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Hyperion Records

CDA67210 - Litolff: Concertos Symphoniques Nos 3 & 5
CDA67210

Recording details: October 2000
Caird Hall, Dundee, Scotland, United Kingdom
Produced by Andrew Keener
Engineered by Tony Faulkner & Adam Skeaping
Release date: July 2001
Total duration: 65 minutes 55 seconds

GRAMOPHONE EDITOR’S CHOICE

‘I found the first Litolff disc delightful, and this new release is just as captivating. Very warmly recommended’ (Fanfare, USA)

‘Few pianists of any nationality could approach, let alone top, Peter Donohoe’s blistering virtuosity in these works. This is an invaluable issue for lovers of intriguing repertoire and piano-playing of pulverising mastery’ (Gramophone)

'Peter Donohoe … is the ideal man for such music, while the BBCSSO under Andrew Litton offers razor-sharp support. A wonderfully clear recording' (BBC Music Magazine)

‘Donohoe’s pianism is ideally suited to this music, calling as it does for a brilliant, incisive tone, a dazzling leggiero touch and rhythmic punch … dash out and buy the disc forthwith’ (International Record Review)

The Romantic Piano Concerto
Concertos Symphoniques Nos 3 & 5
Maestoso  [11'00]
Presto  [5'35]
Andante  [6'34]
Allegro vivace  [7'38]
Allegro maestoso  [14'46]
Largo  [6'27]
Allegro  [9'09]

This recording is the companion to Donohoe and Litton's earlier recording of Litolff's Concerto Symphoniques 2 & 4 (CDA66889) and completes our survey of the composer's works for piano and orchestra (Litolff's first concerto was never published and is lost).

Both works owe the 'Symphonique' title to their four-movement structure (all Litolff's concertos contain a Scherzo in addition to the three conventional movements), and the importance of the orchestra in their thematic development. The Third Concerto was (along with the Fourth) the most popular in Litolff's lifetime and was written for performance in the Netherlands. It uses two popular Dutch melodies which no doubt explains it early success. The Fifth Concerto is the most obscure of the four extant works yet it is the most ambitious in scale with a particularly imposing orchestral exposition. Unfortunately by the time the work was composed (1867) Litolff had faded from the public eye and the work received few, if any, performances. It's Scherzo, obviously modelled on the equivalent 'hit' piece from the Fourth Concerto, has the potential to be almost as popular, though it's virtuosic leaping octave passages are likely to deter all but the most muscular of pianists.


Other recommended albums
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Litolff: Concertos Symphoniques Nos 2 & 4
Buy by post £10.50 CDA66889 
'Holbrooke & Wood: Piano Concertos' (CDA67127)
Holbrooke & Wood: Piano Concertos
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Busoni: Piano Concerto
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'MacDowell: Piano Concertos' (CDA67165)
MacDowell: Piano Concertos
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Introduction  EnglishFrançaisDeutsch
Few composers of the nineteenth century could boast the same degree of personal turbulence, intrigue, and drama as Henry Litolff. His life, which reads like the pages of a romantic novel by Hugo or Dumas, was a tapestry of passion and torment, punctuated by marriage, divorce, and a nomadic existence that took him all over Europe. This is borne out by the French pianist Antoine Marmontel who, in his Virtuoses Contemporains (1882) described the sixty-four-year-old Litolff, often nicknamed ‘The English Liszt’, in the following, vivid manner:

The intelligent and characteristic physiognomy of Litolff apparently bears the imprint of agitations and moral tempests which have troubled his soul. Silver hair crowns a prominently developed forehead. His lean features etched on a pale countenance are fine and distinguished; but upon considering with attention his original and characteristic visage, one has the impression of premature age hastened by the storms of life. The unusual health hazards to which a great artist is exposed have given him a nervous tremor. It is true, though, that a career as rapidly moving as his would have destroyed nearly anyone else except himself. His life has been so much an idyll, a drama, and always a novelistic intrigue.

Litolff’s father, Martin Louis Litolff, was Alsatian by birth and fought with Napoleon’s army in Spain during the Peninsular War. Captured by Wellington’s victorious forces, he was taken to England and released after the concord of peace. After settling in London Martin Litolff eked out a living as a dance violinist and married a Scotswoman, Sophie Hayes. Henry (Charles) Litolff was the couple’s only son. He received his musical education from his father until he was twelve, at which time the boy’s gifts were already conspicuous. At fourteen he was noticed by Ignaz Moscheles who was so impressed by his talent that he offered to teach him. Lessons continued with Moscheles (fees for which were generously waived) until 1835. Completely infatuated with a young Englishwoman, Elisabeth Etherington, he eloped with her to Gretna Green to escape the determined opposition of his parents. After they were married, the couple escaped to France, setting up home in the village of Melun near Paris. In the French capital he became acquainted with Pierre-Josef-Guillaume Zimmerman and the piano manufacturer Jean-Henri Pape, and spent much of his time developing his piano technique.

A restive spirit, Litolff did not remain in Melun long. Pape introduced him to Fétis who engaged the young pianist to give a concert at the Brussels conservatory in 1839. Litolff played Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto to great acclaim and attracted the patronage of the Duc de Looz who invited him to his estate near Wavre. There Litolff composed his first Concerto Symphonique in D minor, which has been lost. During this period he also separated from his wife who, somewhat penitently, travelled back to her family in England. According to Fétis, Litolff became embroiled in a scandal in Brussels from which he had to extricate himself rather hurriedly in 1841. Of the scandal’s nature we can only speculate, but it was probably a love affair of some kind. Aided by his friends he put Brussels well behind him by moving to Warsaw where, Fétis states, he was conductor of the National Theatre orchestra. Little is heard of Litolff at this time, but it has been suggested that this was due to either prolonged depression or even temporary insanity.

His reappearance on the musical scene was marked by concerts he gave at the Leipzig Gewandhaus and in Dresden in 1844 and by the first hearing of his Concerto Symphonique No 2, Op 22. His presence, brilliant technique and eccentric musical style impressed the young Hans von Bülow, whose family befriended and supported him during the course of 1845. As well as teaching Bülow, Litolff enjoyed successful concerts in Prague and Berlin. His new-found fame, which approached that of Chopin and Liszt, restored his spirits, but he was nevertheless troubled by his matrimonial predicament and the public embarrassment it was causing. Suffering another bout of ill-health, Litolff returned to London in order to divorce his wife in the English courts. It proved to be a messy business and at the trial he was ordered by the judge to live with his wife or else pay her the sum of £2,000. Unable to pay the latter and unwilling to do the former, he was thrown into a debtors’ prison where he remained miserably for several months. Ever resourceful, he took advantage of a friendship with the jailor’s daughter and escaped to the coast in a farm wagon where, incognito, he was able to embark (probably with a sufficient bribe) on a fishing boat to Holland. Smuggling himself ashore, he managed to establish himself as a respectable musician, teaching and giving concerts in Utrecht and Amsterdam. There he composed his Concerto Symphonique No 3 in E flat, Op 45, which, as a tribute to the Dutch people, and in thanks for his safe asylum, incorporated two old Dutch tunes.

The Dutch newspapers, enamoured with Litolff, dubbed him the ‘Vieuxtemps of the piano’. Dutch audiences were similarly besotted with him and the students of Utrecht even wrote a poem in his honour begging him not to forget them. Litolff, however, was keen to move on. During the summer of 1847 he convalesced in the Harz Mountains in the German duchy of Brunswick and composed his first opera Die Braut von Kynast which was first performed under Fétis’s direction in Brussels on 3 October 1847. Brunswick seemed amenable to him; there he made the acquaintance of Gottfried Meyer, the music publisher, and his wife Julie, who were to play an important future role in his life.

In 1848 he went to Vienna where he soon became caught up in the Revolution. Championing the cause of freedom, he composed a march ‘in fraternal dedication’ to the Legion of Students of which he was a member. Emulating Wagner’s flight from Dresden, Litolff fled Vienna after a warrant for his arrest was issued. He sought refuge in Brunswick with the Meyers and was granted citizenship in 1849.

Although he continued to travel (he made a second visit to Holland and gave concerts in Leipzig), his mental state was precarious and further bouts of depression and hypochondria followed. In 1851 a divorce from his first wife was finally effected and he married Julie Meyer whose husband had died in 1849. This enabled Litolff to take over the running of the publishing firm, the name of which was changed to ‘Henry Litolff’s Verlag’. Under Litolff’s control the firm published many works by the masters in cheap, affordable editions, and the inventory of works also included his own. Brunswick also enjoyed a period of artistic enrichment for Litolff undertook a series of festivals which included the presence of Anton Rubinstein, Liszt, Berlioz, Bülow and Moscheles.

After a period of creative silence, probably owing in large part to his involvement in publishing after his second marriage, Litolff launched himself into the concert world once again. A third tour to the Netherlands saw the composition of his Concerto Symphonique No 4, Op 102, which was performed with great success there and in Belgium under Fétis. The Fourth Concerto, along with a revival of the Third, proved to be immensely popular and Litolff was carried along on the crest of this new wave of public admiration. His overtures, Maximilian Robespierre Op 55 and Die Girondisten Op 80 (much admired by Tchaikovsky) were also favourably received, but none equalled the approbation of the Fourth Concerto which was dedicated to the Duke of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. The Duke became Litolff’s new employer, though the life of Kapellmeister did not satisfy the pianist for long. Bouts of depression continued to plague him and neglect of his second wife led to a divorce in 1858, after which Litolff moved to Paris.

At a concert des jeunes artistes du conservatoire directed by Jules-Étienne Pasdeloup in Paris, Litolff scored a major success with the Fourth Concerto. Attending this concert was Berlioz who described the occasion as ‘the most brilliant day in the existence of the Société des Jeunes Artistes’ and gave an account of Litolff’s career. Litolff, Berlioz continued, was ‘a composer of a most elevated order. He possesses at the same time science, inspiration, and good sense. Yet a devouring ardour is at the bottom of his character and leads him necessarily to violence and exaggerations from which the beauty of his musical productions has always suffered …’ Litolff later shared a concert in Paris with Berlioz in which his third and fourth concertos featured along with extracts from his cantata Faust.

Leaving his home in Brunswick behind, Litolff found solace at the country home of Count Wilfrid de la Rochefoucauld near Fountainbleau. There he fell in love with the Count’s daughter Louise and married her in 1860. Though little is known of this period of Litolff’s life, it appears that he found a new stability and decided to make Paris his permanent home. Though he continued to tour Europe as a piano virtuoso—during the period 1864/5 he visited Belgium and Holland, and travelled to Austria, Poland, and Russia in 1867—he devoted more time to conducting and to the composition of several operas and an oratorio. He also became well known as a piano teacher. Between 1867 and 1870 he was conductor of the Paris Opera and organised large-scale concerts of orchestral music of ‘modern and ancient’ music for which young composers were invited to submit new works for scrutiny and performance. The end of this period, which was to be Litolff’s last phase of fertile creativity, was marked by the premiere of his Concerto Symphonique No 5 in C minor, Op 123, in February 1870. Gradual decline followed. His operas made no impression with the public and his orchestral concerts disintegrated. Turning instead to light music and operetta, he presented festivals at the Théâtre du Châtelet and conducted concerts of light music at Frascati’s famous Paris restaurant and at a café concert on the Champs-Élysées. Three years after the death of his third wife (in 1873) he married for the fourth and final time to a seventeen-year-old girl who had nursed him back to health in 1875. In his last years he was afflicted with rheumatism though he still found time for composition, as is evidenced by the premiere of his last major work, the opera Les Templiers, in Brussels on 25 January 1886. He died at the age of 73 at Bois-Colombes near Paris on 5 August 1891.

Henri Litolff was one of the last of the great composer-pianists of the nineteenth century. Although opera occupied much of his time after 1870, it was his five concertos, or Concertos Symphoniques (as they appeared in print), that punctuated the main part of his professional career. These works tell us much about the composer’s impressive technical abilities as a pianist, but more importantly, they provide evidence of a stylistic eclecticism that is Janus-like in its propensity to look back to the more classically orientated concerto style-forms of the first half of the nineteenth century (to Beethoven, Kalkbrenner, Moscheles and Chopin) and yet at the same time the bold harmony, rich orchestration, and rhythmic invention look forward to the second half, particularly to Liszt and Scharwenka. Moreover, Litolff’s style shares with Berlioz a vein of eccentricity in his harmonic progressions, use of orchestral timbres, and structural designs that is constantly engaging in its unpredictability and power to surprise.

The distinctive generic title of Concerto Symphonique essentially derives from Litolff’s larger scheme of four movements (rather than the traditional three) designed to emulate the four-movement plan of the symphony, where a scherzo also forms a significant and (for Litolff) highly characteristic part of the work. Litolff’s four surviving concertos have also been described as symphonies concertantes, in which, it has been suggested, the piano plays the role of obbligato to the orchestra. This argument seems harder to justify. In his first movements, Litolff uses the orchestra to present all his main thematic material, but this in no way deviates from the conventional orchestral introduction or ritornello of the classical concerto of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, nor from the so-called ‘double exposition’ shared between the soloist and orchestra; more to the point, the role of solo and ripieno is played out in much the same manner as one would expect in a ritornello-sonata conflation of the Classical or early Romantic era. A comparison with the concertos of Beethoven, Chopin, Moscheles and Hummel bears this out. Furthermore, it is hard not to see the piano as central to the remaining three movements (especially the scherzo) not only in terms of the sheer weight of material it is given, but also in the very nature of the material itself whose character is determined by the technical nature and capabilities of the instrument and performer.

Litolff’s Concerto Symphonique No 3 in E flat major Op 45 dates from 1846 while he was in Holland. Subtitled ‘National Hollandais’, it expressed a message of gratitude to the people of the Netherlands for his freedom after escaping from prison in England. The work therefore encapsulated a sense of liberty of personal significance to the composer, but it also communicates broader political messages of freedom. An implicit believer in the principles of the French Revolution of 1789, Litolff carried high the ideals of human liberty and democracy over the hegemony of despotic monarchical governments (ideals which nearly got him arrested in Vienna in 1848), a sentiment which is particularly evident in the martial confidence of the first movement. Moreover, the concerto’s incorporation of Dutch tunes served both to elevate a sense of nationhood in Holland as well as that of adjacent Belgium who had gained freedom from rule by the House of Orange in 1830.

With the sound of wind band and timpani, the first movement opens with a military air. Such an idea might have emanated from a ‘revolutionary’ opera of Méhul, Cherubini, or Le Sueur. Amid bold dynamic contrasts and unconventional progressions, the military dominates the orchestral exposition, though relief is temporarily provided (in a manner akin to Beethoven and Hummel) by reference to the lyrical second subject. Such a procedure had already been explored in the Second Concerto Symphonique (recorded on Hyperion CDA66889) and would unswervingly form the basis of his later concertos albeit with a greater sense of aplomb. The piano enters obliquely, as if embarking upon a cadenza, before orchestra and soloist launch into the second exposition. This phase of the work, the so-called second exposition, effectively expands the material already heard in the orchestral introduction, though now as part of a larger sonata-ritornello structure. The central orchestral ritornello takes us from the dominant, B flat, to the relative, C minor, marked by a closing cadence. This forms a platform for the development which begins with a veiled quotation from Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto, a work Litolff greatly admired and which he frequently played on his European tours. Still in C minor, this yields to a nocturnal re-interpretation of the military idea, reminiscent of Field. A shift away from the relative is marked by the appearance of the lyrical secondary material, which, ever more frenetically for the soloist, moves towards the dominant. The recapitulation, very much understated (after the piano’s second cadenza), is signalled by the restatement of the second subject, first in the piano, and then by the orchestral tutti. This material essentially constitutes the much truncated reprise, for it is only in the spirited coda that Litolff chooses to restate the military music as a grand closing gesture.

The scherzo, with its ubiquitous ‘tripping’ figures (created by the prolixity of acciaccaturas) and dialogue between soloist and orchestra, has all those familiar characteristics of the corresponding movement in the more famous Fourth Concerto. In the latter, Litolff adopted the more conventional ternary design, but in his Third Concerto the structure and tonal organisation are altogether more unconventional. The opening 97 bars of music in C minor, deftly orientated around the dominant, function as an extended preparation for the main focus of the movement, a full orchestral statement of a Dutch children’s song ‘Al is ons Prinsje nog zoo klein’. This tune then forms the basis of a fugal paragraph which also ends on the dominant, while a third section, marked ‘Presto’, attempts to restore C minor, only for the dominant to re-assert itself once again. This entire process is repeated wholesale, the final ‘Presto’ section this time used as a coda to establish C as the unequivocal tonic.

The slow movement, in a simple ternary song form, features Litolff’s favoured sonorities of the cello and horn. The nocturnal mood, reminiscent once again of Field (though the harmonic world has the modernity of Chopin and Liszt), is disturbed briefly by an episode of tension and drama, but it soon gives way to a restatement of the main melody, more fully scored for the orchestra with decorative arpeggios and scalic passages in the piano.

The finale has a lightness and vivacity like those scintillating closing movements in Mendelssohn’s concertos, where extreme agility is demanded not only in rapid passages of semiquavers, but also in spread tenths and double octaves. For the second subject Litolff introduced a second Dutch tune, ‘Wien Neerlands bloed’ (by Johann Wilhelm Wilms), which was widely sung in Belgium in 1830 during the successful uprising against the House of Orange. In fragmented form this anthem constitutes the bulk of the ensuing development and is strikingly recapitulated in B major in Litolff’s beloved lower strings. The recovery to E flat major, via its subdominant, is also executed with a Lisztian boldness, especially in the arresting orchestral transition that links this lyrical section to the athletic coda.

Litolff’s Third Concerto enjoyed almost as much popularity as the Fourth in later years and was often performed not only by Litolff himself but by other aspiring virtuosi. The larger and more mature Concerto Symphonique No 5 in C minor Op 123, while well thought of, appears to have enjoyed less attention than its two forbears. This may be owing in part to the concerto’s considerable technical challenge in all four movements. It is also possible, however, that the more serious demeanour of the work appealed less to pianists and concert promoters than the Third and Fourth Concertos which had already become immensely popular over a period of twenty years or more beforehand. Yet in many ways the Fifth Concerto contains some of Litolff’s most interesting music. The scale of the work is also larger and more dramatic in gesture, the orchestral palette is more spacious (symptomatic of the developments in orchestral instruments of the later nineteenth century), and the harmonic palette more experimental.

The structural processes of the first movement are much the same as practised in the earlier concertos—i.e. the classical organisation and delineation of soloist and orchestra remain intact—but it is in the nature and expression of the ideas that one detects a stylistic change. A new romanticism is evident in the brooding, almost Faustian darkness of the orchestral opening (which stretches to 132 bars compared with the 85 of the Third Concerto), and the influence of Liszt is plain to see in the richer harmonic vocabulary of the second subject (the initial dominant eleventh is a particular Lisztian thumbprint). There is also a broader contour to the melodic lines, and a greater confidence in the counter melodies invariably to be found in the tenor register of the cellos, both of which contribute to a greater sense of symphonic cohesiveness.

The second movement, a scherzo in the Second, Third, and Fourth Concertos, is instead a slow movement of haunting beauty in E major, a ‘song without words’ dominated by the sumptuous, ‘vocal’ character of the cello and horn. The piano too has much splendid material as is borne out by the passionately Lisztian response to the opening orchestral statement (the sense of harmonic control, particularly in the recovery back to E major, is masterly) and the dramatic, not to say histrionic gestures of the central section.

The scherzo, entitled ‘Intermède’, is a more demonic counterpart to its sister in the Fourth Concerto. With its angular sevenths, lean counterpoint, and sudden tonal shifts the movement has much in common with the Mephistophelian ethos of Liszt’s symphony and waltzes, though there is also that individual wry humour, colourful scoring (note especially the distinctive use of piccolo and triangle), and rhythmic vitality individual to Litolff’s extrovert personality. A foil to the sinewy texture is provided by a euphonious lilting theme suspended above the dominant of E flat, though this idea soon becomes infected with the idée fixe of the seventh interval. This may also be said of the unusual trio which begins in a becalmed manner with pizzicato strings and fragments of a pastoral bassoon solo, but is very quickly dispelled by further development of the scherzo material.

The sonata rondo finale must be one of Litolff’s most bizarre and eccentric creations, yet it also embodies something of the composer’s latent originality. The classical rhetoric of the opening suggests that Litolff was once again looking back to Beethoven’s Third Concerto for his model, yet the overtly romantic second group of ideas, introduced by the piano, is finally balanced between a Mendelssohn Song without Words and a Lisztian ballade. Litolff’s recapitulatory process is also highly imaginative for in place of the conventional restatement of the first subject he inserts an extended cadenza of ferocious technical difficulty. Besides transforming the first subject, the cadenza, a full blown fugue, functions as a secondary development within the wider context of the movement’s sonata structure and is a logical outcome of the material’s fugal potential hinted at during the opening portion of the movement. The dynamic energy of the fugue looks back in part to Beethoven, but one suspects that it was Liszt’s use of fugue as a vehicle of modernity that inspired Litolff to write this extraordinary paragraph. For his part Liszt, who admired Litolff and his concertos immensely, dedicated his First Concerto (1849; revised 1853 and 1855) to his friend. It also seems likely that Litolff’s four-movement model played a part in the construction of Liszt’s work, since a scherzo (replete with Litolff’s much-loved triangle), features prominently at its centre.

Jeremy Dibble © 2001


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The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 35 – Herz
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67465 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 36 – Moscheles' (CDA67430)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 36 – Moscheles
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 37 – Nápravník & Blumenfeld' (CDA67511)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 37 – Nápravník & Blumenfeld
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 38 – Rubinstein & Scharwenka' (CDA67508)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 38 – Rubinstein & Scharwenka
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 39 – Delius & Ireland' (CDA67296)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 39 – Delius & Ireland
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 40 – Herz' (CDA67537)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 40 – Herz
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 41 – Kalkbrenner' (CDA67535)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 41 – Kalkbrenner
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67535 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 42 – Alnæs & Sinding' (CDA67555)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 42 – Alnæs & Sinding
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67555 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 43 – Bennett & Bache' (CDA67595)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 43 – Bennett & Bache
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 44 – Melcer-Szczawinski' (CDA67630)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 44 – Melcer-Szczawinski
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 45 – Hiller' (CDA67655)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 45 – Hiller
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 46 – Bowen' (CDA67659)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 46 – Bowen
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67659 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 47 – Draeseke & Jadassohn' (CDA67636)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 47 – Draeseke & Jadassohn
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67636 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 48 – Benedict & Macfarren' (CDA67720)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 48 – Benedict & Macfarren
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67720 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 49 – Stenhammar' (CDA67750)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 49 – Stenhammar
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67750 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 50 – Tchaikovsky' (CDA67711/2)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 50 – Tchaikovsky
Buy by post £20.00 CDA67711/2  2CDs  
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 51 – Taubert & Rosenhain' (CDA67765)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 51 – Taubert & Rosenhain
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 52 – Goetz & Wieniawski' (CDA67791)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 52 – Goetz & Wieniawski
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67791 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 53 – Reger & Strauss' (CDA67635)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 53 – Reger & Strauss
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67635 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 54 – Somervell & Cowen' (CDA67837)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 54 – Somervell & Cowen
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67837 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 55 – Widor' (CDA67817)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 55 – Widor
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67817 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 56 – Kalkbrenner' (CDA67843)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 56 – Kalkbrenner
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'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 57 – Wiklund' (CDA67828)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 57 – Wiklund
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67828 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 58 – Pixis & Thalberg' (CDA67915)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 58 – Pixis & Thalberg
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67915 
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 59 – Zarzycki & Żeleński' (CDA67958)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 59 – Zarzycki & Żeleński
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67958  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 60 – Dubois' (CDA67931)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 60 – Dubois
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67931  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 61' (CDA67950)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 61
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67950  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
'The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 62 – Gounod' (CDA67975)
The Romantic Piano Concerto, Vol. 62 – Gounod
Buy by post £10.50 CDA67975  Studio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
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