Welcome to Hyperion Records, an independent British classical label devoted to presenting high-quality recordings of music of all styles and from all periods from the twelfth century to the twenty-first.

Hyperion offers both CDs, and downloads in a number of formats. The site is also available in several languages.

Please use the dropdown buttons to set your preferred options, or use the checkbox to accept the defaults.

O God, our help in ages past – St Anne

First line:
O God, our help in ages past
composer
arranger
author of text

 
This famous hymn is by Isaac Watts (1674–1748) in his The Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament (1719), where it begins ‘Our God, our help in ages past’, changed to ‘O God’ by John Wesley in his Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1738). It was widely popular in Methodist and dissenting circles but did not come into Anglican use until the early 19th century.

The tune St Anne[’s] is by William Croft (1678–1727), and is named after the Soho parish church where he was organist when the tune was anonymously printed with Tate and Brady’s Psalm 42 (‘As pants the hart for cooling streams When heated in the chase’), in the Supplement to the New Version of Psalms, 6th edition (1708). This was to become one of the archetypal English hymn tunes, so much so that it became the nickname for a Bach fugue that happened to be based on the same opening phrase. The first publication joining the tune to the hymn was The Psalm and Hymn Tunes, used at St Johns Chapel, Bedford Row (1814), by Theophania Cecil, organist at the Evangelical Anglican proprietary chapel where her father, Richard Cecil, was minister. It is not known who originated the brief movement to an E major chord at the end of line 3, found in Hymns A&M from the earliest edition (1861) onwards. In the present arrangement the last verse anticipates that chord in line 2.

from notes by Nicholas Temperley © 2016

Ce célèbre cantique d’Isaac Watts (1674-1748) figure dans ses Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament (1719), où il débute par «Our God, our help in ages past», que John Wesley changea en «O God» dans sa Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1738). Extrêmement apprécié dans les cercles méthodistes et dissidents, il n’entra cependant dans l’usage anglican qu’au début du XIXe siècle.

La mélodie St Anne[’s] est de William Croft (1678-1727), et porte le nom de l’église paroissiale de Soho où il était organiste quand la mélodie parut anonymement avec le psaume 42 de Tate and Brady («As pants the hart for cooling streams when heated in the chase»), dans le Supplement to the New Version of Psalms (sixième édition, 1708). Elle était destinée à devenir l’un des archétypes du cantique anglais, à tel point qu’elle servit de surnom à une fugue de Bach qui se trouve fondée sur la même phrase initiale. La première publication joignant la mélodie au texte est The Psalm and Hymn Tunes, used at St Johns Chapel, Bedford Row (1814), de Theophania Cecil, organiste à la chapelle anglicane évangélique où son père, Richard Cecil, était ministre. On ne sait pas qui est à l’origine du bref mouvement vers un accord de mi majeur à la fin du troisième vers, qu’on trouve dans Hymns Ancient & Modern dès la première édition (1861). Dans le présent arrangement, la dernière strophe préfigure cet accord dès le deuxième vers.

extrait des notes rédigées par Nicholas Temperley © 2016
Français: Dennis Collins

Dieses berühmte Kirchenlied Isaac Watts’ (1674–1748) findet sich in seiner Sammlung The Psalms of David Imitated in the Language of the New Testament (1719), wo es mit den Worten beginnt: „Our God, our help in ages past“, was John Wesley in seiner Collection of Psalms and Hymns (1738) zu „O God“ abänderte. In methodistischen und Dissenterkreisen war der Choral sehr beliebt, in die anglikanische Kirche hielt er erst zu Anfang des 19. Jahrhunderts Einzug.

Die Melodie St Anne[’s] stammt von William Croft (1678–1727) und ist nach der Gemeindekirche in Soho benannt, wo er als Organist diente zu der Zeit, als die Weise im Supplement to the New Version of Psalms, 6. Auflage (1708), anonym mit Tate und Bradys Psalm 42 („As pants the hart for cooling streams / When heated in the chase“) erschien. Sie wurde zu einer der archetypischen englischen Melodien für Kirchenlieder, und zwar so sehr, dass „St Anne“ im Englischen zum Beinamen einer Bach-Fuge wurde, die zufälligerweise mit derselben einleitenden Phrase beginnt. Melodie und Text wurden gemeinsam erstmals veröffentlicht in The Psalm and Hymn Tunes, used at St. Johns Chapel, Bedford Row (1814) von Theophania Cecil, Organistin an der evangelikalanglikanischen Eigenkirche, wo ihr Vater Richard Cecil als Pfarrer diente. Unbekannt ist, wer am Ende der dritten Zeile für die kurze Bewegung zu einem E-Dur-Akkord verantwortlich war, wie sie bereits in der ersten Ausgabe von Hymns Ancient & Modern (1861) zu finden ist. Im vorliegenden Arrangement nimmt die letzte Strophe diesen Akkord in der zweiten Zeile vorweg.

aus dem Begleittext von Nicholas Temperley © 2016
Deutsch: Ursula Wulfekamp

Recordings

An English Coronation 1902-1953
Studio Master: SIGCD569Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Hymns from King's
Studio Master: KGS0014Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Praise my soul
Studio Master: SIGCD545Download onlyStudio Master FLAC & ALAC downloads available
Remembrance
CDA67398
Sing, ye Heavens - Hymns for all time
COLCD126Download only

Details

Track 7 on CDA67398 [3'04]
Track 1 on COLCD126 [4'35] Download only
Track 16 on KGS0014 [3'27] Download only
Track 3 on SIGCD545 [2'48] Download only
Track 6 on SIGCD569 CD1 [3'51] Download only

Track-specific metadata

Click track numbers above to select
Waiting for content to load...
Waiting for content to load...