Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Anton Rubinstein (1829-1894)

Cello Sonatas

Jiří Bárta (cello), Hamish Milne (piano)
Recording details: January 2008
Potton Hall, Dunwich, Suffolk, United Kingdom
Produced by Andrew Keener
Engineered by Simon Eadon
Release date: April 2009
Total duration: 70 minutes 33 seconds

Cover artwork: Dushenka in Flight (1808) by Fedor Petrovich Tolstoy (1783-1873)
Hermitage, St Petersburg, Russia / Bridgeman Art Library, London
 
Cello Sonata No 1 in D major Op 18  [28'41]
1
Allegro moderato  [11'55]
2
Moderato assai  [6'56]
3
Moderato  [9'50]
Cello Sonata No 2 in G major Op 39  [41'52]
4
Allegro  [12'41]
5
Allegretto  [7'49]
6
Andante  [9'16]
7
Moderato  [12'06]

Remembered today principally as one of the greatest of all nineteenth-century piano virtuosos, Rubinstein was also a celebrated composer in his day who produced a large number of works with an enviable ease and fluency. His two Cello Sonatas are recorded here by Czech cellist Jirí Bárta and Romantic specialist Hamish Milne on a thoroughly enjoyable new disc.

Rubinstein was only in his early twenties when he composed the Cello Sonata No 1 in D major Op 18 in 1852, but it is a fairly substantial work which not unnaturally requires a pianist of heroic stature as well as a first-rate cellist. If Rubinstein’s idiom is more reminiscent of Mendelssohn than Russian folk-melody, he still contrives to sound a personal note with touches of Slavic ardour. The Cello Sonata No 2 in G major Op 39 was composed in 1857, though Rubinstein revised it some years later. This is a larger, more ambitious conception than the D major sonata, with a true scherzo and slow movement as well as sonata-form first movement and finale. In fact, though the sonata-form outlines of the first movement are clear, the movement has fantasia-like aspects, developing episodes that concentrate on one motif or another, and with cadenza-like effusions for the two instruments at different times. The cello’s opening theme is generously long-spanned, almost Brahmsian.

The repertoire of nineteenth-century cello music is rich, but not so extensive that these two sonatas by Rubinstein should continue to be so neglected. They are both delightful works, and the second sonata especially deserves a regular place in recital programmes.

Reviews

'These two lavishly inventive and free-flowing cello sonatas reveal how sorely underestimated Rubinstein's legacy has been. They are more than equivalent to the cello sonatas of Chopin, Mendelssohn and Rachmaninov … in Jiří Bárta's hands it speaks to us across the centuries with a radiant ardour' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Two cello sonatas [Rubinstein's] are undeniably beautiful and are played with much expertise by these fine players' (American Record Guide)

'Bárta and Milne produce glorious readings of both works, each seeming to relish the sonorities he is producing, Bárta spinning effortless arches of sound and Milne managing to combine warmth and detail. The Hyperion recording is sensitive and truthful … warmly recommended' (International Record Review)

'Performances of rare precision, fluency, and Romantic warmth' (Fanfare, USA)

Other recommended albums

Smörgasbord
CDA67184
Walter & Goldmark: Violin Sonatas
CDA67220
Bach: The Four Orchestral Suites
CDD220022CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)
Boccherini: Flute Quintets Op 19
CDA67646
Ernst: Violin Music
CDA67619
Best-known in his lifetime as one of the great piano virtuosos of the nineteenth century, but also a composer, conductor, teacher and administrator, Anton Rubinstein was born in the village of Vikhvatnets, in Bessarabia, to a Jewish family of German-Polish origin. His father was a prosperous merchant, and the family were baptized as Christians when Anton was two years old. Three years later they moved to Moscow. A Wunderkind as a pianist—as was his younger brother Nikolai—he began playing in public at the age of nine. His reputation grew so swiftly that his Paris debut in 1841 was attended by Liszt, Chopin, Kalkbrenner and Meyerbeer, and subsequently he became a piano pupil of Liszt. From 1844, encouraged by Mendelssohn and Meyerbeer, he studied composition in Berlin under Siegfried Dehn (who had also taught Glinka), and returned to Russia in 1848 as chamber virtuoso to the Grand Duchess Helena Pavlovna, sister-in-law of the Tsar. In the 1850s Rubinstein travelled widely in Western Europe and was well known to the Schumanns and Brahms as well as to the Liszt circle. In 1858 he was appointed Imperial Concert Director in St Petersburg, with a lifetime pension. As such, in 1862 he founded the St Petersburg Conservatory and until 1867 was its first Director. Thereafter, apart from a punishing schedule of composition, he returned to the career of itinerant international virtuoso. As a pianist Rubinstein had an enormous repertoire and immense stamina—for example, during a nine-month tour in the USA with the violinist Wieniawski in 1872–3 he gave 215 recitals spanning all the major American cities. He returned to Russia and taught again at the Conservatory in the late 1880s, but in 1891 moved to Dresden. His health was failing, however, and he spent his last year on his estate near St Petersburg, on the shores of the Baltic, where he died in November 1894 a few days short of his sixty-fifth birthday.

Rubinstein’s training in composition had been in the Germanic tradition, and he was always associated with the more ‘Western-leaning’ wing of nineteenth-century Russian music. He was also tremendously prolific, writing operas, oratorios, symphonies and concertos, plus a great deal of chamber and piano music and many songs. Although he was viewed as an important composer in his lifetime, for many years his only work to achieve lasting posthumous fame was the comparatively minor Melody in F, and only a fraction of his output of nearly 200 works is known today. He is often viewed as a musician who was betrayed by his very facility: composition came easily to him, and Brahms, who liked and respected Rubinstein as a man and as a performer, complained that he never took enough trouble over his works. Nevertheless such pieces as the Fourth Piano Concerto, the Second (‘Ocean’) Symphony, the collection of 24 ‘musical portraits’ for piano entitled Kamenniy-Ostrov and the opera The Demon show that Rubinstein was capable of making the requisite creative effort, and these works have clung to the fringes of the repertoire. They testify to a highly accomplished composer who was equally at home in the salon and the concert hall, and whose creative devotion to his native country, even if not especially indebted to Russian folk music, was profound.

The same can certainly be said of his two impressive sonatas for cello and piano. Both belong to his first period of European wandering in the 1850s. Rubinstein was only in his early twenties when he composed the Cello Sonata No 1 in D major Op 18 in 1852, but it is a fairly substantial work which not unnaturally requires a pianist of heroic stature as well as a first-rate cellist. If Rubinstein’s idiom is more reminiscent of Mendelssohn than Russian folk-melody, he still contrives to sound a personal note with touches of Slavic ardour.

The Cello Sonata No 2 in G major Op 39 was composed in 1857, though Rubinstein revised it some years later. This is a larger, more ambitious conception than the D major sonata, with a true scherzo and slow movement as well as sonata-form first movement and finale.

The repertoire of nineteenth-century cello music is rich, but not so extensive that these two sonatas by Rubinstein should continue to be so neglected. They are both thoroughly enjoyable works, and the second sonata especially deserves a regular place in recital programmes.

Calum MacDonald © 2009

Né à Vikhvatnets (un village de la Bessarabie) dans une famille juive d’origine germano-polonaise, le compositeur, chef d’orchestre, professeur et administrateur Anton Rubinstein fut reconnu de son vivant comme l’un des grands pianistes virtuoses du XIXe siècle. Son père était un marchand prospère et toute la famille reçut le baptême chrétien lorsque Anton avait deux ans, avant d’emménager, trois ans plus tard, à Moscou. Pianiste prodige—comme son frère cadet Nikolaï—, Anton commença à se produire en public à l’âge de neuf ans. Sa réputation connut une ascension si fulgurante que Liszt (dont il sera par la suite l’élève de piano), Chopin, Kalkbrenner et Meyerbeer assistèrent à ses débuts parisiens en 1841. À partir de 1844, encouragé par Mendelssohn et Meyerbeer, il étudia la composition à Berlin sous la direction de Siegfried Dehn (ancien professeur de Glinka); en 1848, il rentra en Russie, où il devint chambriste virtuose de la grande-duchesse Helena Pavlovna, belle-sœur du tsar. Dans les années 1850, il sillonna toute l’Europe occidentale et fréquenta les Schumann, Brahms et le cercle lisztien. En 1858, il fut nommé chef d’orchestre des concerts impériaux, à Saint-Pétersbourg, avec une pension à vie. À ce titre, il fonda en 1862 le conservatoire de Saint-Pétersbourg, dont il assura la direction jusqu’en 1867. Puis, outre un harassant travail de composition, il reprit sa carrière internationale de virtuose itinérant: pianiste doué d’un répertoire et d’une endurance immenses, il fit notamment une tournée de neuf mois aux États-Unis (1872–3) avec le violoniste Wieniawski, durant laquelle il donna deux cent quinze récitals dans toutes les grandes villes du pays. À la fin des années 1880, de retour en Russie, il enseigna de nouveau au Conservatoire avant de s’installer à Dresde, en 1891. Mais, sa santé déclinant, il passa la dernière année de sa vie dans sa propriété située sur les rives de la Baltique, non loin de Saint-Pétersbourg; il y mourut en novembre 1894, à quelques jours de son soixante-cinquième anniversaire.

Formé à la composition dans la tradition germanique, Rubinstein demeura associé à l’aile «occidentalisante» de la musique russe du XIXe siècle. Immensément prolifique, il signa des opéras, des oratorios, des symphonies, des concertos mais aussi quantité d’œuvres de chambre et de pièces pour piano, plus de nombreuses mélodies. Il fut perçu de son vivant comme un compositeur majeur; pourtant, sa Mélodie en fa, une page relativement peu importante, resta longtemps sa seule œuvre à jouir d’une renommée posthume durable et, aujourd’hui encore, sa production (près de deux cents œuvres) est très partiellement connue. On le considère souvent comme un musicien trahi par sa facilité: la composition lui venait aisément et Brahms, qui aimait et respectait l’homme, comme l’interprète, regrettait qu’il ne se fût jamais assez échiné sur ses compositions. Mais des pièces comme le Concerto pour piano no 4, la Symphonie no 2 («Océan»), le recueil de vingt-quatre «portraits musicaux» pour piano intitulé Kamenniy-Ostrov et l’opéra Le démon—toutes œuvres qui se sont accrochées aux marges du répertoire—montrent un Rubinstein capable de fournir l’effort créatif requis, en compositeur des plus accomplis, à l’aise dans le salon comme dans la salle de concert et animé d’une profonde dévotion créative envers son pays natal, même s’il emprunta peu à la musique folklorique.

On peut assurément dire la même chose de ses deux impressionnantes sonates pour violoncelle et piano rédigées durant ses premiers voyages européens, dans les années 1850. Bien qu’écrites par un Rubinstein de vingt ans un peu passés, la Sonate pour violoncelle no 1 en ré majeur op. 18 (1852) est une œuvre assez substantielle qui requiert, on ne s’en étonnera pas, un pianiste d’envergure héroïque et en violoncelliste de première force. Malgré un idiome plus proche de Mendelssohn que des mélodies folkloriques russes, Rubinstein parvient à faire résonner une note personnelle, ponctuée d’ardeur slave.

Composée en 1857, puis révisée quelques années plus tard, la Sonate pour violoncelle no 2 en sol majeur op. 39 est plus vaste, plus ambitieuse que la Sonate en ré majeur avec un vrai scherzo, un mouvement lent, un premier mouvement de forme sonate et un finale.

Le répertoire de la musique violoncellistique du XIXe siècle est riche, mais pas au point de pouvoir continuer à tant négliger ces deux sonates de Rubinstein, profondément agréables—la seconde, surtout, mérite d’être régulièrement programmée dans les récitals.

Calum MacDonald © 2009
Français: Hypérion

Zu seinen Lebzeiten war Anton Rubinstein zwar am besten als einer der großen Klaviervirtuosen des 19. Jahrhunderts bekannt, aber auch als Komponist, Lehrer und Administrator. Er wurde im bessarabischen Dorf Wychwatinez als Sohn einer jüdischen Familie von deutsch-polnischer Herkunft geboren. Sein Vater war ein erfolgreicher Kaufmann, und die Familie wurde christlich getauft, als Anton zwei Jahre alt war. Drei Jahre später zogen sie nach Moskau. Als Pianist war er—wie auch sein jüngerer Bruder Nikolai—ein Wunderkind und begann im Alter von neun Jahren öffentlich aufzutreten. Sein Ruhm verbreitete sich so schnell, dass Liszt, Chopin, Kalkbrenner und Meyerbeer zu seinem Debüt in Paris kamen, und später wurde er Liszts Klavierschüler. Ermutigt von Mendelssohn und Meyerbeer, studierte er ab 1844 in Berlin bei Siegfried Dehn (der auch Glinka unterrichtet hatte) Komposition und kehrte 1848 als Kammervirtuose der Großfürstin Elena Pawlowna, Schwägerin des Zaren, nach Russland zurück. In den 1850er Jahren reiste Rubinstein weithin in Westeuropa und war den Schumanns und Brahms sowie im Liszt-Zirkel gut bekannt. 1858 wurde er mit einer lebenslangen Pension zum Kaiserlichen Konzertdirektor in St. Petersburg ernannt. Als solcher gründete er 1862 das Konservatorium in Sankt Petersburg und war bis 1867 sein erster Direktor. Danach kehrte er neben seinem strapaziösen Kompositionspogramm zu seiner Karriere als reisender internationaler Virtuose zurück. Als Pianist hatte Rubinstein ein enormes Repertoire und immenses Durchhaltevermögen—zum Beispiel gab er 1872–73 in einer neunmonatigen Konzerttournee in den USA mit dem Geiger Wieniawski 215 Recitals in allen größeren amerikanischen Städten. Ende der 1880er Jahre kehrte er nach Russland zurück und unterrichtete wiederum am Konservatorium, zog aber 1891 nach Dresden. Sein Gesundheitszustand verschlechterte sich jedoch, und er verbrachte seine letzten Lebensjahre auf seinem Landgut an der Ostseeküste in der Nähe von Sankt Petersburg, wo er im November 1894 ein paar Tage vor seinem 65. Geburtstag starb.

Rubinsteins kompositorische Ausbildung stand in der der deutschen Tradition, und er war auch immer mit dem eher „westlich“ orientierten Flügel der russischen Musik des 19. Jahrhunderts assoziiert. Außerdem war er enorm fruchtbar, schrieb Opern, Oratorien, Symphonien, Konzerte, sowie eine große Zahl von Kammermusikwerken und viele Lieder. Obwohl er zu Lebzeiten als bedeutender Komponist angesehen wurde, blieb viele Jahre lang die verhältnismäßig unbedeutende Melodie in F sein einziges postum berühmtes Werk, und nur ein Bruchteil seines Œuvres von nahezu 200 Werken ist heute bekannt. Er wird oft als ein Musiker betrachtet, der Opfer seiner eigenen Fertigkeit war: Komposition fiel ihm leicht, und Brahms, der Rubinstein als Mensch und Interpret mochte und schätzte, schalt, dass er sich mit seinen Werken nie genug Mühe gab. Trotzdem zeigen Werke wie das Vierte Klavierkonzert, die Zweite Symphonie („Ozean“), die Sammlung Kamenniy-Ostrov von 24 „musikalischen Porträts“ für Klavier und die Oper Der Dämon, dass Rubinstein genügend kreative Anstrengungen machen konnte, und diese Werke haben sich am Rande des Repertoires gehalten. Sie bezeugen einen versierten Komponisten, der im Salon genauso zu Hause war wie im Konzertsaal, und dessen kreative Zuneigung zu seinem Heimatland tief war, auch wenn seine Schöpfungen der russischen Volksmusik nur wenig verdanken.

Das lässt sich auch über seine beiden eindrucksvollen Sonaten für Cello und Klavier sagen. Beide gehören seiner ersten Periode von Wanderjahren in Europa in den 1850er Jahren an. Rubinstein war erst Anfang seiner 20er Jahre als er 1852 die Cellosonate Nr. 1 in D-Dur, op. 18 komponierte, aber sie ist ein relativ substantielles Werk, das natürlich einen Pianisten von heroischen Proportionen sowie einen erstklassigen Cellisten erfordert. Obwohl Rubinsteins Idiom eher an Mendelssohn als eine russische Volksmelodie erinnert, erreicht er dennoch einen persönlichen Ton mit Anklängen an slawische Glut.

Die Cellosonate Nr. 2 in G-Dur, op. 39 wurde 1857 komponiert, obwohl Rubinstein sie einige Jahre später revidierte. Mit einem echten Scherzo und langsamen Satz sowie dem ersten Satz und Finale in Sonatenform ist sie größer und ehrgeiziger konzipiert als die D-Dur-Sonate.

Das Repertoire von Cellomusik des 19. Jahrhunderts ist zwar reich, aber nicht so extensiv, dass diese beiden Sonaten von Rubinstein es verdienten, so vernachlässigt zu werden. Sie sind beide ganz und gar gefällige Werke, und besonders die zweite Sonate verdient einen festen Platz in Recitals.

Calum MacDonald © 2009
Deutsch: Renate Wendel

Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...
Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.