Hyperion Records

The song of the creatures
First line:
Here begin the Lauds of the creatures
composer
1987
author of text
Canticle of the Sun

Recordings
'Burgon: Choral Music' (CDH55421)
Burgon: Choral Music
Buy by post £5.50 CDH55421  Helios (Hyperion's budget label)  
Details
Track 14 on CDH55421 [12'15] Helios (Hyperion's budget label)

The song of the creatures
In July 1987 Burgon completed his longest work for choir since The Fire of Heaven fourteen years earlier. The song of the creatures was commissioned for the Choir of St Matthew’s Church, Northampton, begetters of a remarkable series of miniature choral masterpieces by, among others, Britten, Berkeley, Kenneth Leighton, Edmund Rubbra and Gerald Finzi. Its form frames and articulates the canticle attributed to St Francis of Assisi, supposedly written by him while he ‘lay sick at Saint Damiano’. The saint’s song is delivered from the perspective of a blind man, unable to see the sun but as sure of its presence as he is of the splendour of God’s creation. Burgon’s litany of praises eventually settles on an instantly memorable hymn-like tune, itself prefaced by a majestic organ outburst and quietly revealed by a succession of unison trebles and tenors. An animated version of the same melody for a duet of solo treble and tenor gives way to a heartfelt choral benediction for those who ‘find themselves in thy most holy will’ and a return to the unison writing of the work’s opening.

from notes by Andrew Stewart 2006

Track-specific metadata
Details for CDH55421 track 14
Artists
ISRC
GB-AJY-06-56714
Duration
12'15
Recording date
23 February 2006
Recording venue
Wells Cathedral, United Kingdom
Recording producer
Mark Brown
Recording engineer
Julian Millard
Hyperion usage
  1. Burgon: Choral Music (CDA67567)
    Disc 1 Track 14
    Release date: November 2006
    Deletion date: March 2010
    Superseded by CDH55421
  2. Burgon: Choral Music (CDH55421)
    Disc 1 Track 14
    Release date: March 2013
    Helios (Hyperion's budget label)
   English   Français   Deutsch