Please wait...

Hyperion Records

CDA67430 - Moscheles: Piano Concertos Nos 4 & 5
CDA67430
Recording details: Various dates
Federation Concert Hall, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Produced by Various producers
Engineered by Andrew Dixon
Release date: March 2005
Total duration: 71 minutes 59 seconds

'You have to hand it to Howard Shelley. It's one thing to lead a concerto from the keyboard, but to do this when the solo part is so demanding and with such insouciance is quite another thing … Completed by Henry Roche's trenchant and engaging booklet notes, this is an issue which I cannot praise too highly' (Gramophone)

'Imagine Paganini's Rossinian verve, Schumann's poetic sensibility and Mendelssohn's gentle humanity rolled into one, and you won't be far from the sound-world of these wonderful concertos' (Classic FM Magazine)

'Directing the performances from the keyboard, Shelley takes every prestidigitational hurdle with immaculate precision and aristocratic aplomb. He displays an exemplary range of touch and fluidity, communicates an intense pleasure in the music and indeed seems to revel in its abundant charm. The recording is of the same excellent standard as previous releases in this series. Listeners who have already enjoyed the other Moscheles concertos will not hesitate; if you haven't, this is a good place to start' (International Record Review)

'Pianist-conductor Howard Shelley… delivers very fine and sensitive performances on a Steinway piano. This recorded is a valuable addition for listeners interested in building their collection of nineteenth-century concertos or in tracing the history of the genre' (Nineteenth-century Music Review)

'All in all, if you're curious about this repertoire, I'd recommend you turn to the Hyperion series. This latest installment is as good a place as any to start' (Fanfare, USA)

The Romantic Piano Concerto
Piano Concertos Nos 4 & 5
Allegro maestoso  [13'12]
Adagio  [4'53]
Allegro moderato  [13'37]
Allegro vivace  [9'47]
St Patrick's Day  [3'33]

Howard Shelley’s third disc in Hyperion’s traversal of the complete extant piano concertos by Ignaz Moscheles brings us triumphant performances of the fourth and fifth concertos which are complemented by a spirited rendition of the Recollections of Ireland, composed almost by way of thanks for divine deliverance from a storm-tossed crossing of the Irish Sea in 1826.

Piano Concerto No 4 represents the culmination of Moscheles’ output in the genre during his years as a touring virtuoso, and the results are every bit as pyrotechnical as this might lead one to expect. A precurser of the Chopin and Schumann concertos, here delicious melody and rumbustious joie de vivre combine (alongside a version of The British Grenadiers) in a work of immediate and lasting appeal.

The fifth concerto is something rather different, its audaciously progressive musical language initially proving something of a turn-off for contemporary audiences expecting ‘more of the same’. However, the work bristles with virtuosic display and strong themes – every bit a tribute to its composer’s idol, Beethoven, whose own C minor concerto provides the opening motif of Moscheles’ closing movement.

Recollections of Ireland is a crowd-pleasing fantasia based on four popular Irish tunes (‘The Groves of Blarney’ being better known today as ‘The Last Rose of Summer’) and provides Moscheles ample scope to indulge his passion for a good tune – and his facility at interweaving several good tunes …

The accompanying booklet gives full details of the works, of course, and also throws down the gauntlet to the interested listener: Hyperion is committed to recording the missing Piano Concerto No 8 – if anyone can shed any light on where the music might be, many years of international searching having so far drawn a blank.


Other recommended albums
'Lyapunov: Piano Concertos' (CDA67326)
Lyapunov: Piano Concertos
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 20-bit 44.1 kHz £7.45ALAC 20-bit 44.1 kHz £7.45 CDA67326  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'Fuchs & Kiel: Piano Concertos' (CDA67354)
Fuchs & Kiel: Piano Concertos
'Moscheles: Piano Concertos Nos 1, 6 & 7' (CDA67385)
Moscheles: Piano Concertos Nos 1, 6 & 7
'Scharwenka: Piano Concertos Nos 2 & 3' (CDA67365)
Scharwenka: Piano Concertos Nos 2 & 3
'Herz: Piano Concertos Nos 1, 7 & 8' (CDA67465)
Herz: Piano Concertos Nos 1, 7 & 8

Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Ignaz Moscheles (1794–1870) was one of the finest pianist–composers of the first half of the nineteenth century. Indeed it is hardly an exaggeration to say that between 1815 and 1830 he was considered by many the supreme virtuoso of his day, for he combined technical brilliance and an unmatched depth of expressive power with true compositional and artistic mastery. His style is marked by rhythmic and melodic vivacity and charm, coupled with a ready love of the unexpected, revealing deeper hidden levels. He had in addition a loveable and generous nature, and a capacity for painstaking precision that made him an ideal mentor to generations of pupils.

He was born in 1794 in Prague to a German-speaking Jewish family; but after his father’s early death he settled in 1808 in Vienna, where his teachers were Albrechtsberger and Salieri, his friends included Meyerbeer and Hummel, and his idol and the zenith of his artistic aspirations was Beethoven. He was fortunate in being for three years Salieri’s deputy-Kapellmeister at the Opera, and his first orchestral composition seems to have been Les Portraits, a ballet whose overture already displays a delightful verve and dramatic mastery. In 1814 he was commissioned to arrange the piano score of Fidelio, and had the joy of regular visits to Beethoven for his approval or comments, coming to know him as a kind and generous friend.

In 1815 his Alexander Variations Op 32 for piano and orchestra brought sudden fame and popularity, and he embarked the following year on the life of a touring virtuoso, travelling throughout Northern and Western Europe, and paying extended visits to Paris and London. In 1824 he met and taught the young Mendelssohn in Berlin, whence arose a lifelong and intimate friendship, severed only by Mendelssohn’s death in 1847. Early next year in Hamburg he met and married the striking and cultivated Charlotte Embden, and settled for twenty-one years in London, bringing up a family of four children and establishing a dominant position as pianist, composer, conductor and teacher. He continued to tour in Britain and on the Continent; but towards 1840 he took a deliberate decision to make teaching his dominant role, and in 1846 he made a final move to Leipzig, accepting Mendelssohn’s invitation to be Director of Piano and Piano-Composition at his recently founded Conservatory.

His compositions are, like Chopin’s, predominantly for piano, but they include a symphony, an overture, some songs and a small but important body of chamber music. His eight piano concertos span the years 1818 to 1838. The earlier five concertos retain a firmly classical orientation, even though each shows different facets of the composer’s originality and exploratory bent. This is in contrast to the final three, which are among his most audaciously progressive compositions, their Romantic titles (‘Fantastique’, ‘Pathétique’ and ‘Pastorale’) betraying an increasing interest in the emotional emancipation of the 1830s.

Moscheles composed his Piano Concerto No 4 in E major, Op 64, between March and June 1823 during his third visit to England. He gave the first performance in London on 16 June, and played it during his tour of German cities in the autumn and also on his return to Vienna in November. Bearing a dedication to Empress Caroline Auguste of Austria, it is the last of the virtuoso concertos of his touring years, before the increasing bias towards expressive and innovatory musical ideas in his later concertos. Although Mozart and (especially) Beethoven can clearly be heard as primary inspirations, there is a great deal of forward-looking writing which surely points to the concerto’s being in turn a specific inspiration for Chopin’s E minor Concerto, composed in 1830.

The opening Allegro maestoso presents two clearly differentiated, but not unrelated, themes. At first it sounds as if Moscheles is repeating the elegant device from his Third Concerto of using the first theme as the accompaniment to the second – but it is only theme 1a, as it were, and the true second subject appears in its proper place, first on clarinets and flutes and then from full orchestra. Finely orchestrated Mozartian phrases link the themes in regular classical style, with a delicious woodwind passage just before the soloist’s entrance. The piano writing does full justice to the vigour of the thematic material, the intricate passagework and virtuoso repeated notes interwoven with some truly expressive cantabile writing. After a remarkable extended trill passage, the piano begins the development in G major and is soon deep in a harmonically wide-ranging fugato section, followed by two moments that startlingly foreshadow Schumann’s Piano Concerto. There are fine harmonic side-slips and a conclusion of ever-building excitement.

The Adagio opens with a broad, nobly expressive horn solo, which the piano takes up and soon begins to elaborate in increasingly decorated, even Romantic style. There is a canonic duet with the still prominent horn, who graces the music with an unexpected and lovely contrapuntal suspension, and joins in unison with the pianist towards the end of the movement, uncowed by the latter’s ostensible supremacy. Over a final tonic pedal, more trills lead the music to fade into a mist of quiet, almost impressionist arpeggios.

The horns return to usher in the finale, apparently sombre at first; but the woodwind echo has a clear military sound, and the piano soon strikes up with ‘The British Grenadiers’, which proceeds to get the full classical rondo treatment, with running triplets and Moscheles’ favourite ‘Scotch snap’ rhythm adding to the excitement. An upward semitone shift into F ushers in a quietly jazzy section, which expands into some vigorous contrapuntal writing and then suddenly switches to what sounds like a quote from Tchaikovsky. After passing through many keys, the music finally releases the brakes for a short and joyful coda.

The Piano Concerto No 5 in C major, Op 87, was the first concerto Moscheles composed after he settled in London and the first of his ‘later’ period; it is dedicated to his friend and fellow-composer Sigismund Neukomm. The work took shape over a period of several years. The first movement was composed in the summer of 1826, during a tranquil six-week holiday spent with his wife’s relations in the north German countryside. But Moscheles, deep in the creation of his 24 Studies, seems to have put the concerto to one side, the Adagio being written some five years later. The complete work was probably heard for the first time at a Philharmonic Society concert in London in March 1832. Its popularity, like that of its successors, never rivalled that of the earlier concertos, perhaps on account of the increasingly exploratory element in his musical language, and the thoughtful qualities that lend so much of the music its delicate and subtle sensibility.

The first movement, broad in conception and deeply rooted in the classical tradition, is built from simple motifs whose gentleness conceals their innate strength. The more graceful and flowing second subject shows the composer’s innocente musical character. A harmonically bold orchestral passage takes the music down into E minor, introducing a development section in which the soloist explores a wide range of tonalities and ideas. At last the oboe signals the imminent return of the opening, which however almost qualifies as another development in its own right – starting fortissimo, it follows entirely new harmonic paths, compressing and reworking the original material in a manner truly worthy of his idol Beethoven. Trumpets end the movement with a ringing restatement of the four opening notes.

The Adagio in E minor, one of the loveliest movements Moscheles ever wrote, can perhaps be seen as bridging the gap between Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony and Mendelssohn’s ‘Italian’ Symphony. Violas and a pizzicato bass support the opening cello melody, a reversal of roles that lends the tune a wonderful depth of feeling and a sort of innocent purity. We enter a more chromatic passage with tragic undertones, and then the horns introduce a passage in the major key filled with an almost religious tenderness. The mood swings between resolute confidence and deep sorrow until the orchestra dies away, leaving the piano to sing the opening theme on its own, before the horn and timpani guide the movement solemnly to a quiet ending.

The playful finale, which starts with an overt homage to Beethoven’s C minor Concerto, has at times quite a rustic flavour, particularly in the horn writing. After a pastoral theme in the dominant, there comes a specially charming figure of falling trills which serves to unite a movement in which nothing, even the fugal passage, is intended to be taken quite seriously. At one point Sullivan comes irresistibly to mind – though not yet born, he was to be Moscheles’ pupil in Leipzig. Piano and orchestra indulge in quickfire dialogue, the soloist enjoys some virtuoso fireworks, a theme returns in disguise at half-speed, and in the più mosso coda the piano completes its contribution to the proceedings with a triumphant glissando and the orchestra ends on its own.

The Fantasia Recollections of Ireland, Op 69, was written shortly after Moscheles’ three-week visit to the country in January 1826. He describes the prolonged and terrible crossing from Holyhead to Dublin in an intensely graphic passage from his diary – in the howling storm, as sea-water hissed into his cabin, he put his faith in an Almighty Providence and thought calmly of his sleeping wife and baby – ‘they will either see me again and rejoice, or bear my loss with the help of God’. His profound gratitude for a safe arrival, and his consistently enthusiastic welcome, seem to have lent a special warmth and ebullience to this work. As his appearances there generally concluded with an improvised ‘Fantasia on Irish melodies’, this published piece is no doubt a development and distillation of some of the best ideas that came to him on those occasions.

He gave the first performance in London on 7 April 1826. He also agreed to play it on 18 May at the singer Braham’s benefit concert in Covent Garden Theatre, but the performance turned out to be a highly unusual one. The first half consisted of popular songs to please the gallery, who then became so boisterous that they would not listen at all to a more serious second half. Weber conducted his overture ‘Ruler of the Spirits’ amid such a cacophony that not a note could be heard. Moscheles sat down to play boiling with indignation. ‘At the opening bar, the roughs in the gallery made themselves heard by whistling, hissing, shouting and calling out “Are you comfortable, Jack?”, accompanying the question with volleys of orange peel. In this new and unexpected situation I resolved not to come to any sudden stoppage, but to show the better part of my audience that I was ready to fulfil my engagement. I stooped down to the leading violinist and said “I shall continue to move my hands on the keyboard as though really playing. Make your band pretend to be playing also; after a short time I will give you a signal and we will leave off together.”’ As they ‘finished’ there was a hurricane of applause – ‘The gallery were glad to get rid of me!’

According to the expected norm for such fantasias, there is a stately orchestral opening where coming melodies are lightly hinted at. The piano then enters in concerto manner, with alternately vigorous and expressive, and finally virtuosic development of the same material, with echoes of a well-known tune hovering ever closer to the conscious ear. After a Beethovenian double-trill climax, the piano emerges sweetly with the famous ‘Groves of Blarney’, probably better known today as ‘The Last Rose of Summer’. The tasteful ornamentation is well suited to the tune’s simple pathos. But it is repeated in a totally different guise of softly rippling arpeggios, and this new mood continues rising and falling until resolving into an allegretto whose descending octaves soon turn into the cheerful and debonair Redcoat tune ‘Garry Owen’. As the piano discovers ever more inventive variants, the pace lightly and imperceptibly quickens, until we reach the last of the three melodies, the lovely and warm-hearted ‘St Patrick’s Day’. But Moscheles cannot resist the pleasure of combining these two tunes – as the bassoon repeats ‘St Patrick’s Day’, ‘Garry Owen’ re-enters above it. Could this interweaving of the Redcoat march with ‘St Patrick’s Day’ represent the aspiration of the intensely peace-loving Moscheles for the two disparate elements of the Irish nation to live united in harmony? Finally ‘The Groves of Blarney’ returns embroidered with both the other tunes in a sort of miniature Ivesian soundscape, and the music drives joyfully to a traditionally ebullient conclusion.

Henry Roche © 2005


Other albums in this series
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 63 – Godard' (CDA68043)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 63 – Godard
CDA68043  To be issued soon July 2014 Release  
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 1 – Moszkowski & Paderewski' (CDA66452)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 1 – Moszkowski & Paderewski
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 2 – Medtner 2 & 3' (CDA66580)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 2 – Medtner 2 & 3
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 3 – Mendelssohn' (CDA66567)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 3 – Mendelssohn
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 4 – Arensky & Bortkiewicz' (CDA66624)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 4 – Arensky & Bortkiewicz
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 5 – Balakirev & Rimsky-Korsakov' (CDA66640)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 5 – Balakirev & Rimsky-Korsakov
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 6 – Dohnányi' (CDA66684)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 6 – Dohnányi
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 7 – Alkan & Henselt' (CDA66717)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 7 – Alkan & Henselt
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 8 – Medtner 1 & Quintet' (CDA66744)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 8 – Medtner 1 & Quintet
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 9 – Albert' (CDA66747)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 9 – Albert
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 10 – Weber' (CDA66729)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 10 – Weber
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 11 – Sauer & Scharwenka' (CDA66790)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 11 – Sauer & Scharwenka
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 12 – Parry & Stanford' (CDA66820)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 12 – Parry & Stanford
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 13 – Glazunov & Goedicke' (CDA66877)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 13 – Glazunov & Goedicke
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 14 – Litolff 2 & 4' (CDA66889)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 14 – Litolff 2 & 4
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 15 – Hahn & Massenet' (CDA66897)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 15 – Hahn & Massenet
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 16 – Huss & Schelling' (CDA66949)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 16 – Huss & Schelling
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 17 – Mendelssohn' (CDA66969)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 17 – Mendelssohn
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 18 – Korngold & Marx' (CDA66990)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 18 – Korngold & Marx
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 19 – Mackenzie & Tovey' (CDA67023)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 19 – Mackenzie & Tovey
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 20 – Brüll' (CDA67069)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 20 – Brüll
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 21 – Dreyschock & Kullak' (CDA67086)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 21 – Dreyschock & Kullak
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 22 – Busoni' (CDA67143)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 22 – Busoni
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 23 – Holbrooke & Wood' (CDA67127)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 23 – Holbrooke & Wood
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 24 – Vianna da Motta' (CDA67163)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 24 – Vianna da Motta
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 24-bit 44.1 kHz £9.00ALAC 24-bit 44.1 kHz £9.00 CDA67163  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 25 – MacDowell' (CDA67165)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 25 – MacDowell
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 26 – Litolff' (CDA67210)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 26 – Litolff
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 20-bit 44.1 kHz £8.50ALAC 20-bit 44.1 kHz £8.50 CDA67210  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 27 – Saint-Saëns' (CDA67331/2)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 27 – Saint-Saëns
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 28 – Stojowski' (CDA67314)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 28 – Stojowski
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 29 – Moscheles' (CDA67276)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 29 – Moscheles
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 30 – Lyapunov' (CDA67326)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 30 – Lyapunov
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 20-bit 44.1 kHz £7.45ALAC 20-bit 44.1 kHz £7.45 CDA67326  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 31 – Fuchs & Kiel' (CDA67354)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 31 – Fuchs & Kiel
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 32 – Moscheles' (CDA67385)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 32 – Moscheles
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 33 – Scharwenka' (CDA67365)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 33 – Scharwenka
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 34 – Pierné' (CDA67348)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 34 – Pierné
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 35 – Herz' (CDA67465)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 35 – Herz
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 37 – Nápravník & Blumenfeld' (CDA67511)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 37 – Nápravník & Blumenfeld
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 20-bit 44.1 kHz £7.45ALAC 20-bit 44.1 kHz £7.45 CDA67511  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 38 – Rubinstein & Scharwenka' (CDA67508)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 38 – Rubinstein & Scharwenka
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 24-bit 48 kHz £7.85ALAC 24-bit 48 kHz £7.85 CDA67508  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 39 – Delius & Ireland' (CDA67296)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 39 – Delius & Ireland
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 40 – Herz' (CDA67537)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 40 – Herz
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 41 – Kalkbrenner' (CDA67535)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 41 – Kalkbrenner
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 42 – Alnæs & Sinding' (CDA67555)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 42 – Alnæs & Sinding
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 43 – Bennett & Bache' (CDA67595)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 43 – Bennett & Bache
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 44 – Melcer-Szczawinski' (CDA67630)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 44 – Melcer-Szczawinski
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 45 – Hiller' (CDA67655)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 45 – Hiller
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 46 – Bowen' (CDA67659)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 46 – Bowen
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 47 – Draeseke & Jadassohn' (CDA67636)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 47 – Draeseke & Jadassohn
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 48 – Benedict & Macfarren' (CDA67720)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 48 – Benedict & Macfarren
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 49 – Stenhammar' (CDA67750)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 49 – Stenhammar
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 50 – Tchaikovsky' (CDA67711/2)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 50 – Tchaikovsky
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 51 – Taubert & Rosenhain' (CDA67765)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 51 – Taubert & Rosenhain
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 52 – Goetz & Wieniawski' (CDA67791)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 52 – Goetz & Wieniawski
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 53 – Reger & Strauss' (CDA67635)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 53 – Reger & Strauss
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 54 – Somervell & Cowen' (CDA67837)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 54 – Somervell & Cowen
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 55 – Widor' (CDA67817)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 55 – Widor
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 56 – Kalkbrenner' (CDA67843)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 56 – Kalkbrenner
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 57 – Wiklund' (CDA67828)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 57 – Wiklund
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 58 – Pixis & Thalberg' (CDA67915)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 58 – Pixis & Thalberg
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 59 – Zarzycki & Żeleński' (CDA67958)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 59 – Zarzycki & Żeleński
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 24-bit 96 kHz £10.50ALAC 24-bit 96 kHz £10.50 CDA67958  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 60 – Dubois' (CDA67931)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 60 – Dubois
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 24-bit 96 kHz £12.00ALAC 24-bit 96 kHz £12.00 CDA67931  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 61' (CDA67950)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 61
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 24-bit 96 kHz £10.50ALAC 24-bit 96 kHz £10.50 CDA67950  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 62 – Gounod' (CDA67975)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 62 – Gounod
MP3 £6.99FLAC £6.99ALAC £6.99Buy by post £10.50 Studio Master: FLAC 24-bit 96 kHz £10.50ALAC 24-bit 96 kHz £10.50 CDA67975  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Show: MP3 FLAC ALAC
   English   Français   Deutsch