Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

Delectatio angeli

Music of love, longing & lament
Catherine Bott (soprano), Pavlo Beznosiuk (fiddle), Mark Levy (fiddle)
Recording details: April 2001
Angel Studios, Islington, London, United Kingdom
Produced by Catherine Bott & Stephen Henderson
Engineered by Steve Price & Mat Bartram
Release date: January 2006
Total duration: 61 minutes 48 seconds

Cover artwork: The Meeting on the Turret Stairs by Frederick William Burton (1816-1900)
The National Gallery of Ireland
 
1
Ar ne kuth ich sorghe non 'The Prisoner's Song'  [3'33]  Anonymous - traditional
2
3
O rosa bella  [3'38]  John Bedyngham (dc1459/60)
4
Can vei la lauzeta mover  [7'15]  Bernart de Ventadorn (1125-1195)
5
Par maintes foys  [2'49]  Jehan Vaillant (fl1360-1390)
6
Trop est mes maris jalos  [3'28]  Etienne de Meaux (fl1250-1250)
7
Giunta vaga biltà  [2'35]  Francesco Landini (c1325-1397)
8
Per quella strada  [3'19]  Johannes Ciconia (c1335-1411)
9
Una panthera  [3'44]  Johannes Ciconia (c1335-1411)
10
L'alta belleza tua  [1'38]  Guillaume Dufay (1397-1474)
11
Helas mon dueil  [3'14]  Guillaume Dufay (1397-1474)
12
Vergene bella  [4'10]  Guillaume Dufay (1397-1474)
13
Le greygnour bien  [4'36]  Matteo da Perugia (d?1418)
14
Four Planctus  [15'54]  Anonymous - traditional

An extract from Kate Bott’s introduction to this recording:

“This project began over lunch at Pavlo Beznosiuk’s house, when he, Mark Levy and I were spending a day playing through our favourite repertoire, with a view to making a CD celebrating the compelling sound of one voice and two fiddles. The fiddle was a five-stringed bowed instrument which was the most important musical instrument in the middle ages, because in the hands of a master fiddler it could so closely follow and imitate the human voice. We’d begun exploring this combination of gut strings (theirs and mine) almost by chance a few years ago—and the experience proved so liberating that we kept going.

“There are various ways of creating a programme for a recording. You can record someone’s complete output within a genre—but no one wrote their songs and dances exclusively for soprano and fiddles. You can devise a programme around a theme—well, the overwhelming topic for solo songs is, of course, unrequited love, but that would mean leaving out so many interesting lyrics. Or you can just make a delicious and varied selection of great music from among your own personal favourites and go into a recording studio.

“A studio? When it is a truth universally acknowledged that early music is always recorded in a lovely country church? How could we deprive ourselves of all those stirring times when your best performance ever fades into a Gothic silence accompanied only by the distant roar of a ride-on lawnmower, or a reassuring helicopter accompanying the passage of Someone Very Important to the nearest country house hotel? Without a backward glance, as it turned out.

“Mark and Pavlo are players of international standing on the Baroque viol and violin—I never fail to be moved by the passion and spontaneity of their performances on medieval fiddles, and I’m bowled over by their commitment to getting the most out of these more primitive instruments. It was one of those magical recordings that was a delight to make from start to finish.

“Whether you’re discovering this wondrous music for the first time or are revisiting much-loved repertoire, I hope you enjoy these pieces as much as we do.”

Reviews

'The vivid ambience of the recordings, the quality of the chosen compositions, the incisive, animated, full-toned precision of the fiddle playing and performances by Bott make for 62 minutes of pure pleasure … these performances must rank amongst Bott's best (and that's saying something)' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Delectable is just about the right word for this sequence of pieces sung by Catherine Bott, with and without the fiddles of Pavlo Beznosiuk and Mark Levy. … the simplicity and spontaneity of the pared-down and often improvisatory approach enormously enhances the emotional impact of the music, and brings the listener extraordinarily close to the characters whose deepest feelings are being voiced' (The Daily Telegraph)

'The outstanding CD of the month' (Early Music Review)

'This is some of the most elegant singing I have heard and certainly some of the best fiddle playing now available … it is an excellent single-disc anthology of medieval song' (American Record Guide)

'In every respect this CD is an utter delight. The music is charming, the performances infectious, the recording is simply outstanding and the booklet complete with full texts and translations into modern English, is a real pleasure to read … this disc is a source of unreserved pleasure' (International Record Review)

'A sublime survey of music and textual conceits from a remote yet immediately communicative past … soprano and string players wear their classical training lightly, catching the folk flavour of this beguiling repertoire' (Classic FM Magazine)

'We had to wait five years for its release. Believe me, it was worth the wait. Hear this haunting music' (Fanfare, USA)

'Charmingly and effectively done, it is well worth hearing' (Scotland on Sunday)

Other recommended albums

Bantock: Hebridean & Celtic Symphonies
CDA66450
Purcell: Ayres for the theatre
CDH55010
‘In the meane time felowes, pype upp your fiddles, I saie take them
And let your freyndes here such mirth as ye can make them.’
From Gammer Gurton’s Needle, an English comedy from the time of Edward VI.

That quote sums up the spirit of this CD. The project began over lunch at Pavlo Beznosiuk’s house, when he, Mark Levy and I were spending a day playing through our favourite repertoire, with a view to making a CD celebrating the compelling sound of one voice and two fiddles. The fiddle has five strings and was the most important musical instrument in the Middle Ages, because in the hands of a master fiddler it could so closely follow and imitate the human voice.

We’d begun exploring this combination of gut strings (theirs and mine) almost by chance a few years ago—and the experience proved so liberating that we kept going. The other splendid historical precedent for it is the frequent appearance in medieval sources of fiddle players in pairs, like the brothers Charles and Jean Orbus who played for the fifteenth-century theorist and composer Tinctoris: ‘At Bruges, I heard Charles take the treble and Jean the tenor in many songs, playing the fiddle so expertly and with such charm that the fiddle has never pleased me so well.’

There are various ways of creating a programme for a recording. You can record someone’s complete output within a genre—but no one wrote their songs and dances exclusively for soprano and fiddles. You can devise a programme around a theme—well, the overwhelming topic for solo songs is, of course, unrequited love, but that would mean leaving out so many interesting lyrics and I’m easily as fascinated by words as by music. Or you can just make a delicious and varied selection of great music from among your own personal favourites and go into a recording studio.

A studio? When it is a truth universally acknowledged that early music must always be recorded in a lovely country church? How could we deprive ourselves of all those stirring times when your best ever performance fades into a Gothic silence accompanied only by the distant roar of a ride-on lawnmower, or a reassuring helicopter accompanying the passage of Someone Very Important to the nearest country house hotel? Without a backward glance, as it turned out.

Angel Studios in Islington, north London, had the ideal room. It had one of the finest and most musical engineers around, Steve Price, who was actually excited by the challenge. And in a studio we could clothe our—completely straight—performances of medieval and Renaissance repertoire with the sound of a lovely country church if we wanted, or perhaps a courtly chamber or a village green.

A prison cell is where this recording begins: with an anonymous thirteenth-century English song, Ar ne kuth ich sorghe non, also known as The Prisoner’s Song. The handwriting and various linguistic features of the text fit with the first half of the thirteenth century and the south of England, most probably London or Essex. The story, though, is timeless—the singer has been wrongfully convicted and prays for release.

Next, an English Dance from around the same time—in acoustic terms we went out of doors to record this one, and Pavlo and Mark gradually doubled themselves on separate tracks until there were eight of them altogether.

O rosa bella is English too, by a composer who hid his light under a bushel of alternative names: tantalizingly little is known about the life and career of John Bedyngham / Bodigham / Bellingun / Benigun / Boddenham. O rosa bella is a heartfelt lament from a young man who thinks he’s dying of love for an unattainable girl.

Ah, courtly love—a particularly male emotion this. You worship a pale and beautiful lady of noble birth, but cannot ever hope to make her yours. She is out of your reach and usually married. And round this symbol of unattainability grew a whole genre of music and poetry in the Middle Ages. The troubadours and trouvères of France were the chief exponents of this art form, and very heart-rending it is too, this exquisite marriage of beautiful melody and hopelessness. Far be it from me to point out that putting a woman on a pedestal, declaring her virtue to be beyond price and languishing after her gives said woman absolutely no opportunity, should she fancy it, of actually stepping off her pedestal without incurring your total revulsion. See how quickly Bernart de Ventadorn despairs of the whole sex in his Can vei la lauzeta mover. But it is a beautiful and tragic song, atmospherically coloured here by Mark’s improvised accompaniment.

And when does a young man’s fancy lightly turn to thoughts of courtly love? Why, in spring, when you ‘cast a clout’ and venture out to enjoy nature, red in tooth and claw. Or beak and claw, in the case of Jehan Vaillant’s Par maintes foys—count the number of birds vying for supremacy of the skies.

Let’s not forget the ordinary kind of love, which often resulted in marriage, after which familiarity bred contempt. The French expressed this staple ingredient of the human condition best, in their ‘songs of the ill-wed’, and Trop est mes maris jalos is a splendid, earthy example of sisters doing it for themselves.

Next, we move to Italy, cradle of the Renaissance, and to a song that began my passion for really early music when I heard James Bowman sing it on one of his early recordings with David Munrow. The mix of transparency and subtlety in Landini’s Giunta vaga biltá draws you in right from the start. This too is a courtly love lyric, but more positive, more confident—true Italianate appreciation of a beautiful woman. The only sadness behind it lies in the knowledge that Francesco Landini was himself blind.

The Italian way of life attracted people from northern Europe even in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries—the Flemish composer Johannes Ciconia spent his working life in Rome and Padua, where he composed the next two songs especially to tickle the vanity of his patrons. Per quella strada, for the Carrara family of Padua, and Una panthera, in honour of the city of Lucca, depict heraldic devices with breathtaking coloratura virtuosity. I’ve been singing both of them for years with Pavlo and Mark, but they waited until we were in the studio to tell me that they’d always fancied doing the three-part Una panthera without vocals. We had the technology, so Mark added the middle part on a separate track, creating a once-in-a-lifetime performance. In concert, they have to include me.

With the masterpieces of Guillaume Dufay, our only difficulty lay in choosing just a few favourites. In the end, we went for the sophisticated syncopations of one of his Italian lyrics, L’alta belleza tua, and the sensuous pathos of Helas mon dueil. And we couldn’t leave out his setting of Petrarch’s poem Vergene bella. This is a plea to the Virgin for help in a man’s struggle with his life; it would have been blasphemous to say so in Dufay’s lifetime, but the lyric is almost like a troubadour’s plea to his beloved and distant lady. The difference is that the singer trusts completely in the Virgin: ‘You have never turned away—hear my prayer.’

The next song is simply one of the cleverest pieces of contemporary music ever to have come out of France—sometime before the year 1418. Le greygnour bien is a benchmark of the Ars subtilior—that ‘more subtle art’ which deploys conflicting time signatures and complex rhythms to display its conceits. This exquisitely mannered repertoire has fascinated audiences since it was written, and easily bears comparision with the most ‘difficult’ of modern music.

Finally, to Spain: we’ve given many performances of the Four Planctus, or Laments, from Las Huelgas, a Cistercian convent near Burgos. And each one is a premiere—after the first, unaccompanied lament for King Sancho, I sing the remaining three over Pavlo and Mark’s improvised playing. In the studio, I recorded the first piece alone, and then we performed the rest of the work twice through. As often happens, the first performance was so powerful that it was the obvious choice.

Mark and Pavlo are players of international standing on the Baroque viol and violin—I never fail to be moved by the passion and spontaneity of their performances on medieval fiddles, and I’m bowled over by their commitment to getting the most out of these less sophisticated instruments. And Stephen Henderson’s experience with the repertoire and familiarity with studio techniques made him an invaluable co-producer. It was one of those magical recordings that was a delight to make from start to finish, thanks also to Steve and Mat in the control room. Whether you’re discovering this wondrous music for the first time or are revisiting much-loved repertoire, I hope you enjoy these pieces as much as we do.

Catherine Bott © 2006

«Sur ce, compagnons, mettez-vous à jouer de vos violons, je dis prenez-les
Et que vos amis aient autant de joie que vous pouvez leur en donner.»
Extrait de Gammer Gurton’s Needle, comédie anglaise du temps d’Édouard VI.

Cette citation résume l’esprit de ce CD, dont le projet naquit lors d’un déjeuner chez Pavlo Beznosiuk: cette fois-là, lui, Mark Levy et moi passâmes la journée à jouer notre répertoire favori en vue de faire un disque qui célébrerait le son envoûtant d’une voix mêlée à deux violons. Doté d’un archet et de cinq cordes, le violon était, au Moyen Âge, l’instrument de musique le plus important car, entre les mains d’un maître, il pouvait suivre et imiter très fidèlement la voix humaine.

Cette combinaison de cordes en boyau (les leurs et les miennes), nous avions déjà commencé de l’explorer quelques années auparavant, presque par hasard—une expérience si libératrice que nous l’avons poursuivie. Autre merveilleux précédent historique, les sources médiévales font souvent état de duos de violonistes, tels les frères Charles et Jean Orbus, qui jouèrent pour le théoricien et compositeur du XVe siècle, Tinctoris: «À Bruges, j’ai entendu Charles tenir le soprano et Jean le ténor dans de nombreux chants, jouant du violon de manière si experte et avec un charme tel que jamais cet instrument ne m’a plu autant.»

Il existe bien des façons d’agencer un programme. Vous pouvez enregistrer toute la production d’un compositeur dans un genre donné—mais personne n’a écrit de chants et de danses juste pour soprano et violons. Vous pouvez l’organiser autour d’un thème—les chants solo parlent bien sûr, et surtout, d’amour non partagé, mais on laisse alors de côté maintes chansons intéressantes, or les mots me fascinent volontiers autant que la musique. Enfin, vous pouvez tout simplement proposer de la grande musique, délicieuse et variée, choisie parmi vos propres pièces favorites, et entrer en studio d’enregistrement.

En studio? Quand chacun sait que la musique ancienne est toujours enregistrée dans une charmante église de campagne? Comment avons-nous pu nous priver de ces instants passionnants, où la meilleure interprétation ne manque jamais de s’évanouir dans un silence gothique avec, au loin, le grondement d’une mototondeuse ou d’un hélicoptère rassurant, venu escorter quelqu’un-de-très-important à l’hôtel de campagne voisin? Nous n’avons pas hésité, en fin de compte.

Les Angel Studios d’Islington, au nord de Londres, avaient la salle idéale, ainsi que l’un des meilleurs ingénieurs, l’un des plus musiciens aussi, Steve Price, que notre défi enthousiasma. Et puis, en studio, nos interprétations du répertoire médiéval et renaissant étaient totalement pures et nous pouvions les habiller du son d’une charmante église de campagne, d’une chambre d’amour courtois ou d’une place de village.

Cet enregistrement commence dans une cellule de prison avec un chant anglais anonyme du XIIIe siècle, Ar ne kuth ich sorghe non, également appelé The Prisoner’s Song. La calligraphie et diverses caractéristiques linguistiques du texte concordent avec la première moitié du XIIIe siècle et le sud de l’Angleterre, très probablement Londres ou l’Essex. L’histoire, elle, est intemporelle: le héros a été condamné à tort et supplie qu’on le relâche.

Puis vient une English Dance, à peu près contemporaine—pour des raisons acoustiques, nous l’avons enregistrée dehors, et Pavlo et Mark se sont progressivement doublés sur des pistes séparées jusqu’à en avoir huit.

Le compositeur de O rosa bella, autre pièce anglaise, s’est caché sous un boisseau de pseudonymes: nous avons une frustrante méconnaissance de la vie et de la carrière de John Bedyngham / Bodigham / Bellingun / Benigun / Boddenham. O rosa bella est la lamentation sincère d’un jeune homme convaincu de se mourir d’amour pour une jeune fille inaccessible.

Ah, l’amour courtois: une émotion toute masculine que celle-là. Vous adorez une pâle et belle jeune fille de noble extraction, mais jamais vous ne pourrez la faire vôtre: elle est hors d’atteinte, généralement mariée. Au Moyen Âge, ce symbole de l’inaccessibilité a suscité tout un genre musicalo-poétique, dont les troubadours et les trouvères de France furent les grands apôtres—très touchant, aussi, que cet exquis mariage d’une belle mélodie et de la désespérance. Loin de moi l’idée de souligner que mettre une femme sur un piédestal, décréter sa vertu sans prix et languir après elle ne donne absolument aucune occasion à ladite femme de descendre, s’il lui en prend l’envie, de son piédestal sans encourir votre totale révulsion. Voyez comme Bernart de Ventadorn désespère rapidement du sexe tout entier dans son Can vei la lauzeta mover. Mais c’est une belle et tragique chanson, que l’accompagnement improvisé de Mark teinte ici d’un climat particulier.

Et quand un jeune homme se prend-il à songer à l’amour courtois? Mais enfin, au printemps, quand on «change de peau» et qu’on part goûter la nature, toutes dents et toutes griffes dehors. Ou, plutôt, tous becs et toutes serres dehors, dans le cas de Par maintes foys de Jehan Vaillant—voyez le nombre d’oiseaux qui se disputent la suprématie des cieux.

N’oublions pas pour autant l’amour ordinaire, qui se traduisait souvent par un mariage, dans le sillage duquel la familiarité engendrait le mépris. Ce furent les Français qui exprimèrent le mieux cet élément fondamental de la condition humaine dans leurs «chansons de malmariées», dont Trop est mes maris jalos, qui met en scène des sœurs, est une splendide et truculent exemple.

Partons maintenant pour l’Italie, berceau de la Renaissance, avec une chanson qui fut à l’origine de ma passion pour la musique vraiment ancienne—je l’ai découverte chantée par James Bowman, sur l’un de ses premiers enregistrements, aux côtés de David Munrow. D’emblée, Guinta vaga biltá de Landini vous séduit par son mélange de transparence et de subtilité. C’est aussi une chanson d’amour courtois, mais plus positive, plus confiante—un véritable jaugeage italianisant d’une belle femme. La seule tristesse vient de ce que nous savons que Francesco Landini était aveugle.

Le mode de vie italien attirait les gens d’Europe du Nord, même aux XIVe et XVe siècles, et le compositeur flamand Johannes Ciconia travailla toute sa vie à Rome et à Padoue, où il écrivit les deux chansons suivantes pour chatouiller l’amour-propre de ses mécènes. Per quella strada, destinée à la famille Carrara de Padoue, et Una panthera, en l’honneur de la cité de Lucques, dépeignent des emblèmes héraldiques avec une époustouflante virtuosité de colorature. Pendant des années, je les ai chantées avec Pavlo et Mark, mais ils ont attendu que nous soyons en studio pour me dire qu’ils avaient toujours voulu faire l’Una panthera à trois parties, sans chant. Comme nous avions la technologie nécessaire, Mark a ajouté la partie médiane sur une piste séparée, créant une interprétation unique. Mais en concert, ils doivent m’inclure.

Avec les chefs-d’œuvre de Guillaume Dufay, notre seul souci fut de restreindre le nombre de nos pièces préférées. Finalement, nous choisîmes les syncopes sophistiquées d’une de ses chansons italiennes, L’alta belleza tua, et le pathos sensuel d’Helas mon dueil. En outre, nous n’avons pu résister à sa mise en musique du poème de Pétrarque, Vergene bella, où un homme en proie aux difficultés de la vie supplie la Vierge de l’aider. Le dire au temps de Dufay aurait été blasphématoire, mais cette chansons ressemble presque à la supplique d’un troubadour à sa dame, lointaine et bien-aimée, à cette différence près qu’ici, le héros a une confiance absolue en la Vierge: «Tu ne t’es jamais détournée, entends ma prière.»

La chanson suivante est tout simplement l’une des plus intelligentes œuvres musicales jamais produites par la France d’alors—nous sommes un peu avant 1418. Le greygnour bien est une référence de l’Ars subtilior, cet «art très subtil» qui déploie des signes de la mesure conflictuels et des rythmes complexes pour mettre en valeur ses traits d’esprit. Ce répertoire exquisément maniéré, qui a d’emblée fasciné les auditoires, soutient sans peine la comparaison avec la plus «difficile» des musiques modernes.

Pour terminer, l’Espagne: nous avons souvent joué les quatre Planctus, ou Lamentations, de Las Huelgas, un couvent cistercien près de Burgos. Et tous sont des premières—la première lamentation, pour le roi Sancho, est sans accompagnement; quant aux trois autres, je les chante sur un jeu improvisé de Mark et de Pavlo. En studio, j’ai enregistré la première pièce seule, puis nous avons interprété le reste de l’œuvre deux fois. Comme souvent, la première version était si puissante qu’elle s’est imposée d’elle-même.

Mark et Pavlo sont des violistes et des violonistes baroques d’envergure internationale—je suis constamment émue par la passion et la spontanéité de leurs interprétations sur violons médiévaux et leur dévouement à tirer le meilleur de ces instruments primitifs me sidère. Son expérience de ce répertoire et sa science des techniques de studio firent de Stephen Henderson un inestimable coproducteur. Ce fut l’un de ces enregistrements magiques qui sont une joie à réaliser, du début à la fin, grâce aussi à Steve et à Mat, en régie. Que vous découvriez cette merveilleuse musique ou que vous retrouviez un répertoire adoré, j’espère que ces pièces vous apporteront autant de plaisir qu’à nous.

Catherine Bott © 2006
Français: Hypérion

„Doch nun, Kameraden, lasst vernehmen eure Fiedeln, ich sage nehmt sie zur Hand
und lasst eure Freunde hören soviel Frohsinn, wie ihr ihnen entlocken könnt.“
Aus Gammer Gurton’s Needle, einer englischen Komödie aus der Zeit Eduards VI.

Dieses Zitat erfasst den Geist der vorliegenden CD. Das Projekt nahm beim Mittagessen in Pavlo Beznosiuks Haus Gestalt an, als er, Mark Levy und ich den Tag damit verbrachten, unser Lieblingsrepertoire durchzuspielen, und zwar im Hinblick auf die Planung einer CD, die dem bezwingenden Klang einer Gesangsstimme und zweier Fiedeln gewidmet sein sollte. Die Fiedel war ein fünfsaitiges Streichinstrument, das als wichtigstes Instrument des Mittelalters gelten kann, weil es in den Händen eines Meisters so präzise der menschlichen Stimme folgen und sie imitieren konnte.

Wir hatten einige Jahre zuvor fast zufällig damit begonnen, diese Kombination von (ihren) Darmsaiten und (meinen) Gedärmen zu erkunden—und die Erfahrung erwies sich als derart befreiend, dass wir damit fortfuhren. Der andere wunderbare Präzedenzfall ist die häufige Erwähnung des paarweisen Auftretens von Fiedlern in mittelalterlichen Quellen, so z.B. die Brüder Charles und Jean Orbus, die im fünfzehnten Jahrhundert für den Theoretiker und Komponisten Tinctoris spielten: „In Brügge hörte ich, wie in vielen Liedern Charles die Diskantstimme und Jean den Tenor übernahm; sie spielten die Fiedel derart gekonnt und bezaubernd, dass mir das Instrument soviel Gefallen bereitete wie nie zuvor.“

Es gibt verschiedene Methoden, das Programm einer Einspielung zu erstellen. Man kann jemandes gesamtes Schaffen in einem bestimmten Genre aufnehmen—aber niemand hat je alle seine Lieder und Tänze ausschließlich für Sopran und Fiedel gesetzt. Man kann das Programm um ein bestimmtes Thema herum gestalten—die übergroße Mehrheit aller Sololieder handelt natürlich von unerwiderter Liebe, aber das würde bedeuten, viele interessante Texte auszuklammern, und mich faszinieren die Texte mindestens so sehr wie die Musik. Oder man kann einfach aus der Vielzahl persönlicher Lieblingsstücke eine köstliche und abwechslungsreiche Auswahl großartiger Musik treffen und damit ins Aufnahmestudio gehen.

Ins Aufnahmestudio? Wo doch allgemein bekannt ist, das alte Musik immer in einer wunderschönen alten Dorfkirche eingespielt wird? Wie konnten wir nur auf all jene mitreißenden Momente verzichten, wenn die beste Darbietung des Tages in der Stille eines gotischen Baus verklingt, nur begleitet vom fernen Dröhnen eines Rasenmähers oder dem beruhigenden Knattern des Hubschraubers, der irgendwelche Prominenz ins nächstgelegene Schlosshotel befördert? Ohne es auch nur im geringsten zu bedauern, wie sich herausstellte.

Angel Studios im Nordlondoner Stadtteil Islington verfügten über den idealen Raum, und über einen der besten und musikalischsten Tonmeister, Steve Price, der sich wahrhaftig auch noch über die Herausforderung freute. Und in einem Studio konnten wir unsere—ganz und gar unverfälschten—Darbietungen von mittelalterlichem und Renaissance-Repertoire nach Bedarf in das Ambiente einer wunderschönen Dorfkirche, eines Gemachs bei Hofe oder gar eines Dorfangers versetzen.

Der Ort, an dem unsere Aufnahme beginnt, ist eine Gefängniszelle: Sie setzt ein mit dem englischen Lied eines anonymen Verfassers aus dem dreizehnten Jahrhundert, Ar ne kuth ich sorghe non, auch bekannt als The Prisoner’s Song (Des Gefangenen Lied). Die Handschrift und verschiedene linguistische Merkmale lassen auf die erste Hälfte des dreizehnten Jahrhunderts und den Süden Englands schließen; höchstwahrscheinlich stammt es aus London oder der Grafschaft Essex. Die Fabel ist hingegen zeitlos—der Sänger ist zu Unrecht verurteilt worden und betet um seine Freilassung.

Es folgt ein englischer Tanz (English Dance) aus der gleichen Zeit—aus Gründen der Akustik begaben wir uns ins Freie, um ihn aufzunehmmen; Pavlo und Mark spielten nach und nach eine Spur nach der anderen ein, bis sie schließlich zu acht waren.

O rosa bella ist ebenfalls englisch, von einem Komponisten, der sein Licht unter den Scheffel verschiedenster Namen stellte: Man weiß verzweiflungsvoll wenig über Leben und Laufbahn des John Bedyngham / Bodigham / Bellingun / Benigun / Boddenham. O rosa bella ist die tief empfundene Klage eines jungen Mannes, der aus Liebe zu einem unerreichbaren Mädchen meint, sterben zu müssen.

Ach, die Minne—eine spezifisch männliche Gefühlsäußerung. Man betet eine blasse und schöne Dame edler Herkunft an, ohne je hoffen zu können, sie zu erobern. Sie ist unerreichbar und gewöhnlich verheiratet. Und um dieses Symbol der Unerreichbarkeit wuchs im Mittelalter ein ganzes Genre von Musik und Dichtung heran. Die französischen Troubadours und Trouvères waren die Hauptvertreter dieser Kunstform, und sie ist ja auch besonders herzzerreißend, diese exquisite Verbindung von wunderbarer Melodie und Hoffnungslosigkeit. Nichts läge mir ferner, als festzustellen, dass diese Praxis der Vergötterung einer Frau, bei der ihre Tugend als unangreifbar dargestellt wird, während man zugleich nach ihr schmachtet, besagter Frau keinerlei Gelegenheit gibt (sollte sie so geneigt sein), von ihrem Göttersockel herabzusteigen, ohne den Abscheu des Mannes zu erregen. Man beachte, wie rasch Bernart de Ventadorn in seinem Can vei la lauzeta mover an dem ganzen Geschlecht verzweifelt. Aber es ist ein schönes und tragisches Lied, hier von Marks improvisierter Begleitung stimmungsvoll gefärbt.

Und wann wendet sich des jungen Mannes Phantasie besonders gern der Minne zu? Natürlich im Frühling, wenn er „den Mantel abwirft“ und sich in die ungezähmte Natur hinauswagt. Unbezähmbar in Bezug auf Schnabel und Kralle im Falle von Jehan Vaillants Par maintes foys—man beachte die Vielzahl von Vögeln, die um die Vorherrschaft am Himmel streiten.

Vergessen wir auch nicht die übliche Form der Liebe, die oft in Heirat endete, woraufhin allzu enge Vertrautheit zu Verachtung zu führen pflegte. Die Franzosen brachten dieses Grundelement des mensclichen Zusammenlebens in ihren „Liedern schlechter Ehe“ am besten zum Ausdruck, und Trop est mes maris jalos ist ein großartig derbes Beispiel dafür, wie die „Schwestern“ sich selbt helfen.

Nun kommen wir nach Italien, der Wiege der Renaissance, und zu einem Lied, das meine Begeisterung für ernsthaft alte Musik aufwallen ließ, als ich es von James Bowman gesungen hörte, und zwar auf einer seiner frühen Einspielungen mit David Munrow. Die Mischung von Klarheit und Feinsinnigkeit in Landinis Giunta vaga biltá fasziniert von Anfang an. Auch dies ist ein Text der Minne, doch ist er positiver, selbstbewusster—wahrhaft italienische Bewunderung einer schönen Frau. Das einzig Traurige daran ist das Wissen darum, dass Francesco Landini selbst blind war.

Die italienische Lebensweise zog schon im vierzehnten und fünfzehnten Jahrhundert Menschen aus Nordeuropa an—der flämische Komponist Johannes Ciconia verbrachte sein Arbeitsleben in Rom und Padua, wo er die nächsten beiden Lieder speziell zu dem Zweck komponierte, seinen Gönnern zu schmeicheln. Per quella strada für die Familie Carrara aus Padua und Una panthera zu Ehren der Stadt Lucca stellen mit atemberaubend virtuoser Koloratur verschiedene Wappenembleme dar. Ich singe beide Lieder seit Jahren zusammen mit Pavlo und Mark, aber sie warteten, bis wir im Studio waren, um mir mitzuteieln, dass sie schon immer Lust hätten, das dreistimmige Una panthera einmal ohne Gesang zu spielen. Wir verfügten über die nötige Technik, also konnte Mark die Mittelstimme als separate Spur einspielen und so eine einzigartige Darbietung schaffen. Im Konzert können sie jedoch noch nicht auf mich verzichten.

Bei den Meisterwerken von Guillaume Dufay war unser einziges Problem, uns auf einige wenige Lieblingsstücke zu beschränken. Schließlich entschieden wir uns für die anspruchsvollen Synkopen seines italienischen Lieds L’alta belleza tua und für das sinnliche Pathos von Helas mon dueil. Und auf seine Vertonung von Petrarcas Gedicht Vergene bella konnten wir einfach nicht verzichten. Dabei handelt es sich um einen Appell an die Jungfrau Maria, einem Mann bei der Bewältigung seines Lebens zu helfen; zu Lebzeiten Dufays hätte es als lästerlich gegolten, so etwas zu sagen, aber der Text ähnelt sehr dem Appell eines Troubadours an seine geliebte und ferne Dame. Der Unterschied ist nur, dass der Sänger der Jungfrau vollkommen vertraut: „Du wandtest dich nie ab, erhöre mein Gebet.“

Das nächste Lied ist schlicht eines der geistreichsten zeitgenössischen Musikstücke, das je in Frankreich entstand—und zwar um das Jahr 1418. Le greygnour bien ist ein Höhepunkt der Ars subtilior—jener „subtileren Kunst“, die gegensätzliche Taktvorzeichen und komlexe Rhythmen nutzt, um ihre Kultiviertheit hervorzukehren. Dieses exquisit manierierte Repertoire hat seit seiner Entstehung das Publikum fasziniert und hält jeden Vergleich mit der „schwierigsten“ modernen Musik aus.

Und abschließend gelangen wir nach Spanien: Wir haben zahlreiche Darbietungen der Vier Planctus hinter uns, jener Klagelieder aus Las Huelgas, einem Zisterzienserkloster in der Nähe von Burgos. Und jede dieser Darbietungen ist eine Premiere—nach der ersten unbegleiteten Klage für König Sancho singe ich die anderen drei zu Pavlos und Marks improvisiertem Spiel. Im Studio nahm ich das erste Stück allein auf, und dann spielten wir das Weitere zweimal durch. Wie so oft war die erste Darbietung so überzeugend, dass wir sie eindeutig bevorzugten.

Mark und Pavlo sind Interpreten von internationalem Rang auf der Barockgambe bzw. -geige, doch bin ich jedesmal zutiefst beeindruckt von der Leidenschaft und Spontaneität ihres Spiels auf mittelalterlichen Fiedeln und verblüfft über das Engagement, mit dem sie diesen primitiveren Instrumenten das Beste zu entlocken versuchen. Und Stephen Hendersons Erfahrung im Umgang mit diesem Repertoire und seine Vertrautheit mit Studiotechnik machten ihn zum unersetzlichen Koproduzenten. Dies war eine jener magischen Einspielungen, die von Anfang bis Ende eine Freude war, auch dank Steve und Mat am Mischpult. Ob Sie nun diese zauberhafte Musik neu für sich entdecken oder ein vielgeliebtes Repertoire zum wiederholten Mal hören, hoffe ich doch, dass Sie diese Stücke so sehr genießen wie wir.

Catherine Bott © 2006
Deutsch: Anne Steeb/Bernd Müller

Acknowledgments Thanks once again to Simon Perry and Hyperion Records for seeing the point immediately; to Steve and Mat; to James Bowman; and to Mike Capp for help with the Latin.

Catherine Bott © 2006

Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...
Search

There are no matching records. Please try again.