Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Robert Schumann (1810-1856)

Music for cello & piano

Steven Isserlis (cello), Dénes Várjon (piano)
Recording details: June 2008
Henry Wood Hall, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Andrew Keener
Engineered by Simon Eadon
Release date: March 2009
Total duration: 69 minutes 46 seconds

Cover artwork: The Flight into Egypt (detail) (1609) by Adam Elsheimer (1578-1610)
 
Soiréestücke 'Fantasiestücke' Op 73  [11'24]
1
2
Lebhaft, leicht  [3'09]
3
Adagio and Allegro for cello and piano Op 70  [8'53]
4
Adagio  [4'17]
5
Allegro  [4'36]
Violin Sonata No 3 in A minor WoO27  [19'58]  arr. Steven Isserlis (b1959)
6
7
Scherzo: Lebhaft  [3'12]
8
9
10
Abendlied  [3'04]
Romanzen for cello and piano Op 94  [11'04]
11
Nicht schnell  [3'10]
12
13
Nicht schnell  [4'04]
Fünf Stücke im Volkston Op 102  [15'23]
14
15
Langsam  [3'37]
16
17
Nicht zu rasch  [1'47]
18

‘There is no composer to whom I feel closer than to Schumann. He has been a beloved friend since I was a child; I remain as fascinated today as I was then by his unique blend of poetry, ecstatic strength and confessional intimacy.’

Steven Isserlis’s own words give the background to this fascinating disc.

Schumann’s affection for the cello ran deep. It was an instrument he had played in his youth, and considered taking up again when, at the age of twenty-two, an accident to his hand forced him to relinquish his dream of being a virtuoso pianist. ‘I want to take up the violoncello again (one needs only the left hand for this) and it will be very useful to me in composing symphonies’, he wrote to his mother. The sound of the cello played without the right hand would have been somewhat minimalist; but his love for the instrument is clearly demonstrated by the cello parts in all four of his symphonies, as well as in the concertos for piano and violin, and of course throughout his chamber music. As the great musicologist Donald Francis Tovey put it: ‘The qualities of the violoncello are exactly those of the beloved dreamer whom we know as Schumann.’

Awards

GRAMOPHONE EDITOR'S CHOICE
BBC MUSIC MAGAZINE INSTRUMENTAL CHOICE

Reviews

'A disc that all Schumann lovers will want to own' (BBC Radio 3 CD Review)

'Could this be his best recording yet? … [Fantasiestucke] has a wonderfully considered and luxuriant aspect; the results never sound contrived. That's partly to do with Isserlis's sound, which has a very focused centre to it, but also his utterly intimate relationship with pianist Dénes Várjon. Perhaps the most ravishing item on the disc is the poignant Abendlied … in his hands it's as moving a wordless Lied as anything you could imagine … for all that Isserlis has made many wonderful recordings, not least his seminal Bach suites, I think this might just be his finest yet' (Gramophone)

'This fabulously virtuosic and psychologically complex work [Violin Sonata] forces Isserlis's musicianship up to a new level … Isserlis masters its explosive flourishes and has the vital impetus to manke an eccentric work feel whole' (BBC Music Magazine)

'This music sings and soars, flying to the instrument's highest reaches with dreamy eloquence and a sense of rightness … he plays with fierceness and soul' (The Observer)

'Enhanced by glowingly intimate sound from Andrew Keener and Simon Eadon, Isserlis constantly draws us in with playing of gentle radiance and exquisite nuancing … [Violin Sonata] sets the seal on one of Isserlis's finest discs' (International Record Review)

'The whole programme is a delight, as both artists catch the music's poetic ebb and flow to perfection' (The Sunday Times)

Other recommended albums

Brahms: The Three Violin Sonatas
CDH55087
Elgar: Piano Quintet & Violin Sonata
CDH55301
Liadov: Marionettes, A Musical Snuffbox & other piano music
CDH55309
Schubert: String Quintet & String Trio
CDH55305
Wassenaer: Concerti Armonici
CDH55155
Schumann’s affection for the cello ran deep. It was an instrument he had played in his youth, and considered taking up again when, at the age of twenty-two, an accident to his hand forced him to relinquish his dream of being a virtuoso pianist. ‘I want to take up the violoncello again (one needs only the left hand for this) and it will be very useful to me in composing symphonies’, he wrote to his mother. The sound of the cello played without the right hand would have been somewhat minimalist; but his love for the instrument is clearly demonstrated by the cello parts in all four of his symphonies, as well as in the concertos for piano and violin, and of course throughout his chamber music. As the great musicologist Donald Francis Tovey put it: ‘The qualities of the violoncello are exactly those of the beloved dreamer whom we know as Schumann.’

It is a pity, then, that the only works in Schumann’s catalogue originally conceived for solo cello are his wonderful Concerto of 1850, the five Romances of 1853 (almost his last work, destroyed some forty years after their composition by his widow Clara), and the Stücke im Volkston (‘Pieces in folk style’) that conclude this disc. Fortunately, though, Schumann took pity on cellists to the extent of permitting the performance on cello of his Fantasiestücke Op 73, for clarinet, and the Adagio and Allegro Op 70, originally for horn; and surely he would have had no objection to the Romances for oboe, Op 94, being played an octave lower.

Four of the works on this programme date from 1849: the Fantasiestücke and Adagio and Allegro (both from February), the Stücke im Volkston (April) and the Romances (December)—all of them written in Schumann’s customary inspired haste, each completed within a few days. Germany was in turmoil at that time, the revolution against the monarchies that had begun a year earlier spreading across the country in a perilous sheet of flame. The Schumanns, then living in Dresden, were in danger; in May, Republican soldiers came looking for Robert in order to enlist him. He hid, subsequently fleeing with Clara and their eldest daughter to a nearby haven; two days later, Clara—six months pregnant—returned to Dresden in the middle of the night, snatched the remaining three children from their beds and made a dramatic escape. Writing to a friend from his place of sanctuary, Schumann reflected: ‘For some time now I’ve been very busy … it seemed as if the outer storms impelled people to turn inward, and only there did I find a counterforce against the forces breaking in so frightfully from outside’. So typical of Schumann—one gets the feeling that for him the outer world was always something of a threat; he preferred to live within his dreams.

A note on cellos
Probably a fair definition of a spoilt brat is a cellist who has access to two Stradivari cellos. At the time of this recording, I was in that rather unbelievable position, The Nippon Music Foundation of Japan having lent me the De Munck (or Feuermann) Stradivarius of 1730, while the Royal Academy of Music in London allowed me to use the Marquis de Corberon (or Nelsova) Strad of 1726. I am hugely grateful to both institutions for their kindness. In the event, I took along both cellos to the sessions, and decided on the spur of the moment which to use for which piece (ending up dividing the honours fairly evenly). I leave it to the (very) sharp-eared listener to discern which cello can be heard on which track!

Steven Isserlis © 2009

Schumann aimait profondément le violoncelle, un instrument dont il avait joué dans sa jeunesse et auquel il envisagea de se remettre à vingt-deux ans, après qu’un accident à la main l’eut contraint à abandonner son rêve de pianiste virtuose. «Je veux me remettre au violoncelle (seule la main gauche est nécessaire) et cela me sera très utile pour composer des symphonies», écrivit-il à sa mère. Joué sans la main droite, le violoncelle devait sonner un rien minimaliste, mais cela n’empêcha pas Schumann de faire clairement passer son amour de l’instrument dans les parties violoncellistiques de ses quatre symphonies, dans ses concertos pour piano et violon et, bien sûr, dans toute sa musique de chambre. «Les qualités du violoncelle sont exactement celles de ce cher rêveur que nous appelons Schumann», dira le grand musicologue Donald Francis Tovey.

On peut donc déplorer que Schumann n’ait vraiment dédié au violoncelle que son merveilleux Concerto de 1850, ses cinq Romances de 1853 (presque ses dernières pièces, détruites quelque quarante ans plus tard par sa veuve Clara) et les Stücke im Volkston («Morceaux en style populaire») qui closent ce disque. Par bonheur, cependant, il eut à ce point pitié des violoncellistes qu’il les laissa interpréter ses Fantasiestücke op. 73 pour clarinette et son Adagio et Allegro op. 70 pour cor; et il ne se serait sûrement pas opposé à ce qu’ils jouent aussi, à l’octave inférieure, ses Romances pour hautbois op. 94.

Quatre des œuvres de ce programme datent de 1849: les Fantasiestücke et l’Adagio et Allegro (février), les Stücke im Volkston (avril) et les Romances (décembre)—chacune écrite par Schumann dans sa coutumière hâte inspirée, en quelques jours. L’Allemagne était alors en effervescence, la révolution contre les monarchies qui avait démarré un an plus tôt gagnant le pays dans une fâcheuse traînée de poudre. Les Schumann, qui vivaient alors à Dresde, étaient en danger: en mai, des soldats républicains vinrent demander après Robert, pour l’enrôler. Il se cacha, puis s’enfuit non loin avec Clara et leur fille aînée, dans un abri; deux jours plus tard, Clara, alors enceinte de six mois, retourna à Dresde en pleine nuit, tira doucement leurs trois autres enfants du lit et entreprit une spectaculaire évasion. Écrivant à un ami depuis son refuge, Schumann se fit cette réflexion: «Ces derniers temps, j’ai été très occupé … c’était comme si les tempêtes extérieures poussaient les gens à se tourner vers l’intérieur, et ce fut seulement là que je trouvai une force capable de contrer les forces faisant une si fracassante irruption du dehors.» Voilà bien Schumann—on a le sentiment que, pour lui, le monde extérieur était toujours un peu comme une menace; il préférait vivre dans ses rêves.

Steven Isserlis © 2009
Français: Hypérion

Schumann liebte das Cello sehr. Es war ein Instrument, das er in seiner Jugend gespielt hatte, und als er im Alter von 22 Jahren nach einer Verletzung seiner Hand seine Pläne, Konzertpianist zu werden, aufgeben musste, überlegte er sich, dieses Instrument wieder aufzugreifen. Er schrieb an seine Mutter, dass man dafür nur die linke Hand bräuchte und es für die Komposition von Symphonien nützlich wäre. Der Klang des Cellos ohne die rechte Hand wäre etwas minimalistisch, aber seine Liebe für das Instrument demonstriert sich deutlich in den Cellostimmen in all seinen vier Symphonien sowie seinem Klavier- und Violinkonzert und natürlich durchweg in seiner Kammermusik. Wie es der große Musikwissenschaftler Donald Francis Tovey ausdrückte: „Die Qualitäten des Violoncellos sind genau die gleichen wie die des geliebten Träumers, den wir als Schumann kennen.“

Daher ist es schade, dass die einzigen original für Solocello konzipierten Werke in Schumanns Katalog, sein wunderbares Konzert von 1850, die fünf Romanzen von 1853 (nahezu sein letztes Werk und etwa vierzig Jahre nach ihrer Komposition von seiner Witwe Clara vernichtet) und die Stücke im Volkston sind, mit denen diese CD schließt. Glücklicherweise hatte Schumann mit den armen Cellisten Mitleid und erlaubte ihnen, seine Fantasiestücke op. 73 für Klarinette und das Adagio und Allegro op. 70, original für Horn, auf dem Cello zu spielen, und er hätte wohl kaum Einwände gehabt, die Romanzen für Oboe op. 94 eine Oktave tiefer zu spielen.

Vier der Werke in diesem Programm datieren von 1849: die Fantasiestücke und Adagio und Allegro (beide vom Februar), die Stücke im Volkston (April) und die Romanzen (Dezember)—die Schumann allesamt in seiner üblichen inspirierter Eile schrieb und jeweils innerhalb weniger Tage vollendete. Deutschland war damals im Aufruhr: die ein Jahr zuvor begonnene Revolution gegen die Monarchien flammte gefährlich durch das Land. Die Schumanns, wohnten damals in Dresden und waren in Gefahr: im Mai hatten republikanische Soldaten Robert gesucht, um ihn zum Militär einzuziehen. Er versteckte sich und floh später mit Clara und ihrer ältesten Tochter zu einer nahegelegenen Zufluchtsstätte; zwei Tage später kehrte die sechs Monate schwangere Clara mitten in der Nacht nach Dresden zurück und holte für eine dramatische Flucht die anderen drei Kinder aus dem Bett. Schumann schrieb aus seinem Zufluchtsort an einen Freund, dass er seit einiger Zeit viel zu tun hatte und es schiene, als ob äußere Stürme die Menschen antrieben, sich nach innen zu wenden, und dass er erst dort ein Gegengewicht gegen die Kräfte gefunden hätte, die so fürchterlich von außen hereinbrächen. So typisch für Schumann—man bekommt das Gefühl, dass die Außenwelt für ihn immer etwas bedrohlich war; er lebte lieber in seinen Träumen.

Steven Isserlis © 2009
Deutsch: Renate Wendel

Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.