Please wait...

Hyperion Records

CDA67465 - Herz: Piano Concertos Nos 1, 7 & 8
CDA67465

Recording details: September 2003
Federation Concert Hall, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia
Produced by David Garrett
Engineered by Andrew Dixon
Release date: June 2004
DISCID: 830D9C09
Total duration: 57 minutes 50 seconds

'There are few more dextrous or musicianly pianists then Shelley … and I am more than grateful for an artist who, like Herz himself, can make you think 'that a bird had escaped from his fingers and went undulating and singing through the air' (The New York Times in 1946)' (Gramophone)

'If you've enjoyed previous volumes in Hyperion's Romantic Piano Concerto Series, you'll certainly warm to this delightful release' (BBC Music Magazine)

'Howard Shelley, who performs the dual role of piano soloist and orchestral director, delights in the charm and the considerable technical challenge of it all, and with his always fluent and controlled fingerwork, he makes it sound easy' (International Record Review)

'Shelley and the Tasmanians are persuasive advocates for these three piano concertos: this is charming, tuneful music, deftly orchestrated by a man who obviously knew his Chopin, Rossini and, in the nocturne-like slow movements, John Field' (The Sunday Times)

'Shelley makes even the most plainspun of phrases sound like long-lost treasure being discovered anew. First-rate accompaniment and resplendent sonics round out an unexpected delight' (Classic FM Magazine)

'… Shelley et les Tasmaniens jouent avec une verve, une beauté de sonorité, un noble abandon qui attisent les bravos' (Diapason, France)

The Romantic Piano Concerto
Piano Concertos Nos 1, 7 & 8
Allegro moderato  [12'26]
Larghetto  [4'59]
Allegro moderato  [8'21]
Allegro moderato  [6'40]
Andantino  [3'25]
Polonaise  [5'21]

Hyperion’s Record of the Month for June sees the thirty-fifth release in our award-winning Romantic Piano Concerto series, and three première recordings of concertos by Henri Herz.

Over the years Herz has had a very bad press, a situation begun through the writings of Robert Schumann and continued ever since, yet in his day—and this was primarily in the early part of his life—his music outsold all rivals, and his tours, particularly as the first major pianist to visit the USA, brought him huge success. This dichotomy is easily explained: Herz never tried to be a ‘great’ artist, though he was often judged against such criteria; he was an entertainer. Of course the concerto lends itself perfectly to this role and his eight concertos are full of charm, almost operatic melody and scintillating virtuosity, their model is Hummel, though in the later works Herz put less emphasis on virtuosity and more on lyricism. If we can accept that music need not be profound to be enjoyed we should welcome this revival of these works, the pop music of their time.

Needless to say Howard Shelley, who has made such exceptional recordings of the concertos of Hummel and Moscheles, is just the man for the job. He will follow up this recording with a second disc of Herz next year.


Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Herz clings by his well-manicured fingertips to the hem of the elegant tailcoat of piano literature. He published more than two hundred works over the years, commanding for them more than three or four times the price of his superior contemporaries. Schumann, his most pitiless critic, ‘thrilled with anger’ at the knowledge that ‘Herz, the stenographer, […] makes four hundred dollars by a set of variations, while Marschner scarcely obtained more for the entire opera of Hans Heiling’. For twelve years, until the late 1830s, no other composer whatsoever outsold him. Yet the recording of the present three concertos brings to a total of just eight the number of Herz compositions that have ever been recorded commercially. Of these, only his Variations on ‘Non più mesta’ from Rossini’s La Cenerentola (Earl Wild’s dazzling legerdemain) and his contribution to Liszt’s Hexameron (variation IV), remain in the catalogue. Frank Cooper’s 1971 recording of the Variations on the March from Bellini’s I Puritani, the Variations on the National March ‘La Parisienne’ and the Etude in A flat, Op 153 No 2 (‘Au bord du lac’) has yet to appear on CD. To apply the words of J B Priestley on another composer, ‘in his heyday [Herz] had his triumphs, but every garland has been dust these many years’.

And Herz certainly had his triumphs. He was nothing if not industrious: apart from his prodigious output of music (eight piano concertos, sonatas, rondos, nocturnes, dances, marches, potpourris, paraphrases and fantasias), his virtuoso hands swept him to the heights of pianistic stardom in Europe and America; he became one of the most successful piano manufacturers of the age, equalling, though not excelling, the great firms of Érard and Pleyel; he invented the ‘Dactylion’, a frightful device for strengthening the fingers, as well as producing a staggering ‘1000 Exercices pour l’emploi du Dactylion’; he published in 1866 an amusing memoir, Mes Voyages en Amérique, a reprint of his letters to the Moniteur Universel. All this in addition to his teaching. In his early years, he took on more pupils than he could handle. In 1828, when one pupil applied for lessons with Herz, the only time available was five o’clock – in the morning. ‘M. Henri Herz, No 38, Rue de la Victoire’, Le Corsaire poked fun in 1838, ‘[gives lessons] at midnight, just as well as six o’clock in the morning – while drinking, while walking, while reposing, while, in fact, doing anything. It sometimes happens that he wakes in the night and asks his valet de chambre if there is a pupil in the anteroom.’ After his touring days were over, he taught for twenty-five years at the Paris Conservatoire.

Herz was born in Vienna; most sources cite the year of his birth as 1803, though a surprisingly large number state 1806. Heinrich, as he was christened (he himself adopted Henri having become thoroughly ‘Parisienned’ by his teens), was the son of a musician who gave Herz his first lessons. After further studies in Coblenz with the father of the pianist-composer Franz Hünten – not with Hünten himself as is sometimes stated erroneously – Herz entered the Paris Conservatoire in 1816. His teachers here were the pianist Louis Barthélemy Pradère (1781–1843), Anton Reicha (1770–1836, the eminent theorist and flautist) and the composer Victor Dourlen (1780–1864). In his first year, Herz carried off the prize for piano playing. Paris remained his home, spiritually and artistically, for the remainder of his life. It was a visit to the French capital in 1821 by Ignaz Moscheles and their subsequent friendship that had much influence on developing Herz’s style.

For the next ten years and more, Herz enjoyed an immense reputation in Paris beyond anything that Liszt, Chopin or Thalberg had achieved, vying with Kalkbrenner for the title of most fashionable and sensational pianist of the age. In 1833 he made his London debut, playing at the Philharmonic and then in a concert of duets with Moscheles and J B Cramer. His next visit to Britain took him as far afield as Edinburgh and Dublin. At about the same time, Herz joined in a piano manufacturing business with a Parisian maker named Klepfa. The venture failed but, nothing daunted despite losing an immense amount of money, Herz established a piano factory of his own. In 1845, in order to obtain the necessary capital and recoup some of his losses, he undertook a tour of America. In this, he became the first important European pianist to play in the States. Though fellow pianist Leopold de Meyer preceded him by a year, this description of him in one musical dictionary is typical of the reaction he elicited: ‘As a performer he was demonstrative to a degree that the risible muscles of the audience were frequently called into activity.’ In the event, Herz’s visit lasted until 1851 taking in the whole of the United States, Mexico and the West Indies – a trail-blazer for Louis Moreau Gottschalk who would make his adult American debut in 1853 and make a similarly extensive peregrination.

The stories recounted by Herz in Mes Voyages en Amérique make one thoroughly warm to their author, clearly as amiable and charming as his music. P T Barnum, for a short period the manager of Jenny Lind, approached Herz in New York to play the piano at a concert in which the celebrated singer was to appear as an angel descending from heaven. ‘This proposition staggered even M. Herz and he declined it’, reported one commentator, though Herz was destined to be subjected to many more startling propositions at the hands of his wily manager Bernard Ullmann. In Philadelphia, the pianist arrived to find a concert announced, its main attraction being that it would be ‘illuminated by one thousand candles’. To his horror, Herz discovered that he was to be the pianist at this affair, but the prospect ‘excited such a curiosity in the Americans … that in less than a day the hall was sold out’. At the end of the first number, one member of the audience shouted out that there were eight candles short of the advertised number, demanded his money back and left the hall. ‘In competition with music, the candles won the palm.’ Another of Ullmann’s visions was the patriotic concert. After a Hommage à Washington (soloists, chorus, five orchestras, 1800 singers), Herz would play his specially commissioned Concerto de la Constitution, followed by a patriotic speech, a Grande marche triomphale for forty pianos (here, Herz put his foot down and consented to a mere sixteen), Le Capitole (‘un chœur apothéosiaque’ composed by Herz) and a grand military finale of Hail, Columbia!. Ullmann, who afterwards became one of America’s most celebrated impresarios, was then a very young man ‘with no capital except brains and a profound knowledge of American life’ whose notion of music as an art was ‘to attract to a certain place, and with the aid of accessories which are often of greater service than their principle, the greatest number of people in such a way as to make the receipts exceed the expenditure’. At this he was adept, and he and his client, to couch it in modern parlance, cleaned up.

Herz returned to Paris a wealthy man. He became professor of piano at the Paris Conservatoire and was able to expand his piano factory, winning first prize with one of his instruments at the 1855 Exposition Universelle. The Comtesse de Brémont, in her The Great Virtuosi (Gibbings, 1892), discerned in his picture ‘a well-to-do business man rather than … an artist […] The impression is heightened by the correct frock-coat, white waistcoat, and tall hat; by the mutton-chop whiskers and shaven upper lip. The long and plentiful hair is brushed straight across the head, disclosing a high forehead and shrewdly twinkling eye. He carefully eschewed the vagaries of that school of artistic poseurs who hope to create the aesthetic or artistic effect by a parade of flowing locks and distinctive wardrobe eccentricities.’

Herz died in 1888. His music, as one writer noted, ‘predeceased him by several decades’. Certainly he was no Olympian composer; the genius of men like Chopin, Mendelssohn and Liszt cast deep, obscuring shadows over his ‘delightful tinklings’ (David Dubal: The Art of the Piano, Summit Books, 1989). But Herz is worth far more than an amused sneer – which is what he received time and again from Robert Schumann, who more than any other person taught his contemporaries and every subsequent generation that only music produced by suffering and misery is worth anything, and that profundity should be the sole goal of musical ideals. ‘Schumann’, as the pianist Frank Cooper asserted, ‘led German music towards that self-righteous nationalism from which it has yet fully to recover.’ The fact that Herz was clearly having the time of his life put him well below the salt. Schumann and his followers relegated musical joie de vivre to a lesser art. Cooper again: ‘Poor creature, his jealousy of Herz and Hünten knew no bounds. He wanted to be like them and was miserably equipped for the task, a fact he came to realise after his Opus 1, the Abegg Variations, proved a let-down to audiences. In time, he turned against everything which he took the music of Herz and Hünten to represent and vented in his writings the frustrations of his own shattered technique, burgher upbringing and unstable mentality.’

Really, Herz requires no apologia. He was happy to acknowledge that he courted and reflected the popular taste of the time. What he did, he did well – and did it with so much individuality that even Schumann had to capitulate in finding no other adjective to describe his music than ‘Herzian’. Parisians and Americans enjoyed his playing as much as his compositions. ‘These made no pretence at depth or intensity, but contained many a graceful loop of arpeggio, many a thrum of titillating repeated notes, many a provocative octave leap’ (Arthur Loesser: Men, Women and Pianos, Simon & Schuster, 1954). ‘The bravuras that Herz writes’, wrote a critic in the Allgemeine Musikalische Zeitung (1836), ‘sound good, are easy to listen to, have a fresh lustre, make for mechanically dextrous fingers and fascinate by their clever endings – the utmost bliss attained by many players.’ Herz, in common with Kalkbrenner, Hünten, Pixis and others, was not primarily an interpreter of music by someone greater than himself. The public was interested in these pianist-composers as personalities and came to watch them performing their own particular tricks. Judged by the solo parts of these concertos, Herz must have been an exceptional virtuoso (as well as a competent orchestrator). We can glean something of his keyboard manner from this review in the Boston Daily Evening Transcript of 21 December 1846: ‘Herz is emphatically a great performer; less dashing in manner than many of his predecessors, but great because with apparently little effort, he executes the most difficult passages with rapidity and neatness, with strength and the utmost precision. His delicacy of touch is remarkable, and from beneath his facile fingers each note comes forth clear, liquid, harmonious.’ The Alta California of San Francisco (3 April 1850) was ‘much pleased with the quiet and unassuming manner of Mr Herz while performing’, while the Alabama Planter (15 February 1847), comparing him with Leopold de Meyer, opined: ‘It was like a performer sitting down to amuse himself – there was no apparent effort to make a display, but the delicacy and softness of the execution, united with its vigor and correctness, were positively enchanting. De Meyer may break a piano, but Herz can break a heart.’

Herz’s Piano Concerto No 1 in A major Op 34 (1828, published as ‘Grand Concerto for the pianoforte’) is dedicated to [Caroline], Duchesse de Berry (1798–1870), eldest daughter of Francis, King of the Two Sicilies and widow of the assassinated Charles Ferdinand de Bourbon, Duc de Berry (second son of Charles X). The orchestral opening of the first movement (Allegro moderato) follows the example of many of its contemporaries: subdued statement of the first subject, repeat (fortissimo), quieter lyrical second subject, repeat of first subject and a gradual diminuendo/rallentando before (attacca) the soloist’s dramatic entry. Herz wastes no time in setting the fingers to work, using the entire range of the keyboard (at one perilous point, before the first extended trill and orchestral tutti, sending the right hand spiralling up three octaves and down again in arcing leaps four times in the space of two bars). A slower quasi cadenza section follows (risoluto in D minor) leading to a repeat of the piano’s first entry and, later, the return of the lyrical second subject. Among the technical challenges before the lively close are ascending semiquaver octave triplets in the right hand against semiquaver tenths in the left.

The second movement (Larghetto) in E major has the horns play a the simple Bellini-like theme, repeated by the piano, continued by the horns and again echoed by the soloist. Herz sets forth a decorative version of the same subject against pianissimo strings, before the horns return with the theme, contrasted with the soloist’s demisemiquaver repeated notes above. The graceful theme of the final rondo (marked Allegretto moderato and con dolcezza) puts one in mind of Field, though Herz soon sends the piano spinning off into a succession of dizzying triplet runs, spirited crossed-hand jumps, rapid octave leaps and, indeed, the entire gallery of ‘Herzian’ effects.

Herz followed this with his Piano Concerto No 2 in C minor, Op 74 (1834) which, Schumann wrote, ‘will be liked by those who liked the first. If, by chance, at a concert, a certain C minor symphony [he was alluding to Beethoven’s Fifth] should happen to be given with this, it is to be hoped that the symphony may be given after this concerto.’ Schumann continued the banter on the appearance of Herz’s Piano Concerto No 3 in D minor, Op 87 (1835), finding in its pages likenesses to passages from concertos by Moscheles, Chopin, Thalberg, Kalkbrenner and the scherzo from Beethoven’s Second Symphony. ‘We see that he is determined to learn from the best; and only condescends a little occasionally to heroes of the second rank like Thalberg and Kalkbrenner.’ There then followed the Concerto No 4 in E major, Op 131 (1843); No 5 in F minor, Op 180 (1854); and the weirdly wonderful Concerto No 6 for piano, orchestra and chorus in A major, Op 192 (1858), of which the part-choral final movement (Rondo oriental avec chœur) features a hymn to ‘the sons of the prophet’ and ‘O Mahomet divin’, ending, possibly for the first time in Western music, with the words ‘Gloire au prophète Allah!’. One languishes to hear it.

The Piano Concerto No 7 in B minor Op 207 (1864) is, by comparison with the First Concerto, of almost Conzertstück length and considerably less difficulty from the soloist’s point of view. It is a highly attractive work of its kind, clearly influenced (and none the worse for it) by Chopin, written in the musical language of thirty years earlier. After the sweet themes of the first movement (Allegro moderato) and its unusually subdued ending (in the relative major) comes the Romance in the key of B flat. The first section, in common time, is marked Larghetto senza tempo. These nine bars serve as an introduction to the movement’s main theme in 6/8 (Andantino cantabile) and its passages of delicately executed Chopinesque filigree. Rondo espagnol is the alluring ascription for the finale, though its first theme is more akin to a Polish mazurka. A brief subsidiary idea in thirds, a repeat of the mazurka theme and a con forza end to the episode precede the orchestral exposition of the Hispanic element (playful woodwinds over a chattering bassoon, with triangle). Chopin and Spain battle it out in the most delightful manner to the end, culminating in the Spanish theme being taken up by the soloist (giojoso in B major) and a coda in unison octaves not far removed from that of Chopin’s E minor Concerto.

Herz composed his Piano Concerto No 8 in A flat major Op 218 in 1873, the year before he resigned from the Paris Conservatoire. Listening blind to this concerto, it is surprising to learn that it was written only a year before Tchaikovsky began work on his First Piano Concerto. The underpinning for the first movement (Allegro molto moderato) is found in the rhythmic figure of the first two bars. A succession of brief melodic motifs is presented in Herz’s idiomatic style but now, instead of treacherous runs in thirds and exposed octave leaps, there is, alongside some blistering con fuoco passages, an emphasis on dolente espressivo, con grazia, cantabile and delicato playing. The movement ends repeating the opening rhythmic figure, now in E major. The brief Andantino that follows commences with a theme that could have come from one of Herz’s opera fantasies. A second section (in 12/16) provides a contrast before the opening aria is heard decorated in the left hand and again, after an accompanied cadenza, in the right. The last movement is a high-spirited Polonaise with an unexpected (and heart-catching) digression from A flat to B major and back. Following this is the second subject marked ‘Hymne national’. It is unclear quite to which nation this hymn belongs. Only the Polish national anthem bears a resemblance, albeit a very slight one, to the tune. The orchestra announces it first, repeated by the soloist who links a return to the Polonaise with two pages of bravura leggieramente writing. The national hymn returns before the brilliant coda. Clearly, the aged M. Henri Herz had not lost the common touch.

Jeremy Nicholas © 2004


Other albums in this series
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 64 – Oswald & Napoleão dos Santos' (CDA67984)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 64 – Oswald & Napoleão dos Santos
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67984  NEW   Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 1 – Moszkowski & Paderewski' (CDA66452)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 1 – Moszkowski & Paderewski
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66452 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 2 – Medtner 2 & 3' (CDA66580)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 2 – Medtner 2 & 3
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66580 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 3 – Mendelssohn' (CDA66567)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 3 – Mendelssohn
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66567 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 4 – Arensky & Bortkiewicz' (CDA66624)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 4 – Arensky & Bortkiewicz
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66624 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 5 – Balakirev & Rimsky-Korsakov' (CDA66640)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 5 – Balakirev & Rimsky-Korsakov
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66640 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 6 – Dohnányi' (CDA66684)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 6 – Dohnányi
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66684 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 7 – Alkan & Henselt' (CDA66717)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 7 – Alkan & Henselt
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66717 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 8 – Medtner 1 & Quintet' (CDA66744)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 8 – Medtner 1 & Quintet
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66744 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 9 – Albert' (CDA66747)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 9 – Albert
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66747 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 10 – Weber' (CDA66729)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 10 – Weber
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66729 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 11 – Sauer & Scharwenka' (CDA66790)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 11 – Sauer & Scharwenka
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66790 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 12 – Parry & Stanford' (CDA66820)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 12 – Parry & Stanford
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66820 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 13 – Glazunov & Goedicke' (CDA66877)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 13 – Glazunov & Goedicke
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66877 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 14 – Litolff 2 & 4' (CDA66889)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 14 – Litolff 2 & 4
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66889 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 15 – Hahn & Massenet' (CDA66897)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 15 – Hahn & Massenet
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66897 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 16 – Huss & Schelling' (CDA66949)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 16 – Huss & Schelling
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66949 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 17 – Mendelssohn' (CDA66969)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 17 – Mendelssohn
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66969 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 18 – Korngold & Marx' (CDA66990)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 18 – Korngold & Marx
CDA66990  CD temporarily out of stock  
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 19 – Mackenzie & Tovey' (CDA67023)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 19 – Mackenzie & Tovey
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67023 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 20 – Brüll' (CDA67069)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 20 – Brüll
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67069 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 21 – Dreyschock & Kullak' (CDA67086)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 21 – Dreyschock & Kullak
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67086 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 22 – Busoni' (CDA67143)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 22 – Busoni
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67143 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 23 – Holbrooke & Wood' (CDA67127)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 23 – Holbrooke & Wood
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67127 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 24 – Vianna da Motta' (CDA67163)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 24 – Vianna da Motta
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67163  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 25 – MacDowell' (CDA67165)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 25 – MacDowell
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67165 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 26 – Litolff' (CDA67210)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 26 – Litolff
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67210  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 27 – Saint-Saëns' (CDA67331/2)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 27 – Saint-Saëns
Buy by post £20.00 CDA67331/2  2CDs  
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 28 – Stojowski' (CDA67314)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 28 – Stojowski
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67314 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 29 – Moscheles' (CDA67276)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 29 – Moscheles
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67276 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 30 – Lyapunov' (CDA67326)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 30 – Lyapunov
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67326  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 31 – Fuchs & Kiel' (CDA67354)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 31 – Fuchs & Kiel
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67354 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 32 – Moscheles' (CDA67385)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 32 – Moscheles
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67385 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 33 – Scharwenka' (CDA67365)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 33 – Scharwenka
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67365 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 34 – Pierné' (CDA67348)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 34 – Pierné
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67348 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 36 – Moscheles' (CDA67430)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 36 – Moscheles
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67430 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 37 – Nápravník & Blumenfeld' (CDA67511)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 37 – Nápravník & Blumenfeld
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67511  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 38 – Rubinstein & Scharwenka' (CDA67508)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 38 – Rubinstein & Scharwenka
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67508  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 39 – Delius & Ireland' (CDA67296)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 39 – Delius & Ireland
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67296 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 40 – Herz' (CDA67537)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 40 – Herz
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67537 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 41 – Kalkbrenner' (CDA67535)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 41 – Kalkbrenner
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67535 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 42 – Alnæs & Sinding' (CDA67555)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 42 – Alnæs & Sinding
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67555 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 43 – Bennett & Bache' (CDA67595)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 43 – Bennett & Bache
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67595 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 44 – Melcer-Szczawinski' (CDA67630)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 44 – Melcer-Szczawinski
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67630 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 45 – Hiller' (CDA67655)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 45 – Hiller
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67655 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 46 – Bowen' (CDA67659)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 46 – Bowen
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67659 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 47 – Draeseke & Jadassohn' (CDA67636)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 47 – Draeseke & Jadassohn
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67636 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 48 – Benedict & Macfarren' (CDA67720)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 48 – Benedict & Macfarren
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67720 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 49 – Stenhammar' (CDA67750)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 49 – Stenhammar
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67750 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 50 – Tchaikovsky' (CDA67711/2)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 50 – Tchaikovsky
Buy by post £20.00 CDA67711/2  2CDs  
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 51 – Taubert & Rosenhain' (CDA67765)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 51 – Taubert & Rosenhain
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67765 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 52 – Goetz & Wieniawski' (CDA67791)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 52 – Goetz & Wieniawski
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67791 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 53 – Reger & Strauss' (CDA67635)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 53 – Reger & Strauss
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67635 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 54 – Somervell & Cowen' (CDA67837)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 54 – Somervell & Cowen
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67837 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 55 – Widor' (CDA67817)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 55 – Widor
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67817 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 56 – Kalkbrenner' (CDA67843)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 56 – Kalkbrenner
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67843 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 57 – Wiklund' (CDA67828)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 57 – Wiklund
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67828 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 58 – Pixis & Thalberg' (CDA67915)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 58 – Pixis & Thalberg
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67915 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 59 – Zarzycki & Żeleński' (CDA67958)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 59 – Zarzycki & Żeleński
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67958  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 60 – Dubois' (CDA67931)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 60 – Dubois
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67931  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 61' (CDA67950)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 61
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67950  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 62 – Gounod' (CDA67975)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 62 – Gounod
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67975  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 63 – Godard' (CDA68043)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 63 – Godard
Buy by post £10.50 CDA68043  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
   English   Français   Deutsch