythmen in den späteren Stadien des Finales enthält ein urkomisches Tubasolo als Kontrapunkt zum Cello. Und genau, wenn der Spass am tollsten und ausgelassensten ist, wird in einem letzten Moment lässiger Lyrik vor der wilden Jagd der Abschlusstakte noch einmal an den trägen Blues vom Anfang des Werks erinnert.

Die Kadenz geht dem Finale voraus—Honegger schrieb keine eigene, sondern überließ diese Aufgabe Maréchal, der ein brillant wirkungsvolles Schaustück lieferte, das einige Aspekte der Cellotechnik ausnutzt (besonders grandiose Tripel- und Quadrupel-Griffe), die Honegger anderswo im Konzert nur wenig verwendete. Sie verschnellert sich in das stampfende, ausgelassene Anfangsthema des Finales. Dies ist ein scharf-energisches Rondo voll sprühendem Humor und synkopierten Rhythmen. Hier zeigt sich Honegger deutlich als ehemaliges Mitglied von „Les Six“. Die Hauptepisode setzt der gewandten Cellokantilene jazzigen Ausbrüchen und Soli der Bläser entgegen (der Effekt antizpiert eine Passage im Finale von Ravels G-dur-Klavierkonzert, das kurz nach Honegger Werk geschrieben wurde). Das fröhliche Gemisch von Klang und Tanzrhythmen in den späteren Stadien des Finales enthält ein urkomisches Tubasolo als Kontrapunkt zum Cello. Und genau, wenn der Spass am tollsten und ausgelassensten ist, wird in einem letzten Moment lässiger Lyrik vor der wilden Jagd der Abschlusstakte noch einmal an den trägen Blues vom Anfang des Werks erinnert.

Honeggers letzte Komposition und eines seiner beliebtesten Werke war seine Weihnachtskantate Une Cantate de Noël, die er 1952–53 für den Basler Kammerchor und seinen Gründer und Dirigenten Paul Sacher, den großen Mäzen der Musik des 20. Jahrhunderts, schrieb, von dem Honegger im Lauf der Jahre viele Kompositionsaufträge erhalten hatte. Sie wurde im Januar 1953 vollendet, und obwohl Honegger noch zweieinhalb Jahre länger leben sollte, war er keiner weiteren kreativen Arbeit mehr fähig. Die Uraufführung wurde am 18. Dezember 1953, in Basel von Paul Sacher dirigiert.

Honegger basierte die Komposition der Kantate auf Musik, die er Anfang 1941 skizziert hatte. Diese war ursprünglich für eine Aufführung in einem Passionsspiel gedacht, das im Schweizer Dorf Salzach inszeniert werden sollte; dieses Projekt wurde aber aufgegeben. (Ein weiteres Nebenprodukt davon war eine Gruppe von drei Psalmvertonungen für Gesang und Klavier, die 1943 veröffentlicht wurde.) Der Text der Kantate stammt aus liturgischen und populären Texten—einschließlich Psalmen und einem Teil des lateinischen Gloria. Ein bemerkenswertes Merkmal ist die Verflechtung traditioneller Weihnachtslieder auf Französisch und Deutsch: auf die mehrsprachige Schweiz zugeschneidert und sieben Jahre nach dem Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs womöglich auch ein Symbol für den Frieden zwischen den Nationen. Honegger instrumentierte die Kantate für Bariton solo, gemischten Chor, Kinderchor und Orchester einschließlich Orgel. Die Orgel dominiert die langsame Einleitung, mit der das Werk beginnt. Die ersten Choreinsätze sind ohne Worte, in der Manier eines Klagelieds, das sich in eine Passage entwickelt, die auf den Worten des 130. Psalms, „De profundis“, basiert. Die Musik schwillt zu einem unheilvollen Marsch an, der einen dissonanten Höhepunkt erreicht. Dieser provoziert den Chorruf „Oh komm“, der sich bald in einen Satz der Hymne „Oh komm, oh komm Emmanuel!“ ausweitet. (Honegger verwendet jedoch nicht die wohl bekannte Choralmelodie.) Der Kinderchor beschwichtigt, und der Bariton verkündet dann mit Orgel und Trompeten die Geburt Christi in den biblischen Worten der Engelsverkündigung. Die Reaktion ist ein wahres Quodlibet deutscher und französischer Weihnachtslieder, in dem auch das lateinische Gloria zu hören ist.

Das Tempo verlangsamt sich zum Adagio, und als der Bariton das Gloria singt, übernimmt ein Knabensopran die Worte des 117. Psalms, des „Laudate Dominum“, in seiner traditionellen Choralmelodie. Der ganze Psalm wird dann vom gemischten Chor im Dreiertakt gesungen, während die Kinderstimmen und Trompeten die Choralmelodie als Diskant hinzufügen. In der langsamen Coda hören wir ein weiteres Potpourri von Weihnachtsliedern, die schließlich zu zerfetzten Phrasen reduziert werden, die in den Frieden der Weihnachtnacht verklingen.

Calum MacDonald © 2008
Deutsch: Renate Wendel

Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...
Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.