Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

William Byrd (1539/40-1623)

Assumpta est Maria & other sacred music

The Cardinall's Musick, Andrew Carwood (conductor)
Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
CD-Quality:
Studio Master:
CD-Quality:
Studio Master:
 
 
Recording details: Various dates
Fitzalan Chapel, Arundel Castle, United Kingdom
Produced by Jonathan Freeman-Attwood
Engineered by Martin Haskell & Iestyn Rees
Release date: September 2009
Total duration: 69 minutes 21 seconds

Cover artwork: The Death of the Virgin (Ms Fr 71 fol.11) by Jean Fouquet (c1420-1480)
Musée Condé, Chantilly, France / Giraudon / Bridgeman Art Library, London
 
Propers for the Nativity of the Virgin
1
Salve sancta parens  [4'55]
2
Benedicta et venerabilis  [2'33]
3
Felix es, sacra Virgo  [1'36]
4
Beata es, Virgo Maria  [2'10]
5
Beata viscera  [1'48]
6
Quem terra, pontus, aethera  [4'30]
7
Salve regina a 4  [4'23]
8
O gloriosa Domina  [3'41]
Propers for the Annunciation to the Virgin
9
Vultum tuum  [6'16]
10
Diffusa est gratia  [7'10]
11
Ave Maria  [1'45]
12
13
Memento, salutis auctor  [3'05]
14
Salve sola Dei genetrix  [3'04]
15
Ave maris stella  [7'48]
Propers for the Assumption of the Virgin
16
Gaudeamus omnes in Domino  [5'23]
17
Propter veritatem et mansuetudinem  [4'05]
18
Assumpta est Maria  [1'31]
19
Optimam partem elegit  [1'57]

In this latest volume from The Cardinall’s Musick acclaimed Byrd series, the composer’s overtly Catholic agenda is clearly displayed. In an age when censorship was rife and spies were everywhere, it is not surprising that possession of the first volume of Gradualia should have been cited as one of the reasons for the arrest of a Jesuit priest called de Noiriche (although obviously the spies had other more compelling evidence to hand). Only one set of the 1605 partbooks remains intact, although they have had their introductory material removed and perhaps these volumes were considered too dangerous to own. This fear, whether real or perceived, was not enough to dissuade Byrd and his publisher from producing a second book of Gradualia in 1607, or from re-printing both volumes in 1610.

All of the music on this disc is drawn from the first volume of Gradualia published in 1605. The music is a world away from the dark broodings of the Cantiones Sacrae from 1589 and 1591 where Byrd is preoccupied with the melancholy which dominates his middle years. In the later publications Byrd achieves a fusion of styles, mixing the energy, word-painting and rhythmic vitality of the secular madrigal tradition with the spirituality and liturgical context of words from the Mass and Divine Office. The witty use of short bursts of melody often thrown from one voice to another, together with the energized rhythmic cells, suggests a man who is not obsessed with a hopeless cause. It may be that in the Essex countryside, surrounded by sympathetic folk, Byrd had found a real home away from the political maelstrom which raged in London. These pieces show a glimpse of the man which is rather different to our more usual perception of the composer racked with misery at the deprivation of Catholics in England. Here we see a man in the later stages of life, affected by the aftermath of the Reformation (as his earlier publications clearly show), yet who is now sufficiently relaxed and secure to be able to indulge his considerable wit and imagination, and who is confident enough to use the most up-to-date musical styles. Here there is no wringing of hands, nor downcast eyes but rather the musical embodiment of an unshakeable faith.

Reviews

'Some of the three-part hymns are masterly in their technical assurance, setting the voices free to wander and with the lightness of touch recalling them to the fold for a cadence … exquisitely wrought … to the singers and their director is due an additional hymn of praise' (Gramophone)

'Some of Byrd's best writing, with complex imitation enlived by madrigal-style word settings. The Cardinall's Musick seize on the subtleties and expressiveness of these settings … the inventiveness and depth of this recording outweigh its rare longeurs' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Sublime music, then, an inspired and inspiring director and a series that Hyperion rescued from another label and has persevered with against all odds' (International Record Review)

'The Cardinall's Musick under Andrew Carwood show the deep feeling as well as the dignity of these illicit and originally secret settings' (The Independent on Sunday)

'The Cardinall's Musick continues its odyssey through Byrd's vocal output … the singing here is clean and balanced, with no attempt to make women's voices resemble those of boys' (The Sunday Times)

'Carwood has given us a series of Byrd recordings that will be a monument when he has finished, and this is a worthy part of the series… don’t wait to add this to our collection' (Fanfare, USA)

Other recommended albums

Josquin: The Tallis Scholars sing Josquin
CDGIM2062CDs for the price of 1
Łukaszewski: Choral Music
CDA67639
The two volumes entitled Gradualia, published in 1605 and 1607, are retrospective collections. Most of the music seems to date from during and after the 1590s when Byrd was resident in Essex at Stondon Massey as part of the extended Catholic community of Sir John Petre based around Ingatestone Hall. Many of the pieces are settings of texts which could well have been used during the clandestine celebrations of Mass and as such could be considered dangerous and subversive. Yet, for the purposes of publication these relatively short, Latin-texted pieces could easily be presented as spiritual entertainment for the home, innocent pieces, to be sung after supper perhaps, allowing one to exercise vocal, instrumental and linguistic skills. This is certainly how a Protestant household would have perceived them. It is remarkable therefore that Byrd seemed determined to sail close to the wind when he described exactly the nature of the music and how it should be used:

The Offices for the whole year which are appropriate to the principal Feasts of the Blessed Virgin Mary and of All Saints are set out for your use, together with some other songs for five voices with their words drawn from the fount of sacred writings. Here too is the Office for the Feast Day of Corpus Christi, together with the more solemn Antiphons of the same Blessed Virgin and other similar songs for four voices, and also all the hymns composed in praise of the Virgin. Finally, here are settings for three voices of various songs sung at the feast of Easter. Moreover, so that they may be placed in the correct position in the various parts of the Office, I have added a special index at the end of the book in which all the songs appropriate to the same Feasts will easily be found listed together, even though they may differ in the number of voices. (From the preface ‘To the True Lovers of Music’, Gradualia, 1605)

This is an overtly Catholic agenda and, in an age when censorship was rife and spies were everywhere, it is not surprising that possession of the first volume of Gradualia should have been cited as one of the reasons for the arrest of a Jesuit priest called de Noiriche (although obviously the spies had other more compelling evidence to hand). Only one set of the 1605 partbooks remains intact (now in York Minster Library and mentioned in William Byrd, Gentleman of the Chapel Royal by John Harley, Scolar Press, 1999), although they have had their introductory material removed and perhaps these volumes were considered too dangerous to own. This fear, whether real or perceived, was not enough to dissuade Byrd and his publisher from producing a second book of Gradualia in 1607, or from re-printing both volumes in 1610.

William Byrd’s early years are shrouded in mystery. It seems likely that he was from the London area but unlikely that he was a chorister at St Paul’s Cathedral (Edward Rimbault, inA Mass for five voices … preceded by a life of the composer. London Musical Antiquarian Society, 1 (1841), repeated various claims from Maria Hackett, the nineteenth-century reformer, concerning William Byrd and his early life, including that he was senior chorister at St Paul’s. There is no evidence for this. Byrd’s brothers—Symond and John—are listed as choristers but there is no mention of a William Byrd in the chorister lists). In any case, by the time the young Byrd was appointed organist of Lincoln Cathedral in 1563, he had undergone a rigorous musical training, had made the acquaintance of two of the most prominent mid-Tudor composers (John Sheppard and Thomas Tallis) and had been attached to the Chapel Royal in some capacity or other. Byrd’s faith shines out in his publications of 1575, 1589 and 1591, all in Latin, all published after his return to London, and all seemingly addressed to the dispossessed Catholic community in England. From the early 1590s Byrd moved away from London and into the orbit of the Petre family in Essex where he remained until his death in 1623.

All of the music on this disc is drawn from the first volume of Gradualia published in 1605 and dedicated to Henry Howard, Earl of Northampton. The music is a world away from the dark broodings of the Cantiones Sacrae from 1589 and 1591 where Byrd is preoccupied with the melancholy which dominates his middle years. In the later publications Byrd achieves a fusion of styles, mixing the energy, word-painting and rhythmic vitality of the secular madrigal tradition with the spirituality and liturgical context of words from the Mass and Divine Office. The witty use of short bursts of melody often thrown from one voice to another, together with the energized rhythmic cells, suggests a man who is not obsessed with a hopeless cause. It may be that in the Essex countryside, surrounded by sympathetic folk, Byrd had found a real home away from the political maelstrom which raged in London.

Byrd provides settings of the Propers at Mass, that is, those texts (Introit, Gradual, Tract or Alleluia, Offertory and Communion) which change from day to day according to the Feast being celebrated. He also provides some Antiphons (usually to accompany a central Canticle) and Hymns for Divine Office and some miscellanea which are spiritual in nature but which do not have a formal liturgical role. This disc features three sets of Mass Propers which celebrate salient moments in the life of the Virgin Mary—her Nativity (8 September), the Annunciation (25 March, nine months before Christmas) and the Assumption (15 August).

The Introits start with a strong sense of purpose befitting pieces which set the tone for the Mass and act as an overture to the action that will follow. Salve sancta parens has a vigorous upward melody and a quizzical alternation of B flat and B natural almost as if trying to represent the heavens (‘caelum’) with a sharpened note and the earth (‘terramque’) with a flat. The beautiful Gradual Benedicta et venerabilis cadences with a ravishing reminder of the text from the Creed (‘factus homo’) before stating the Alleluia which leads directly into the verse Felix es, sacra Virgo. In this recording, all Alleluias designed to be added during the season of Easter are included. This is not strictly correct according to liturgical rules, but it does allow for the complete performance of Byrd’s music as part of this recorded survey.

Vultum tuum is particularly notable for the explosion of joy at the words ‘in laetitia et exsultatione’ (‘in joy and exultation’). In spite of the fact that the Gradual and Tract are to be sung during Lent, Byrd takes the opportunity to use a rare triple-time section to describe the daughter of the king being brought to the temple. It is as if she runs with great excitement to the temple door only to smooth her dress and re-compose herself before entering the sacred space with a more sombre duple measure.

Byrd produces a vigorous setting for the Assumption Introit, fresh sounding and vibrant with a concentration on the joy displayed at Mary’s arrival in heaven. Once again, Byrd uses triple time to conclude his setting of the Gradual and Alleluia, this time to reiterate the final words of the verse (a rare occurrence) after which he resolutely remains in three until the very end of the movement. The Offertory verse Assumpta est Maria is most remarkable for its final Alleluia which must classed as one of the most imaginative settings of this word ever produced, whilst the Communion Optimam partem elegit is exquisite in every detail.

Completing this disc are the four Hymns from the Little Office of the Virgin presented in the order that they would be sung throughout the liturgical day—Quem terra, pontus, aethera (at Matins); O gloriosa Domina (at Lauds); Memento, salutis auctor (at the Lesser Hours); and Ave maris stella (at Vespers). The Little Office of the Virgin was a popular devotion from about the tenth century onwards. Like Divine Office, it is a collection of Psalms and Antiphons, readings and prayers, organized into seven services a day, the difference being that every text is in honour of the Virgin Mary. Although it was suppressed by Pius V in 1568 it remained popular, having been disseminated through many primers, or books of devotion, used by the laity. All four Hymns are scored for three voices and are therefore quite intimate examples of chamber music. Three of them are relatively simple in style: one, Ave maris stella, is a veritable tour de force. Byrd sets all seven verses of the Hymn using intricate melodies and complicated points of imitation. Furthermore, the fifth verse (‘Virgo singularis’) pushes the boundaries of the vocal ranges to the absolute limit.

The Salve regina is a setting of one of the most popular texts in honour of the Virgin. Byrd had already produced a more extended setting (published in 1591) but this later composition is more succinct and chamber-like. It contains some typical traits, like the downward semitones for ‘gementes et flentes’ (‘groaning and weeping’), but is on a much smaller canvas than the earlier version. Conversely Salve sola Dei genetrix is a very unusual text. Scored for three high voices with a low voice, it is a setting of an anonymous paraphrase of the Ave Maria text which is heavily influenced by madrigalian gestures and ideas, most notably at the words ‘nunc, et in extrema’ and ‘o ne morte relinquas’ where the use of rhetoric and harmony sounds closer to early Monteverdi than to Byrd himself.

This disc is the third in the series of Byrd’s Latin Church music which has been devoted exclusively to Gradualia items. These pieces show a glimpse of the man which is rather different to our more usual perception of the composer racked with misery at the deprivation of Catholics in England. Here we see a man in the later stages of life, affected by the aftermath of the Reformation (as his earlier publications clearly show), yet who is now sufficiently relaxed and secure to be able to indulge his considerable wit and imagination, and who is confident enough to use the most up-to-date musical styles. Here there is no wringing of hands, nor downcast eyes but rather the musical embodiment of an unshakeable faith.

Andrew Carwood © 2009

Les deux volumes de Gradualia publiés en 1605 et en 1607 sont des recueils rétrospectifs dont la plupart des pièces semblent dater des années 1590 et au-delà, quand Byrd résidait dans l’Essex, à Stondon Massey, et qu’il appartenait à la vaste communauté catholique de Sir John Petre établie autour d’Ingatestone Hall. Nombre des textes mis en musique étaient utilisables lors des messes clandestines et, en tant que tels, dangereux et subversifs. Cependant, pour les besoins de la publication, ces œuvres en latin, relativement courtes, pouvaient sans peine être présentées comme un divertissement spirituel à usage privé, d’innocentes pages à chanter, peut-être après le dîner, pour excercer ses talents vocaux, instrumentaux et linguistiques. Voilà comment une maison protestante les aurait certainement perçues. Mais, fait remarquable, Byrd tint, semble-t-il, à jouer un jeu dangereux en précisant la nature et l’utilisation de cette musique:

Les offices pour toute l’année appropriés aux principales fêtes de la sainte Vierge Marie et de tous les saints sont présentés pour votre usage, ainsi que d’autres chants à cinq voix, aux textes puisés à la source des écritures sacrées. Il y a également l’office pour la fête de Corpus Christi, ainsi que les antiennes davantage solennelles de la même sainte Vierge, d’autres chants similaires à quatre voix, et aussi toutes les hymnes composées à la louange de la Vierge. Enfin, il y a des mises en musique à trois voix de divers chants exécutés à la fête de Pâques. Par ailleurs, pour qu’ils puissent être correctement placés pendant les diverses parties de l’office, j’ai ajouté un index spécial à la fin du volume, dans lequel tous les chants appropriés aux mêmes fêtes seront faciles à trouver, répertoriés ensemble, même si leur nombre de voix diffère. (Extrait de la préface «To the True Lovers of Music», Gradualia, 1605.

Voilà un programme ouvertement catholique et, à une époque où la censure était chose commune et où les espions étaient partout, on ne s’étonnera guère que la possession du premier volume des Gradualia ait été citée parmi les motifs d’arrestation d’un prêtre jésuite nommé de Noiriche (même si, à l’évidence, les espions avaient des preuves bien plus convaincantes sous la main). Seul un jeu des parties séparées de 1605 demeure intact (conservé à la York Minster Library et mentionné par John Harley dans son William Byrd, Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, Scolar Press, 1999), encore que dépourvues de leur matériau introductif—peut-être la détention de ces volumes était-elle, elle aussi, considérée comme dangereuse. Cette crainte, qu’elle fût fondée ou non, ne suffit pas à dissuader Byrd et son éditeur de produire un second volume de Gradualia, en 1607, ni de réimprimer le tout en 1610.

Les premières années de William Byrd sont nimbées de mystère. Il naquit probablement dans la région de Londres mais ne fut pas, semble-t-il, choriste à la cathédrale Saint-Paul (Edward Rimbault, dans A Mass for five voices … preceded by a life of the composer. Musical Antiquarian Society de Londres, 1 (1841) reprit plusieurs allégations de Maria Hackett, la réformatrice du XIXe siècle, à propos de Byrd et du début de sa vie, notamment qu’il fut senior chorister à Saint-Paul. Mais rien ne le prouve. Les frères de Byrd, Symond et John, sont bien répertoriés en tant que choriste, mais aucune liste ne mentionne un William Byrd). Quoi qu’il en soit, le jeune Byrd qui fut nommé organiste de Lincoln Cathedral, en 1563, avait déjà suivi une rigoureuse formation musicale, fait la connaissance de deux des plus éminents compositeurs du milieu de la période Tudor (John Sheppard et Thomas Tallis) et occupé une fonction liée à la Chapel Royal. La foi de Byrd irradie ses publications de 1575, 1589 et 1591, toutes en latin, toutes parues après son retour à Londres et toutes apparemment adressées à la communauté catholique, dépossédée, d’Angleterre. Au début des années 1590, Byrd quitta Londres pour rejoindre le cercle de la famille Petre, dans l’Essex, où il demeura jusqu’à sa mort en 1623.

Toutes les œuvres de ce disque proviennent du premier volume de Gradualia paru en 1605 et dédié à Henry Howard, comte de Northampton. Cette musique est à des lieues des sombres ruminations des Cantiones Sacrae de 1589 et 1591, œuvre d’un Byrd tout à la mélancolie qui domina le milieu de sa vie. Dans ses publications ultérieures, le compositeur opéra une fusion stylistique entre d’une part l’énergie, le figuralisme et la vitalité rythmique de la tradition madrigalesque profane et d’autre part la spiritualité, le contexte liturgique des paroles de la messe et de l’office divin. L’usage, non sans esprit, de courts jaillissements mélodiques, souvent passés de voix en voix, mais aussi de cellules rythmiques bourrées d’énergie suggère un homme tout sauf obsédé par une cause désespérée. Il se peut que, dans la campagne de l’Essex, entouré de gens bienveillants, Byrd ait trouvé un vrai foyer, loin du maelström politique qui se déchaînait alors à Londres.

Byrd fournit les propres de la messe—ces textes (introït, graduel, trait ou alléluia, offertoire et communion) qui changent chaque jour, en fonction de la fête célébrée—, auxquels il ajoute des antiennes (souvent pour accompagner un cantique central), des hymnes pour l’office divin et diverses pièces de nature spirituelle mais sans rôle liturgique formel. Ce disque réunit trois corpus de propres de la messe célébrant des moments marquants de la vie de la Vierge Marie—sa naissance (8 septembre), l’Annonciation (25 mars, neuf mois avant Noël), et l’Assomption (15 août).

Les introïts commencent avec beaucoup de détermination, ce qui est parfait pour des pièces donnant le ton de la messe et servant d’ouverture à l’action qui va suivre. Salve sancta parens présente une vigoureuse mélodie ascendante et une curieuse alternance de si bémol et de si bécarre, comme pour tenter de représenter le ciel («caelum») par une note diésée et la terre («terramque») par un bémol. Le splendide graduel Benedicta et venerabilis cadence avec un ravissant rappel du texte du Credo («factus homo») avant d’énoncer l’Alléluia qui mène tout droit au verset Felix es, sacra Virgo. Cet enregistrement inclut tous les Alléluias conçus pour être ajoutés durant la saison pascale, ce qui, pour n’être pas strictement correct sur le plan liturgique, nous permet de graver toute la musique de Byrd.

Vultum tuum vaut surtout par l’explosion de joie aux mots «in laetitia et exsultatione» («dans la joie et l’exultation»). Bien que le graduel et le trait soient à chanter pendant le carême, Byrd saisit ici l’occasion d’utiliser une rare section ternaire pour décrire la fille du roi amenée au temple, un peu comme si elle courait, tout excitée, jusqu’à la porte du temple, mais pour aussitôt défroisser son vêtement et se ressaisir avant de pénétrer dans l’espace sacré avec une mesure binaire, plus austère.

Pour l’introït de l’Assomption, frais et vibrant, Byrd produit une vigoureuse mise en musique centrée sur les manifestations de joie à l’arrivée de Marie au ciel. Là encore, Byrd conclut son graduel et son Alléluia sur une mesure ternaire, cette fois pour réitérer les derniers mots du verset (chose rare), après quoi il demeure ternaire jusqu’à la toute fin du mouvement. Le verset de l’offertoire Assumpta est Maria vaut surtout par son Alléluia final, à ranger parmi les plus inventifs jamais écrits, cependant que l’Optimam partem elegit de la communion est exquis dans ses moindres détails.

Pour compléter ce disque, les quatre hymnes de Petit office sont présentées dans leur ordre d’exécution au fil de la journée liturgique: Quem terra, pontus, aethera (matines); O gloriosa Domina (laudes); Memento, salutis auctor (petites heures) et Ave maris stella (vêpres). Le Petit office était une dévotion populaire apparue vers le Xe siècle. Comme l’Office divin, c’est un ensemble de psaumes et d’antiennes, de lectures et de prières organisé en sept services quotidiens, à ceci près que tous les textes honorent la Vierge Marie. Malgré sa suppression par Pie V, en 1568, cet office demeura populaire, diffusé par maints primers (livres de dévotion) utilisés par les laïcs. Les quatre hymnes sont écrites à trois voix, ce qui en fait des exemples fort intimes de musique de chambre. Trois d’entre elles présentent un style relativement simple, Ave maris stella étant, elle, un véritable tour de force. Byrd en met en musique les sept versets à l’aide de mélodies élaborées et de complexes passages en imitation. Par ailleurs, le cinquième verset («Virgo singularis») repousse à leur absolue limite les frontières des étendues vocales.

Le Salve regina met en musique l’un des plus populaires textes en l’honneur de la Vierge. Byrd en avait déjà produit un plus vaste (publié en 1591); celui-ci est plus succinct, plus façon chambre, et présente un canevas bien plus modeste, même s’il renferme aussi certains traits typiques, comme les demi-tons descendants pour «gementes et flentes» («gémissant et pleurant»). Salve sola Dei genetrix, une hymne écrite pour trois voix aiguës et une basse, a, en revanche, un texte fort inhabituel puisqu’il s’agit d’une paraphrase anonyme de l’Ave Maria; l’influence des idées madrigalesques s’y fait profondément sentir, surtout aux mots «nunc, et in extrema» et «o ne morte relinquas», où l’usage de la rhétorique et de l’harmonie s’approche plus du premier Monteverdi que de Byrd lui-même.

Ce disque est le troisième de la série des pièces liturgiques latines de Byrd à être consacré aux seules Gradualia, lesquelles nous laissent entrevoir un homme assez différent de son image habituelle de compositeur rongé de souffrances face aux privations des catholiques en Angleterre. Nous découvrons ici un homme vieillissant, affecté par le contrecoup de la Réforme (comme le montrent bien ses publications antérieures), mais désormais assez détendu et rassuré pour laisser libre cours à son immense verve et à son imagination, un homme assez confiant, aussi, pour recourir aux plus récents styles musicaux. Ici, nulles mains moites, nuls regards baissés, mais l’incarnation musicale d’une foi inébranlable.

Andrew Carwood © 2009
Français: Hypérion

Die beiden Bände mit dem Titel Gradualia, die 1605 und 1607 herausgegeben wurden, sind retrospektive Sammlungen. Die meisten Werke scheinen in den 90er Jahren des 16. Jahrhunderts und danach entstanden zu sein, als Byrd in Stondon Massey in der Grafschaft Essex als Mitglied der größeren katholischen Gemeinde um Sir John Petre bei Ingatestone Hall lebte. Viele Stücke sind Vertonungen von Texten, die sich gut für heimliche Messfeiern geeignet hätten; als solche hätten sie als gefährlich und subversiv eingeschätzt werden können. Für die Herausgabe dieser relativ kurzen, lateinischen Stücke jedoch hätten sie ohne weiteres als erbauliche, geistliche Werke für den Hausgebrauch präsentiert werden können, als harmlose Stücke, die zum Beispiel nach dem Abendbrot gesungen werden konnten, um stimmliche, instrumentale und sprachliche Fertigkeiten weiterzubilden. Ein protestantischer Haushalt hätte sie sicherlich so wahrgenommen. Es ist daher bemerkenswert, dass Byrd anscheinend dazu entschlossen war, sich hart an der Grenze des Erlaubten zu bewegen, denn er beschrieb den Charakter und den Zweck der Stücke genau:

Die Offizien des gesamten Jahres, die für die Hauptfesttage der Heiligen Jungfrau Maria und Allerheiligen angemessen sind, sind hier zusammen mit einigen anderen Liedern für fünf Stimmen, deren Worte aus der Quelle geistlicher Texte stammen, für Ihren Gebrauch dargelegt. Es befindet sich hier ebenso das Offizium für Fronleichnam, zusammen mit den festlicheren Antiphonen derselben Heiligen Jungfrau und anderen ähnlichen Liedern zu vier Stimmen, und auch alle Loblieder der Jungfrau. Schließlich liegen hier Vertonungen für drei Stimmen von verschiedenen Liedern vor, die zum Osterfest gesungen werden. Ich habe außerdem—so dass sie an die richtige Stelle in verschiedenen Teilen des Offiziums gestellt werden mögen—am Ende des Buches einen besonderen Index gestellt, in dem alle Lieder der jeweiligen Feste aufgeführt sind, so dass sie einfach alle beieinander gefunden werden können, selbst wenn sie sich in der Anzahl der Stimmen unterscheiden. (Aus dem Vorwort „To the True Lovers of Music“, Gradualia, 1605)

Es ist dies ein offensichtlich katholisches Programm und daher—zu einer Zeit, als die Zensur weit verbreitet war und überall Spione lauerten—ist es nicht weiter überraschend, dass der Besitz des ersten Bandes der Gradualia als einer der Gründe für die Festnahme eines Jesuitenpaters namens de Noiriche aufgeführt wurde (obwohl die Spione offensichtlich noch stärkere Beweise zur Hand hatten). Lediglich ein Satz der Stimmbücher von 1605 ist intakt überliefert (eine Kopie befindet sich heute in der York Minster Library und wird auch in William Byrd, Gentleman of the Chapel Royal von John Harley, Scolar Press, 1999, genannt), obwohl hier die Einleitung beseitigt wurde—möglicherweise galt es als zu gefährlich, diese Bände zu besitzen. Diese Gefahr jedoch, ob sie echt war oder nur als solche wahrgenommen wurde, brachte Byrd und seinen Verleger nicht davon ab, 1607 ein zweites Buch mit Gradualia herauszubringen und 1610 beide Bände noch einmal aufzulegen.

Die frühen Jahre William Byrds sind geheimnisumwoben. Wahrscheinlich stammte er aus London oder der Nähe Londons, doch ist es unwahrscheinlich, dass er an der St Paul’s Cathedral Chorknabe war (Edward Rimbault, in A Mass for five voices … preceded by a life of the composer. London Musical Antiquarian Society, 1, 1841, wiederholte diverse Behauptungen von Maria Hackett, einer Reformatorin des 19. Jahrhunderts, bezüglich der Jugend William Byrds, unter anderem, dass er ein Oberstufen-Chorknabe an St Paul’s gewesen sein soll. Es liegen jedoch keine Beweise dafür vor. Byrds Brüder, Symond und John, sind als Chorknaben in den entsprechenden Listen aufgeführt, von einem William Byrd ist dort jedoch nicht die Rede). Wie dem auch sei, als der junge Byrd 1563 als Organist der Kathedrale zu Lincoln angestellt wurde, hatte er eine gründliche musikalische Ausbildung hinter sich, zwei der wichtigsten Komponisten der mittleren Tudorzeit kennengelernt (John Sheppard und Thomas Tallis) und war in der einen oder anderen Funktion mit der Chapel Royal verbunden. Byrds Glaube schimmert in seinen Veröffentlichungen von 1575, 1589 und 1591 durch, die alle in lateinischer Sprache verfasst, nach seiner Rückkehr nach London publiziert und offenbar an die enteignete katholische Gemeinschaft Englands gerichtet sind. Anfang der 1590er Jahre zog Byrd aus London weg und in die Nähe der Familie Petre in Essex, wo er bis zu seinem Tod im Jahre 1623 bleiben sollte.

Sämtliche Werke der vorliegenden Aufnahme stammen aus dem ersten Band der Gradualia, der 1605 herausgegeben wurde und dem Grafen von Northampton, Henry Howard, gewidmet ist. Die Musik ist weit entfernt von den düsteren und grüblerischen Cantiones Sacrae von 1589 und 1591, wo Byrd mit der Melancholie beschäftigt ist, die in seiner mittleren Schaffensperiode vorherrschte. In den späteren Publikationen gelingt Byrd eine Verschmelzung verschiedener Stile, wo Energie, Wortmalerei und die rhythmische Vitalität der weltlichen Madrigaltradition mit dem geistlichen und liturgischen Gehalt der Texte der Messe und des Heiligen Offiziums verbunden werden. Der geistreiche Einsatz von kurzen Melodie-Impulsen, die oft von einer Stimme zur nächsten gereicht werden, sowie die energetischen rhythmischen Zellen erzeugen den Eindruck, dass Byrd sich nicht in ein aussichtloses Vorhaben verrannt hatte. Vielleicht hatte er auf dem Lande in Essex, inmitten verständnisvoller Menschen, eine richtige Heimat gefunden, weit weg von dem politischen Wirbel, der in London wütete.

Byrd stellt Vertonungen des Messepropriums, das heißt die Texte (Introitus, Graduale, Tractus oder Alleluia, Offertorium und Communio), die sich von Tag zu Tag ändern (je nachdem, welches Fest gefeiert wird) bereit. Er fügt auch einige Antiphonen hinzu (die zumeist zusammen mit einem zentralen Canticum erklingen), sowie Hymnen für das Heilige Offizium und einige vermischte Kompositionen, die zwar geistlicher Natur sind, jedoch keine direkte Funktion im Gottesdienst haben. Auf der vorliegenden CD befinden sich drei Messepropria, in denen wichtige Momente im Leben der Jungfrau Maria gefeiert werden: ihre Geburt (8. September), die Verkündigung (25. März, neun Monate vor Weihnachten) und Himmelfahrt (15. August).

Die Introitus-Vertonungen beginnen auf zielstrebige Art und Weise, wie es sich für Stücke gehört, die den Ton für die Messe angeben und als Ouvertüren zu den darauffolgenden Ereignissen fungieren. Das Salve sancta parens hat eine energische, aufwärts gerichtete Melodie und ein kurioses Alternieren zwischen B und H, als ob der Himmel („caelum“) mit einer erhöhten Note und die Erde („terramque“) mit einer erniedrigten Note dargestellt werden soll. Das wunderschöne Graduale Benedicta et venerabilis kadenziert mit einer hinreißenden Erinnerung an den Text des Credo („factus homo“), bevor das Alleluia einsetzt, das dann direkt in den Vers Felix es, sacra Virgo hinüberleitet. Auf dieser Aufnahme liegen sämtliche Alleluias vor, die für die Osterzeit vorgesehen sind. Zwar ist das den liturgischen Regeln zufolge nicht ganz korrekt, doch konnte so eine Gesamteinspielung der Werke Byrds entstehen.

Das Vultum tuum ist aufgrund des Freudenausbruchs bei den Worten „in laetitia et exsultatione“ („mit Fröhlichkeit und Jubel“) besonders bemerkenswert. Trotz der Tatsache, dass das Graduale und der Tractus während der Fastenzeit gesungen werden sollen, ergreift Byrd hier die Gelegenheit und stellt die Szene, in der die Königstochter in den Tempel gebracht wird, mit einer ungewöhnlichen Dreiertakt-Passage dar. Es klingt, als würde sie in großer Aufregung zur Tempeltür rennen und dann, eben angekommen, ihr Kleid glattstreichen und sich fassen, bevor sie in den sakralen Raum in einem etwas düsteren Zweiertakt eintritt.

Byrd komponiert ein energisches Stück als Himmelfahrts-Introitus, das frisch klingt und vor Freude über Marias Ankunft im Himmel regelrecht pulsiert. Hier setzt Byrd wiederum einen Dreierrhythmus ein, um seine Vertonung des Graduale und Alleluia zu beenden, wiederholt jedoch, was sehr selten vorkommt, die letzten Worte des Verses noch einmal; danach behält er ganz deutlich bis zum Ende des Satzes den Dreiertakt bei. Die Offertoriumsdichtung Assumpta est Maria sticht besonders aufgrund ihres abschließenden Alleluias heraus, das sicherlich eine der phantasievollsten Vertonungen dieses Wortes überhaupt ist; das Optimam partem elegit der Communio ist in jedem Detail exquisit.

Am Ende der vorliegenden Aufnahme stehen die vier Hymnen aus dem Officium parvum beatae Mariae virginis, die entsprechend der Reihenfolge angeordnet sind, in der sie im Laufe des liturgischen Tages gesungen wurden—Quem terra, pontus, aethera (Matutin), O gloriosa Domina (Laudes), Memento, salutis auctor (mittlere Horen) und Ave maris stella (Vesper). Das Officium parvum beatae Mariae virginis war ab dem 10. Jahrhundert eine beliebte Andacht. Ebenso wie beim Officium divinum handelt es sich beim Officium parvum um eine Sammlung von Psalmen und Antiphonen, Lesungen und Gebeten, die auf sieben Gottesdienste pro Tag verteilt sind mit der Besonderheit, dass alle Texte der Jungfrau Maria gewidmet sind. Obwohl es 1568 von Pius V. abgeschafft wurde, büßte es nicht an Popularität ein, da es durch diverse Gebetbücher, die von den Laien genutzt wurden, verbreitet worden war. Alle vier Hymnen sind dreistimmig angelegt, also dem Charakter nach intime Kammermusik. Stilistisch gesehen sind drei der vier eher schlicht gehalten, doch ein Stück, Ave maris stella, ist eine wahrhaftige Meisterleistung. Byrd vertont alle sieben Strophen des Hymnus mit verschlungenen Melodien und komplizierter Imitationstechnik. Zudem werden in der fünften Strophe („Virgo singularis“) die Stimmumfänge aufs äußerste ausgedehnt.

Das Salve regina ist eine Vertonung eines der beliebtesten Texte zu Ehren der Heiligen Jungfrau. Byrd hatte bereits eine längere Vertonung komponiert (1591 herausgegeben), doch dieses spätere Werk ist präziser und kammermusikalisch angelegt. Es kommen darin einige typische Charakteristika vor, wie etwa abwärts gerichtete Halbtöne bei „gementes et flentes“ („trauernd und weinend“), doch ist dieses Werk deutlich kleiner gehalten als das vorangehende. Umgekehrt ist das Salve sola Dei genetrix ein ausgesprochen ungewöhnlicher Text. Das Werk ist für drei hohe Stimmen und Bassstimme angelegt und ist eine Vertonung einer anonymen Paraphrase des Ave Maria-Texts und weist deutlich gewisse madrigalische Gesten auf, insbesondere bei den Worten „nunc, et in extrema“ und „o ne morte relinquas“, wo der Einsatz von Rhetorik und Harmonie eher nach einem frühen Monteverdi klingt als nach Byrd selbst.

Die vorliegende CD ist die dritte in der Reihe der lateinischen Kirchenmusik Byrds, die sich ausschließlich auf Gradualia-Stücke konzentriert. Diese Stücke geben uns einen flüchtigen Eindruck eines Mannes, der sich von dem üblicheren Bild des vom Elend der englischen Katholiken geplagten Komponisten merklich unterscheidet. Hier haben wir es mit einem Mann im fortgeschritteneren Alter zu tun, der zwar von den Auswirkungen der Reformation betroffen war (wie seine früheren Publikationen deutlich zeigen), der sich jedoch später in einer genügend entspannten und sicheren Position befand, dass er seinem Esprit und seiner Phantasie freien Lauf gewähren konnte. Außerdem war er selbstbewusst genug, die modernsten musikalischen Stile zu verwenden. Hier gibt es kein Händeringen und es werden auch nicht die Augen auf den Boden gerichtet, sondern es drückt sich hier musikalisch ein unerschütterlicher Glaube aus.

Andrew Carwood © 2009
Deutsch: Viola Scheffel

Other albums in this series

Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...
Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.