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Hyperion Records

CDA67537 - Herz: Piano Concertos Nos 3, 4 & 5
CDA67537

Recording details: September 2004
Federation Concert Hall, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Produced by Ben Connellan & David Garrett
Engineered by Andrew Dixon
Release date: April 2006
Total duration: 68 minutes 41 seconds

GRAMOPHONE EDITOR'S CHOICE

'Here, magnificently performed and recorded, is music to set heads nodding and feet tapping, the epitome of art which scorns profundity and elevates pianistic acrobatics to a high and elegant plane' (Gramophone)

'Howard Shelley is well up to the considerable technical challenges that these works present and, apart from phrasing intelligently himself, persuades the orchestra to follow suit. In all, a disc that looks on the bright side of life' (BBC Music Magazine)

'These charming concertos, the second of three volumes conducted by Shelley from the keyboard, are just the thing to set the feet tapping' (The Observer)

'As on the previous release, Howard Shelley is both soloist and director. It would be hard to think of a more persuasive advocate. His passagework, however technically demanding the music, is always crystalline, and the sound is consistently warm and brilliant' (International Record Review)

'There's tremendous pleasure to be had from the music's sheer charm … and even more from its outbursts of exuberance. Unless you're on a strict musical diet that allows no dessert, this release, like its predecessor, will lift your spirits' (Fanfare, USA)

'Shelley has so much surplus energy that he can lift these entertaining works up to a level where they are so much more than just audible. They are at times even touching and beautiful' (Pianist)

The Romantic Piano Concerto
Piano Concertos Nos 3, 4 & 5
Allegro moderato  [14'59]
Allegro moderato  [9'20]
Allegro moderato  [5'49]
Andantino  [4'34]

Hyperion’s record of the month for April is the much-anticipated second instalment of Howard Shelley’s premiere recordings of Henri Herz’s piano concertos.

Herz never tried to be a ‘great’ artist, though he was often judged against such criteria; he was an entertainer. Of course the concerto lends itself perfectly to this role and his eight concertos are full of charm, almost operatic melody and scintillating virtuosity. Needless to say Howard Shelley, who has made such exceptional recordings of the concertos of Hummel and Moscheles, is just the man for the job. If we can accept that music need not be profound to be enjoyed we should join the international music press in welcoming this revival of these works, the pop music of their time.


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Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Heinrich Herz was born in Vienna on 6 January 1803 (some sources say 1806), the son of a musician who gave him his first lessons. After further studies in Coblenz with the organist father of the pianist–composer Franz Hünten, Herz entered the Paris Conservatoire. His teachers here were Louis Pradère, Anton Reicha and Victor Dourlen. In his first year, Herz carried off first prize for piano playing. A visit to Paris in 1821 by the great pianist, composer and pedagogue Ignaz Moscheles proved a strong influence on his own style.

Having become a Parisian, Heinrich became Henri. For the rest of his life the French capital remained the base from which he conducted a hugely successful career as a pianist, composer, teacher, inventor and piano manufacturer. From the early 1820s and for the next decade, Herz enjoyed a reputation that is hard to reconcile with the current neglect of his music and low critical reputation. Neither Liszt, Chopin, Thalberg nor any other pianist—with the exceptions of Moscheles and Kalkbrenner—rivalled Herz as the most fashionable and sensational pianist of the day. His music commanded three or four times the price of his nearest rivals, none of whom outsold him until the 1840s. As Sir George Grove observed: ‘Herz found out what the public liked and what would pay, and this he gave to them.’ Besides eight piano concertos, he wrote for the instrument in every recognizable form including an immense number of variations, more than 200 opus numbers in all. ‘Is Herz prejudiced’, asked Mendelssohn, ‘when he says the Parisians can understand nothing but variations?’

Schumann was beside himself at Herz’s success and lost no opportunity to poke fun at him in the pages of his Neue Zeitschrift für Musik. The pages of the Revue et Gazette Musicale, owned by Herz’s sometime publisher Moritz Schlesinger, never referred to Herz except in the most slighting terms. The composer had, it is thought, asked for more money than the wily Schlesinger was willing to pay and the two conducted a lengthy feud. Schlesinger even fought a duel with a fiery Herz loyalist, wounded him and was subsequently fined fifty francs for defamation.

Herz might have restricted himself to playing little but his own music, yet there is no doubt of his prowess as a pianist, underlined by the hugely demanding solo parts of the present concertos written to exploit his particular gifts. He was praised not only for his bravura and power of execution but also for ‘that special kind of sensuously charming touch which differentiated the Parisian school from the brilliant playing of the Viennese and the emotional style of the English’ (Oscar Bie).

In the late 1830s, Herz teamed up with a Parisian piano manufacturer named Klepfa. The venture failed but, despite losing a large amount of money, Herz established a piano factory of his own with instruments that incorporated his valuable improvements on Erard’s revolutionary double-escapement action. He also built a concert hall on the premises in the Rue de la Victoire and though, in the beginning, some performers tried to rent it on condition that they did not have to play a Herz piano, by 1844 the business was a success, producing 400 instruments a year.

In 1845, in order to obtain more capital and recoup some of his earlier losses, Herz undertook the first American tour by an important European pianist, paving the way for Thalberg, Gottschalk (American-born but Paris-trained) and Anton Rubinstein. His journey, entertainingly described in his Mes Voyages en Amérique (published in Paris in 1866), took him through the United States, Mexico and the West Indies. By the time he returned home in 1851 Herz was a wealthy man. He was able to expand his piano factory, winning first prize with one of his instruments at the 1855 Exposition Universelle. In 1874 he relinquished his post as professor of piano at the Paris Conservatoire, one he had held since 1842. He died in 1888.

For a more detailed account of Herz’s career, see volume 35 of The Romantic Piano Concerto (Hyperion CDA67465), featuring Herz’s piano concertos Nos 1, 7 and 8.

Herz’s concertos are about as far away from those of Beethoven, Schumann and the rest of the German school as it is possible to be. Teutonic dominance of European classical music since the mid-nineteenth century has, very largely, been responsible for the view that profundity and solemnity is somehow worthier than and preferable to joyful exuberance and high-spirited display. Long before Herz had died, his music had been dismissed as superficial and irrelevant. That is a shame, for hearing these three piano concertos is to enjoy scintillating piano-writing, melodic fecundity and imaginative orchestration. They remind us that good, even great, music can possess the simple function of entertaining and lifting the spirits. It does not always have to be an invitation for navel gazing or ‘lending dignity to our own sense of self-pity’ (Kenneth Tynan).

Herz made his first visit to London in 1833 playing at the Philharmonic, Hanover Square, on 10 June, giving a concert in which he played duets with Moscheles and Cramer. He returned two years later for the premiere of his Piano Concerto No 3 in D minor Op 87 (1835), dedicated to the Philharmonic Society of London.

The first movement (Allegro moderato) might seem like a heady mixture of Hummel, Chopin, Moscheles, Mendelssohn and Kalkbrenner. But no. It is all and none of these. This is Herz, King of the Parisian school of elegance and dexterity, writing to wow the public with sensational acrobatics and graceful melodies—and making the most of the newly extended keyboard. The dominating key is D minor though in the course of its nearly fifteen minutes duration we take in F major (for the first statement of its lovely second subject), A flat major, F minor (for the unexpected central cantabile, con dolore section), G sharp minor, B flat major (briefly) and finally D major. The tempo and character of the music change just as frequently.

Herz follows this with a theme of striking simplicity for his Andantino sostenuto (to be played cantabile con amore), a lullaby reminiscent of some Scottish air. It is brutally interrupted by the piano’s outburst of fortissimo double octaves before a fermata and a transition from F major to D major for the opening theme again, this time decorated with the piano’s leggiero pianissimo demisemiquavers. The modulation to the home key is preceded by a left-hand octave tremolo using the bottom C of the keyboard—three octaves below middle C—a rarity for this period. The theme’s final treatment has the upper part of the right hand playing the melody, the lower part simultaneously playing a trill, while the left hand crosses over to play arpeggiated figures as high as top F (three octaves above middle C).

The route-map of the concerto’s Allegro finale (con fuoco ed appassionato) is as surprising as it is original, a potpourri that can hardly fail to bring a smile to the lips. The strident octave first subject in D minor is followed by a fugal section for strings only leading to a delightful third subject in A major (dolce e scherzando) to be played lusingando (caressingly). What next? A march of course!—orchestra only, brillante e sonore, triangle and percussion to the fore, as if straight out of a Meyerbeer opera. The soloist leads us thrillingly back to the first subject, then to a repeat of the fugue (this time in F sharp minor and with the piano’s contribution) and a return to the scherzando subject (in D major) which, after a brilliant transition passage, leads to the coda using the march again.

Though shorter than the Third Concerto and more conservative in its structure, Herz’s Piano Concerto No 4 in E major Op 131 (1843) holds many surprises and unconventional passages. The pivotal material for the first movement (Allegro moderato) is the jaunty and infuriatingly catchy second subject introduced by the strings and woodwind in the lengthy exposition. It is subjected to a number of treatments during which Herz allows the soloist little time to pause for breath. The moment for this comes after a passage of trills and suspended harmonies of which Hummel would have been proud. This would seem to lead inevitably to the movement’s conclusion. Instead Herz proceeds with a transitional eight ritenuto bars, underlined by hushed timpani rolls, to a solo passage in G major marked Lento e senza tempo, come una improvisazione.

After a cadenza, this in turn takes us without pause to the slow movement in C major—Andante cantabile in 9/8—and another of Herz’s simple, delectable melodies. The second part of this theme (in E flat major) disturbs the tranquil waters with surging scales and arpeggios. Having repeated the process with a further procession of busy leggiero and espressivo passagework, the music drifts to a gentle conclusion.

To follow that, Herz offers a lively 2/4 ‘Russian Rondo accompanied by a clochette’ in E minor. Its irresistible course is contrasted not by a lyrical theme as in the archetypal Romantic concerto but by a sprightly repeated-note dance tune. Some brilliantly effective writing for the soloist leads to a tutti and a lusingando (again) bridge in which the clochette re-introduces the rondo theme. When the dance theme returns it is in E major, the key in which the work ends triumphantly.

Herz may fall back on his bag of pianistic tricks, but he is nothing if not unpredictable in the way in which he chooses to use them. In the even briefer Piano Concerto No 5 in F minor Op 180 (1854) the opening of the first movement (Allegro moderato), far from being an attention-grabbing exposition, is a hesitant, rhapsodic prelude. The soloist’s initial theme has a close affinity with that of the last movement (could it be that Herz wrote the finale first?). We are almost halfway through the movement when another of the composer’s heartfelt melodies appears, leading to a beguiling scherzo subject, soon abandoned for a curt transformation of the expressive melody into the material for the fiery coda.

Clarinets, trumpets, trombones and kettle drum are silent for the Andantino that follows, the stage set by a chorus for horns and bassoon. The piano’s theme is an enchanting operatic cantilena (or so it sounds) which moves from its home key of E major to a central section in C sharp minor before returning for the cantilena to be taken up by a solo cello and flute in unison. All appears to be heading towards a serene conclusion. The final two bars disabuse the dreamy listener. Herz clearly had a sense of humour.

The finale (Allegro agitato) is a lively rondo in 6/8 which has a graceful second theme in the same metre but in the relative major. This is developed with some brilliant passagework (the trombones are put to work) before the main theme again, and a repeat of the second subject, now in F major. Without a pause, this tune is played in 2/4. Herz is surely going to conclude proceedings in this way. But no. He reverts back to 6/8 and, still in F major, uses the Rondo theme for a sprint to the finish.

Jeremy Nicholas © 2006


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