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Hyperion Records

CDA67385 - Moscheles: Piano Concertos Nos 1, 6 & 7
CDA67385
Recording details: September 1999
ABC Odeon, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Produced by David Garrett & Howard Shelley
Engineered by Andrew Dixon
Release date: May 2003
Total duration: 61 minutes 18 seconds

'Shelley’s expertise, his immaculate charm and brio cast a brilliant light on every page. His Tasmanian orchestra is with him all the way and Hyperion’s sound and balance are of demonstration quality. An exemplary issue; I can scarcely wait for Volume 3' (Gramophone)

'a thoroughly enjoyable disc' (BBC Music Magazine)

'played with a taste and vivacity that reflect the temperament of the music … The thing that strikes you most about this music is its lively originality' (The Daily Telegraph)

'I defy anyone not to be captivated by this delightful, witty, rhythmically vital and spontaneously inventive work, especially when played as stylishly as here' (International Record Review)

'Howard Shelley and the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra give solid accounts of these intriguing scores' (The Times)

'Shelley’s nimble, elegant playing, while leading his excellent Tasmanian players, is a musical wonder' (Classic FM Magazine)

'Howard Shelley's account of the First, Sixth and Seventh of the eight Moscheles piano concertos provides powerful argument for their return to the repertoire' (International Piano)

'This disc … boldly captures the irresistible energy and sanguine life of Moscheles’ music' (Music Week)

'freshly performed and directed by Howard Shelley … No need for Hyperion to do anything other than hold their heads high over this one' (MusicWeb International)

The Romantic Piano Concerto
Piano Concertos Nos 1, 6 & 7
Allegro maestoso  [9'14]
Adagio  [6'33]
Allegro agitato  [1'17]
Vivace  [3'59]
[untitled]  [11'28]
Allegro agitato  [3'46]
Allegro con brio  [6'56]

The continuation of our survey of Moscheles piano concertos brings us to three works which have never been recorded before. The 1st Concerto, written in 1819, is a very Mozartean affair; though the young composer had become a friend of Beethoven it seems the example of that composer's last three concertos hadn't been followed, instead we have a work full of charm, grace and untroubled lyrical melody.

For his final three concertos (6,7 & 8) Moscheles broke away from the traditional three-movement structure and produced works that presage Liszt in their combination of fast and slow movements in one structure. These works, written in London in the 1830s, show that at that time Moscheles, later regarded as a traditionalist, was then at the forefront of the developing Romantic movement in music. The lessons of Beethoven, so absent in his first concerto, are now clearly learned. Howard Shelley has already proved himself the perfect exponent of the repertoire which bridges the classical and romantic period in music. His first Moscheles recording (Concertos 2 & 3 and 'Anticipations of Scotland') has met with universal acclaim and this release will surely follow.


Other recommended albums
'Moscheles: Piano Concertos Nos 2 & 3' (CDA67276)
Moscheles: Piano Concertos Nos 2 & 3
'Scharwenka: The Complete Chamber Music' (CDD22046)
Scharwenka: The Complete Chamber Music
MP3 £7.99FLAC £7.99ALAC £7.99Buy by post £10.50 CDD22046  2CDs Dyad (2 for the price of 1)  
'Busoni: Piano Concerto' (CDA67143)
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'MacDowell: Piano Concertos' (CDA67165)
MacDowell: Piano Concertos
'Lyapunov: Piano Concertos' (CDA67326)
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Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Ignaz Moscheles (1794-1870) was one of the finest pianist-composers of the first half of the nineteenth century. Indeed it is hardly an exaggeration to say that between 1815 and 1830 he was considered by many the supreme virtuoso of his day, for he combined technical brilliance and an unmatched depth of expressive power with true compositional and artistic mastery. His style is marked by rhythmic and melodic vivacity and charm, coupled with a ready love of the unexpected, revealing deeper hidden levels. He had in addition a loveable and generous nature, and a capacity for painstaking precision that made him an ideal mentor to generations of pupils.

Moscheles was born in 1794 in Prague to a German-speaking Jewish family; but after his father’s early death he settled in 1808 in Vienna, where his teachers were Albrechtsberger and Salieri, his friends included Meyerbeer and Hummel, and his idol and the zenith of his artistic aspirations was Beethoven. He was fortunate in being for three years Salieri’s deputy-Kapellmeister at the Opera, and his first orchestral composition seems to have been Les Portraits, a ballet whose overture already displays a delightful verve and dramatic mastery. In 1814 he was commissioned to arrange the piano score of Fidelio, and had the joy of regular visits to Beethoven for his approval or comments, coming to know him as a kind and generous friend.

In 1815 his Alexander Variations Op 32 for piano and orchestra brought sudden fame and popularity, and he embarked the following year on the life of a touring virtuoso, travelling throughout Northern and Western Europe, and paying extended visits to Paris and London. In 1824 he met and taught the young Mendelssohn in Berlin, whence arose a lifelong and intimate friendship, severed only by Mendelssohn’s death in 1847. Early next year in Hamburg he met and married the striking and cultivated Charlotte Embden, and settled for twenty-one years in London, bringing up a family of four children and establishing a dominant position as pianist, composer, conductor and teacher. He continued to tour in Britain and on the continent; but towards 1840 he took a deliberate decision to make teaching his dominant role, and in 1846 he made a final move to Leipzig, accepting Mendelssohn’s invitation to be Director of Piano and Piano-Composition at his recently founded Conservatory.

His compositions are, like Chopin’s, predominantly for piano, but they include a symphony, an overture, some songs and a small but important body of chamber music. His eight piano concertos span the years 1818 to 1838. The earlier five concertos retain a firmly classical orientation, even though each shows different facets of the composer’s originality and exploratory bent. But the final three are among his most audaciously progressive compositions, and their Romantic titles (Fantastique, Pathétique and Pastorale) betray an increasing interest in the emotional emancipation of the 1830s. Each of the three offers a novel and fascinating solution to the loosening of classical form; yet their questing and experimental nature is always kept under control by a succinctness of invention that compresses a remarkable range of ideas within a relatively short time-span. It is notable that none of the three contains a cadenza.

The Piano Concerto No 1 in F major appeared first in 1818, and was published the following year under the title of ‘Society Concerto’ (Gesellschafts-Konzert) with a dedication to Count von Appony. Moscheles returned to it in 1823 and issued a revised version for future publications. It stands alone among his concertos for its restraint and lack of technical ostentation, and its nearly classical purity points to its being designed at least partly for his pupils. The perceptive listener cannot fail to recognise the deeply ingrained influence of Mozart’s concertos, above all in the structural perfection, but also at times in the orchestration (note the treatment of the horns near the end of the first movement and especially in the finale). But the music exudes an ebullience, a sunny quality of unfettered joy, which makes the phrase ‘Haydn meets Rossini’ come almost more aptly to mind. It is notable that Rossini told Moscheles in 1860 that he had enough flow of melody to write an opera (Moscheles’ rejoinder was “What a pity that I am not young enough to become your pupil!”). The opera remained unwritten, but the piano’s beautiful A minor melody at the start of the slow movement reveals a love and sure understanding of the cantando style. It is repeated later by the orchestra, hauntingly simplified, and supported by pianistic embroidery; the movement rises to a magically quiet A major close. The Rondo brims with happiness and wit, accelerating towards the end and even including a miniature ‘Rossini crescendo’ as if as a culmination of the audience’s pleasure.

Piano Concerto No 6 (‘Fantastique’) in B flat major was published as Op 90 in 1834 with a dedication to Miss Barlow. It received its first performance earlier the same year at the Philharmonic Society in London, where it was rather coolly received, in contrast to the enormous enthusiasm when Moscheles played it in Leipzig in October the following year. Although the movements follow the usual established pattern, each is joined to the next to form a continuous whole, and the many thematic links give the work an overall structural unity highly original for its time. Schumann in his review of the concerto considered the dangers of such an ‘unstable form’ outweighed the benefits, but declared it nonetheless thoroughly well-written and effective.

The orchestra’s opening three-note rising motif, stated forcefully and then in a quieter legato version, pervades the entire movement in different transmutations. The soloist’s entry injects a new rhythmic and melodic energy, which leaves the orchestra temporarily nonplussed, but they soon join forces to weave the motif into a lyrical melody. This is developed more contrapuntally by the piano, until a triplet figure emerges to form the basis for the second main thematic section, and the music settles into D major. Off goes the soloist in virtuoso fashion, until the orchestra breaks in again with a striking continuous triplet passage in Beethovenian/Mendelssohnian style, modulating deep into the flat keys. It sounds as if we have reached a recapitulation in B flat minor; but the piano resumes with growing urgency (dolente, appassionato and con smania), moving into the dominant of G minor – and we find ourselves suddenly in the second movement, a gentle triple-time Andante in dotted rhythm. This develops in expressive power before melting into a more pastoral second half in G major, where a fluid decorative figure eventually leads seamlessly into what looks like a short vigorous C minor Scherzo in 12/8. But this is in fact a pianistic bridge between Andante and finale, constructed of motifs from the first movement. It slips into D minor, the triplets build in ferocity and the B flat finale bursts forth, a four-square but wild and impetuous gipsy-like romp marked strepitoso and peppered with sotto voce interruptions. It is in this movement that Moscheles’ native good humour is given freest rein. The syncopated and more straightforwardly rustic second theme later combines with a rising woodwind melody, again derived from the first movement. A side-slip into E major, some Beethovenian trills, and the soloist races energetically towards the finish, with a final sideways glance at the triplet motif of the first movement.

Although the first movement of the Piano Concerto No 7 (‘Pathétique’) in C minor was heard in May 1835 in London, the first performance of the complete concerto took place in October that year in Leipzig, where Mendelssohn had recently taken the directorship of the Gewandhaus concerts. It was dedicated to his old friend the pianist and composer Meyerbeer. The London premiere was given in May 1836, with performances also in the two following years. Of the Leipzig concert the usually restrained Moscheles wrote to his wife ‘The crowd was immense … the Concertos Fantastique and Pathétique were received with immense applause, and my duet with Felix created a regular furore.’ Mendelssohn sent her his own account, saying ‘the room was the most crowded we have had for years – the shouts of applause began directly after his Concerto Fantastique, and the noise lasted throughout the evening. And Moscheles in his extempore playing produced some things bordering on witchcraft, which to this day I have not been able to understand, although he pretends they were nothing.’

This is another carefully organised and highly original work, the second of the three movements being a scherzo and Andante entwined together. Schumann noted ‘The formal divergence from others’ and the composer’s own previous concertos will strike everyone immediately’, while Moscheles himself wrote of it in 1853 ‘To the best of my belief, it is not only in advance of my former compositions in form and style, but a mature work, and yet it has remained comparatively unnoticed!’

The Allegro maestoso opens with a muffled staccato bass over which a clarinet melody arches upwards. It is complemented by the expressive fall of the major-key second subject, presented by the orchestra and taken up by the soloist. The piano introduces a more humorous dotted-rhythm tune, and then embarks on a passage in driving but expressive semiquaver-rhythm, leading eventually to the development section – though as often with Moscheles the normal boundaries of the classical ‘sections’ are deliberately ambiguous. From this point the tonality starts to slip its classical bonds, edging through D flat up into D and then into F minor. It sounds like the recapitulation, but we remain gloriously unsure until the repeat of the second subject in the home key of C major. The minor key at length returns, the staccato bass is heard and a fascinating coda of tranquilly flowing septuplets leads to the orchestra’s resolute conclusion.

A staccato bass again introduces the second movement, an audaciously original mingling of scherzo and slow movement into one. After the A flat scherzo opening, a ballad-like Andante interrupts in B, the scherzo resumes in D, and finally the andante re-enters in C, slides up into D flat and astonishingly subsumes the scherzo into its own being. It builds in agitation, and a pregnant pause ushers in the startlingly closely related C minor finale. This is somewhat of a homage to Beethoven, but the contrasting second theme tellingly foreshadows Schumann’s Piano Quintet. Very Schumannesque too is the contrapuntal blending of this theme with a nobly rising orchestral motif. (Schumann always greatly admired Moscheles as composer and pianist, although interestingly he greeted Moscheles’ only Symphony of 1829 with extremely faint praise, not imagining that it foreshadowed his own future symphonic writing.) The concluding pages of the concerto are sprinkled with some of Moscheles’ most passionate directions – con furia, con abbandono, frenetico and finally con disperazione.

Henry Roche © 2003


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