Chausson: Concert & Piano Quartet
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'Never have I had such a success! I can't get over it. Everyone seems to love the Concert.'

So wrote Chausson in his diary after the first performance of his Concert in D major (1892); the Brussels audience present at this event had won him his first real triumph. The work is a model of cohesion, with strong ideas and melodies of great impact. The autograph manuscript is covered with alterations and crossings-out, signs of the composer's drive towards absolute perfection in this masterpiece of chamber music.

The Piano Quartet was written in 1897 and once again its premiere saw the audience, this time in Paris, moved by the infectious vitality and undeniable force of the music. Had Chausson not died falling off his bike eighteen months later his chamber music output would no doubt have included many more such works and won the recognition which these two works show it to deserve.

CDA66907  74 minutes 9 seconds
CLASSIC CD CHOICE
PRIX CAECILIA PRIJS
‘It is difficult not to succumb to what has been aptly called Chausson's 'refined and voluptuous melancholy', to a richness and complexity that can engulf the senses’ (Gramophone)
‘These accounts traverse the gamut of emotions, bristling with energy, lyricism and conviction, and ensuring that this disc will never gather much dust’ (BBC Music Magazine)
‘An exemplary recording of one of his finest works’ (The Times)